Breast-feeding prevents later heart disease

Breast-feeding prevents later heart disease

Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 14th, 2004, 12:33 pm #1

New research suggests that babies who are breastfed are less likely to develop atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) as adults, and the lower risk may be due to breast milk permanently altering the way cholesterol is stored by the body.

"The findings suggest that infant nutrition permanently affects the lipoprotein profile later in life, and specifically that breast-milk feeding has a beneficial effect," said Atul Singhal from the Institute of Child Health in London."

More about this at:
http://news.google.com/news?num=30&hl=e ... %3d5138947

This is yet more research showing nature's way is the best way! I think this is good for breast freedom too- ending the notion that many have that breast-feeding is an outdated and unnecessary self-indulgence. Indeed, at the rate things are going, someday moms who *don't* breast-feed may be charged with child endangerment!
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Joined: April 11th, 2004, 7:40 pm

May 14th, 2004, 2:51 pm #2

For the more scientifically inclined this article appeared in this morning's on-line Lancet:

http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol363 ... ch.29570.1

Lancet: Volume 363, Number 9421,15 May 2004

Here is the abstract:

Breastmilk feeding and lipoprotein profile in adolescents born preterm: follow-up of a prospective randomised study

Atul Singhal, Tim J Cole, Mary Fewtrell, Alan Lucas

MRC Childhood Nutrition Research Centre (A Singhal MD, M Fewtrell MD, A Lucas FRCP) and Centre for Paediatric Epidemiology and Biostatistics (T J Cole ScD), Institute of Child Health, London, UK

Correspondence to: Dr A Singhal, MRC Childhood Nutrition Research Centre, Institute of Child Health, 30 Guilford Street, London WC1N 1EH, UK (e-mail:a.singhal@ich.ucl.ac.uk)

Summary

Background Breastfeeding is associated with reduced cholesterol concentration later in life, but previous studies have not used random assignment of infant diet with prospective follow-up. We tested the hypothesis that breastmilk feeding benefits the lipoprotein profile in adolescents born preterm, in whom randomisation to different diets at birth is feasible.

Methods 926 infants born preterm were randomly assigned in two parallel trials to receive (trial 1) donated banked breastmilk or preterm formula, or (trial 2) standard term formula or preterm formula, as sole diet or as supplements to mother's milk in both trials. We followed up 216 participants at age 13-16 years and measured ratio of low-density to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL to HDL), ratio of apolipoprotein B to apolipoprotein A-1 (apoB to apoA-1), and concentration of C-reactive protein (CRP; a measure of the inflammatory process associated with atherosclerosis).

Results Adolescents who had been randomised to banked breastmilk had a lower CRP concentration (p=0·006) and LDL to HDL ratio (mean difference 0·34 [14% lower], 95% CI -0·67 to -0·01; p=0·04) than those given preterm formula. A greater proportion of human milk intake in infancy was associated with lower ratios of LDL to HDL (p=0·03) and apoB to apoA-1 (p=0·004)--independent of gestation and potential confounding factors--and with lower CRP concentration (p=0·03). CRP concentration correlated with the two lipoprotein ratios (p<0·0001 and p=0·003, respectively).

Interpretation Our data provide experimental evidence for the long-term benefits of breastmilk feeding on the risk of atherosclerosis.

Lancet 2004; 363: 1571-78
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Joined: April 11th, 2004, 7:40 pm

May 14th, 2004, 3:02 pm #3

New research suggests that babies who are breastfed are less likely to develop atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) as adults, and the lower risk may be due to breast milk permanently altering the way cholesterol is stored by the body.

"The findings suggest that infant nutrition permanently affects the lipoprotein profile later in life, and specifically that breast-milk feeding has a beneficial effect," said Atul Singhal from the Institute of Child Health in London."

