At work

At work

John Bayko
John Bayko

February 22nd, 2006, 12:21 am #1

I'm going to start this as a new thread:

Heather Posted Feb 21, 2006 3:54 AM:

"You can still be braless and have bouncing boobs and still present yourself in a very professional manner. Sure looks like I did exactly that doesn't it??"


Just to try to get this forum to be a bit more constructive, especially for the few women who might still be reading...

Was the way you dress ever an issue at your workplace? Either officially or unofficially? Were you the subject of remarks about it?

What sort of work environment was it? Fairly casual, or professional? Mostly women, or a balanced mix? Young or older or mixed?

I suppose a number of women assume that "workplace" means "bras", and might not be able to imagine what working without wearing one would even be like. This might be an opportunity to reassure them - or at least raise some of the issues to be expected in that case based on your experience.
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Mike
Mike

February 22nd, 2006, 7:45 am #2

I think all women if they prefer it and have the opportunity should go to work braless because it sure seems to be alot more comfortable and more healthy to do so. Also no employer no matter where you look has any legal right whatsoever to force you to wear a bra and nobody should let them say otherwise. Forcing women to wear bras is invasion of privacy and discrimination and that cant be tolerated. I really dont care how much being braless offends people. If other coworkers dont like it then they have two options, either deal with it or go get another job. Simple as that.
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Joined: February 12th, 2006, 10:05 am

February 22nd, 2006, 10:05 pm #3

This stream is male dominated so far, so I really do hope that a woman's point of view is added soon, but I've got to step in here. As allegedly a HR Professional, I can think of times when employers have to say to a person (male or female) that their dress sense is wrong. Particularly on a health and safety issue. For example, I have worked for HM Prison Service and a colleague told me when he had to send a woman home because of what she was wearing - or not wearing - would have provoked the (male) inmates. I leave the rest of the story to your imagination. And BTW I am told that female inmates are worse!
As much as I support the woman's right not to wear a bra, in certain circumstances a little forethought is necessary and perhaps a compromise considered.
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Bob
Bob

February 22nd, 2006, 11:59 pm #4

I have been told by my employer on occasion that I can't dress too casually. They prefer to see me in dark pants, a dress shirt and tie. There is absolutely nothing revealing about the casual way I dress at times, but the organization wants me to represent it in a professional fashion, and they think that means more formal and less casual. And, as you noted, they have that right.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 23rd, 2006, 12:49 am #5

This stream is male dominated so far, so I really do hope that a woman's point of view is added soon, but I've got to step in here. As allegedly a HR Professional, I can think of times when employers have to say to a person (male or female) that their dress sense is wrong. Particularly on a health and safety issue. For example, I have worked for HM Prison Service and a colleague told me when he had to send a woman home because of what she was wearing - or not wearing - would have provoked the (male) inmates. I leave the rest of the story to your imagination. And BTW I am told that female inmates are worse!
As much as I support the woman's right not to wear a bra, in certain circumstances a little forethought is necessary and perhaps a compromise considered.
Well, as I've noted before, what is considered appropriate workwear is not carved in stone but varies over time and place. Knee-high skirts which are typical office wear today would have been scandalous a few generations ago. Someday brafreedom will likely be accepted as knee-high skirts are. It won't happen overnight, but just as skirts rose inch by inch, it can be done. Heather, who posted her experience down below is a good example of that. She even went to her job interview brafree and was hired. With more women like her brafreedom will one day be taken for granted.

And Bob, there was a time when men were expected to wear stiff collars, vests and spats at the office, so it even changes for men.
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peter
peter

February 23rd, 2006, 3:12 am #6

I have been told by my employer on occasion that I can't dress too casually. They prefer to see me in dark pants, a dress shirt and tie. There is absolutely nothing revealing about the casual way I dress at times, but the organization wants me to represent it in a professional fashion, and they think that means more formal and less casual. And, as you noted, they have that right.
Precisely why I enjoy working for myself.
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John Bayko
John Bayko

February 23rd, 2006, 3:41 am #7

I have been told by my employer on occasion that I can't dress too casually. They prefer to see me in dark pants, a dress shirt and tie. There is absolutely nothing revealing about the casual way I dress at times, but the organization wants me to represent it in a professional fashion, and they think that means more formal and less casual. And, as you noted, they have that right.
Presentation is one thing, but have you ever had complaints about your underwear?

If you were given a "standard" lace panty and told that's part of the new dress code, would you have a little bit of a problem with that?
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Joined: February 12th, 2006, 10:05 am

February 23rd, 2006, 8:07 pm #8

I have been told by my employer on occasion that I can't dress too casually. They prefer to see me in dark pants, a dress shirt and tie. There is absolutely nothing revealing about the casual way I dress at times, but the organization wants me to represent it in a professional fashion, and they think that means more formal and less casual. And, as you noted, they have that right.
Ethically, they can only do that in restricted circumstances like a health and safety issue, as I've said, or if you've agreed to a dress code, and picking up on John Bayko's point, that should never dictate what kickers you should wear, frilly or otherwise. Oh sorry… was I being serious then! But going off message for a moment Bob, are you saying that your employers let you wear casual clothes when you want to, until you have to meet clients, etc. when they put peer pressure on you to conform. That sounds like a confusing message to me. Surely they should say that they want you either 'suited and booted' every day or not at all. Then again, may be it wasn't so far off. Women must feel a little confused about whether they should or should not wear a bra in the office because, although its not anybody else's business if they are or aren't, our society - UK and US - have such daft ideas about what a woman's breasts are for.

This stream is still being dominated by us blokes. Does that suggest to you that this issue doesn't really exist for women? Look at the stream about breast feeding in public, far more interest.
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Boreas
Boreas

February 23rd, 2006, 8:43 pm #9

I'm going to start this as a new thread:

Heather Posted Feb 21, 2006 3:54 AM:

"You can still be braless and have bouncing boobs and still present yourself in a very professional manner. Sure looks like I did exactly that doesn't it??"


Just to try to get this forum to be a bit more constructive, especially for the few women who might still be reading...

Was the way you dress ever an issue at your workplace? Either officially or unofficially? Were you the subject of remarks about it?

What sort of work environment was it? Fairly casual, or professional? Mostly women, or a balanced mix? Young or older or mixed?

I suppose a number of women assume that "workplace" means "bras", and might not be able to imagine what working without wearing one would even be like. This might be an opportunity to reassure them - or at least raise some of the issues to be expected in that case based on your experience.
I think it is totally possible to be dressed professionally and be bra-free at the same time. Of course, that does not mean wearing a small halter top or tank top. Some women wear suit jackets and tailored shirts and are bra-free. I have some sweaters that I can wear and be bra-free.

I think deportment, or how you carry yourself goes a long way as well. Some people can wear expensive tailored suits and still manage to look dishevelled or sleezy.

Being professional or work appropriate is more than just wearing or not wearing a bra.

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Joined: February 12th, 2006, 10:05 am

February 23rd, 2006, 9:20 pm #10

That's us told fellas! See it is a non-issue for women. End of discussion?
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