Ageism reins strong

Ageism reins strong

Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 17th, 2008, 11:11 pm #1

I often read teen forums to see what young people think about things. One thing which impresses me is their almost total lack of discrimination when it comes to race, gender, sexual orientation and religion and anyone who makes a discriminatory remark along these lines is quickly slapped down.

Unfortunately this unbigoted attitude doesn't extend to ageism- where I see many put-downs of old people. In fact the main reason young people are so pro-Obama has nothing to do with his politics but the fact that McCain is "old".

This doesn't bode well for me since I'm clearly on the wrong side of 60 and I just hope that when all these young people take control of the government they don't send us old people off to some bad place.
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Brandon
Brandon

October 18th, 2008, 12:57 am #2

Ever seen the 1968 campy film "Wild In The Streets?"
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 18th, 2008, 1:57 am #3

No, I haven't, but while I'm sure there has been ageism in every generation I don't think it was as vehement back when I was young as it is now. In fact, I always worked around people who were older than me and respected their experience and wisdom. Frankly I identified with them more than those my age at the time who I regarded as immature and irresponsible. I'm more of a hippie now than I was back then.
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Brandon
Brandon

October 18th, 2008, 2:19 am #4

The movie about a Jim Morrison like rock star who gets elected president of the U.S. after the voting age is lowered to 14.
He then puts everyone over 35 in prison camps and forces them to ingest LSD.

Pretty dated and campy looking 40 years later.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 18th, 2008, 2:41 am #5

35 huh? well I don't have a chance.
I'll tell you- who knows what can happen in the future. I think our economic situation is much worse than many people think- sure- they know things are bad right now- but we have had recessions and stock crashes before- and in a year or so things are back to normal. Sorry folks- I don't think it's going to happen this time and a lot of people are going to be in great distress in the future unable to find jobs and who knows what may happen. Anarchy? It's not so far fetched anymore.
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cool beans boi
cool beans boi

October 18th, 2008, 4:09 am #6

Nat, didn't your generation say "never trust anyone over 30" ?
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 18th, 2008, 4:57 am #7

Yeah, I heard that. You hear a lot of things, but I think as a rule this wasn't a pervasive opinion of my generation. We weren't all long-hair drugged out hippies marching in the streets.

Kids in general still had respect for older people- you still heard some say "yes sir" and "thankyou". Maybe not like in previous generations because things were changing- but today's kids would laugh at the idea of doing that.
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Jeffrey
Jeffrey

October 18th, 2008, 2:49 pm #8

I often read teen forums to see what young people think about things. One thing which impresses me is their almost total lack of discrimination when it comes to race, gender, sexual orientation and religion and anyone who makes a discriminatory remark along these lines is quickly slapped down.

Unfortunately this unbigoted attitude doesn't extend to ageism- where I see many put-downs of old people. In fact the main reason young people are so pro-Obama has nothing to do with his politics but the fact that McCain is "old".

This doesn't bode well for me since I'm clearly on the wrong side of 60 and I just hope that when all these young people take control of the government they don't send us old people off to some bad place.
I agree with your statement and sentiment. However, with Sarah Palin hanging in the wings and McCain possibly being the oldest man elected president in the US' history, I'm not sure a bit of ageism isn't appropriate. Every young person, as well as all middle-aged people, need to clearly assess McCain's health before casting their ballot. I'm scared! And whether elected or not, I wish John McCain decades of further good health.
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Bob
Bob

October 18th, 2008, 3:21 pm #9

I often read teen forums to see what young people think about things. One thing which impresses me is their almost total lack of discrimination when it comes to race, gender, sexual orientation and religion and anyone who makes a discriminatory remark along these lines is quickly slapped down.

Unfortunately this unbigoted attitude doesn't extend to ageism- where I see many put-downs of old people. In fact the main reason young people are so pro-Obama has nothing to do with his politics but the fact that McCain is "old".