More about this at:
http://news.google.com/news?num=30&hl=e ... %3d5138947

This is yet more research showing nature's way is the best way! I think this is good for breast freedom too- ending the notion that many have that breast-feeding is an outdated and unnecessary self-indulgence. Indeed, at the rate things are going, someday moms who *don't* breast-feed may be charged with child endangerment!


About time we had something here about what breasts are actually about!

Michael
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niemand
niemand

May 14th, 2004, 5:43 pm #4

WHAT......?
HUH....?
OH YEAH...THATS WHAT THEIR FOR!!!!!!
One could easliy forget with all the other conversations and emphasis.
Thank you !!
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tam
tam

May 15th, 2004, 4:13 am #5

New research suggests that babies who are breastfed are less likely to develop atherosclerosis (clogged arteries) as adults, and the lower risk may be due to breast milk permanently altering the way cholesterol is stored by the body.

"The findings suggest that infant nutrition permanently affects the lipoprotein profile later in life, and specifically that breast-milk feeding has a beneficial effect," said Atul Singhal from the Institute of Child Health in London."

More about this at:
http://news.google.com/news?num=30&hl=e ... %3d5138947

This is yet more research showing nature's way is the best way! I think this is good for breast freedom too- ending the notion that many have that breast-feeding is an outdated and unnecessary self-indulgence. Indeed, at the rate things are going, someday moms who *don't* breast-feed may be charged with child endangerment!
OK.... I'm not buying this one at all.... I read about it last week. My mother breast fed me for 6 months and before I began medication my cholesterol was over 300.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2004, 2:07 pm #6

Medical studies are based on statistical averages. There are always exceptions. There are people who smoke cigarettes for fifty years and never get lung cancer but that doesn't mean smoking doesn't cause lung cancer. Likewise, you can walk blindfolded across a busy highway and not get run over, but that doesn't mean the next guy who tries it won't.
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Lynn
Lynn

May 15th, 2004, 4:46 pm #7

OK.... I'm not buying this one at all.... I read about it last week. My mother breast fed me for 6 months and before I began medication my cholesterol was over 300.
A biology professor once joked "All bears walk in single file, at least the one I saw did." It means nothing that one particular individual was an exception to the rule. Not all smokers get lung cancer and some non-smokers do get lung cancer. However, it is well-established that smoking increases the RATE of lung cancer. You might be able to walk across an Interstate highway with your eyes closed and survive, but that doesn't prove that there is no connection with such activity and health risk. Exceptions and averages are two very different things. Many many studies have shown a connection between breastfeeding and inproved average health risks of both mother and child. Many of these are discussed at that wonderful site www.007b.com
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Lynn
Lynn

May 15th, 2004, 4:48 pm #8

Medical studies are based on statistical averages. There are always exceptions. There are people who smoke cigarettes for fifty years and never get lung cancer but that doesn't mean smoking doesn't cause lung cancer. Likewise, you can walk blindfolded across a busy highway and not get run over, but that doesn't mean the next guy who tries it won't.
Nat, sorry to have also used your two examples. I wrote my post before I noticed yours. Gee, we sure thought alike on that one.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 15th, 2004, 5:34 pm #9

Yes, it is interesting that we both pick not one- but two identical analogies, Lynn.

I think this proves something!- I'm just not sure what!
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Tam
Tam

May 15th, 2004, 5:46 pm #10

A biology professor once joked "All bears walk in single file, at least the one I saw did." It means nothing that one particular individual was an exception to the rule. Not all smokers get lung cancer and some non-smokers do get lung cancer. However, it is well-established that smoking increases the RATE of lung cancer. You might be able to walk across an Interstate highway with your eyes closed and survive, but that doesn't prove that there is no connection with such activity and health risk. Exceptions and averages are two very different things. Many many studies have shown a connection between breastfeeding and inproved average health risks of both mother and child. Many of these are discussed at that wonderful site www.007b.com
well, I also think in my case, the heredity factor overruled the breastfed factor. My grandmother, mother,and father (all of whom were breast fed) have high cholesterol. So you can understand my being skeptical.
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