This doesn't bode well for me since I'm clearly on the wrong side of 60 and I just hope that when all these young people take control of the government they don't send us old people off to some bad place.
Nat, I know what you mean and agree in some respects. But, I also think the disdain of the young for their elders (and it goes the other way too) is something that each generation (at least in modern history) has experienced. Back when I was a youngster, I looked upon my parents as fairly capable, but my grandparents much less so, for obvious reasons. My parents were working and providing for the family . . the source of cars to drive and extra cash for having fun with my friends. But, my grandparents just sort of sat around and watched TV or puttered in the garden. There wasn't much for me to talk about with them . . and they seemed worried and on-edge much of the time . . not real fun company. And, they were frail, and they had very little money for birthday or Christmas gifts. I loved them because they were my family . . and grandma could make some good cookies! . . but that was about it.

Even though I respected my parents and depended upon them for so many things, I didn't value their opinions on hardly anything: not regarding my choice of clothes or how long my hair should be, not regarding my choice of friends or what classes I should take in high school, not regarding which cars were "hot", which movies were worth seeing, and not regarding what constituted good music. If anything, I got worried if my choices and those of my parents were too similar -- some vague feeling that I've lost the proper path and need to find it again quick! I would not have imagined dressing in clothes like my father wore, or associating with people my parents enjoyed visiting with, or listening to music that my parents enjoyed. Yuck!!

Jump to today: My nephew and sons often share their music with me, as there is considerable overlap in music we all like. When I go to music concerts, I often see three generations of people in the audience (can you imagine attending a concert back in 1970 and seeing that? Didn't happen). My sons borrow clothes (mostly ties and shoes, occasionally a shirt) to wear for special occasions (including job interviews) . . and sometimes even like clothes I pick out for them. They ask me to play video games with them and their friends (I occasionally do -- suck at them tho). We discuss situations they face and they seem to want to hear my take on them and my suggestions (I don't recall valuing my parents' advice much, though I heard it and came to value it more as I got older and saw the truth in it).

The one area were I feel old now is my relationships with women. Youth is everything in the dating world, and not only do 20-somethings steer clear, but even women closer to my age often prefer the attentions of younger men. In my Dad's day, he'd look at younger women but didn't comment or seem to entertain any thought that a young woman would respond positively to a flirtation. In my youth, there was no way that I'd be interested in a woman 20 years my senior (though I did briefly date a 36 y/o when I was 24), so I understand the reasctions of young women toward me now. But, in my heart I still feel young, so I like to be able to flirt with a younger female and not have her be repulsed. That "acceptance" occasionally happens (maybe they just think, "Let the old guy have his fun."), but over the years its gotten more rare. As I posted before, a presenter at a seminar said he "lost his gender" when he reached his 50's and it was both a shock and dismaying for him -- what a character on the TV show "Thirty-Something" called "Invisible to teenage girls." That happens to both men and women as we age, but its one of the enduring and less enjoyable aspects of aging (I tell my sons, their friends, any young people -- including the young girls who give me the cold shoulder -- "Enjoy your youth, cause one day you'll be older and people won't want to flirt with you anymore." Yeah . . I'm a bummer! lol)

sorry . . . . too long again . . . .
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Bob
Bob

October 18th, 2008, 3:31 pm #10

I agree with your statement and sentiment. However, with Sarah Palin hanging in the wings and McCain possibly being the oldest man elected president in the US' history, I'm not sure a bit of ageism isn't appropriate. Every young person, as well as all middle-aged people, need to clearly assess McCain's health before casting their ballot. I'm scared! And whether elected or not, I wish John McCain decades of further good health.
be THAT bad? . . that people would fear it? How could it be worse than what we have right now, with all these "experienced" politicians at the helm: Global economic meltdown; U.S.' loss of industrial base, and out-sourcing of jobs overseas; Almost non-existent borders, with anyone coming in at will and undercutting pay scales by their willingness to work for peanuts; Endless wars in Iraq and Afghanistan that are further bankrupting a bankrupt nation, and with no apparent good options for withdrawl; A very large and aging "Baby Boomer" population that hopes to retire and increasingly needs expensive medical and long-term care, that will have to be paid by a smaller group of younger workers, who themselves face layoffs and job elimination through down-sizing, and who have bleak prospects for their own elder/retirement age; Foreign countries increasingly owning America; The populace divided (by plan, I believe) on so many issues and stalemating toward paralysis.

How can Palin, or any one person, screw up an already immensely screwed up situation?
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