1968

1968

Brandon
Brandon

May 4th, 2008, 9:23 pm #1

1968 is one of my favorite years for music, movies and tv.

It is also perhaps with the exception of one of the years around the time of the Civil War, the most turbulent year in American history.

But if we think it was rough here, you should read about May of 1968 in France when the country really was close to having a total revolution.
I'd be interested in Marseil's take on those events.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 5th, 2008, 12:29 am #2

Yes, I remember '68 well. First and only time I became involved in a political campaign- for Eugene McCarthy.
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Marseil
Marseil

May 5th, 2008, 7:14 pm #3

1968 is one of my favorite years for music, movies and tv.

It is also perhaps with the exception of one of the years around the time of the Civil War, the most turbulent year in American history.

But if we think it was rough here, you should read about May of 1968 in France when the country really was close to having a total revolution.
I'd be interested in Marseil's take on those events.
As it is the 40th anniversary of "the events", the celebration is all over the place now.

A not too bad recollection of events is here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_1968_in_France
And, more interesting, a series of slogans is here: http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Slogans_of ... _in_France

The government did not collapse at this time for a series of reasons:
. No real unity between the students, the extreme leftists, and the, then powerful, Communist Party and the CGT (communist affiliated trade Union).
. The students did not ask for power. The initial reason for the first demonstration was to allow male students into female dorms in universities! This is far from asking for overthrowing the Republic!
. The Extreme leftists were not organized to take power. The y were ready for trouble, or for terrorism (like the RAF in Germany or the BR in Italy), but not to come into power.
. Moscow was not ready to support the Communist Party and the CGT if they wanted to overthrow the government.

May 68 has been the way France has found to go through all the changes of the 60's decade at once. Someone said "The French hate changes. This is why they make revolutions".

Marseil.



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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 5th, 2008, 10:33 pm #4

I guess there was just something in the air back then- 1968- and that era in general from '67-70 was just a very rebellious turbulent period all over the world. Seems like everyone was protesting about something- blacks, feminists, Indians, gays, potheads, peaceniks, nudeniks, etc. If you weren't carrying a sign protesting about something you just weren't with it. I never saw so much change take place in society in such a short time. It certainly was an exciting time- I don't expect to ever see anything like it again. Certainly not from today's youth.
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Bob
Bob

May 6th, 2008, 5:34 pm #5

. . the other day, when I heard a commentator complain about the lethargy and conformity of today's youth compared to the 1960's. Considering my own sons, I would agree they are much more interested in having fun with friends and accessing the latest gadgets than with social causes.

But (I thought), lest we think that youth 40 years ago were so much more aware and perceptive, consider how different the times then and now. In the 1960's, Americans were riding high the wave of prosperity that grew post WWII. Their parents were the "conformists", made the money and gave the kids opportunities (and material possessions) the parents wished they'd been able to have as children. In a word, the Baby Boomers sort of grew up "spoiled". Into that, the youthful rebellion was (sort of -- not really) a reputiation of materialism and social injustice. Frankly, we were able to be so comfortable in our prosperity that would could condemn it without feeling threat.

Compare to today: A country where drugs and crime are everywhere (especially in the news). Where intact families and familiar neighbors are replaced by fratured families and anonimity. "Don't talk to strangers" and the feeling you can't trust anyone or anything. A country whose wealth and polish has been largely replaced by debt and tarnish. You seek education, but where are the jobs? You don't get comfortable as the Baby Boomers could/did -- you know life might be a struggle or, at least, much less certain. While there are still some "isms" around to get some fired up, the great social causes have largely been fought: Women today are out-educating and gradually out-earning men. The black middle class has left behind its own poor. Gays are close to getting parity with straights. There just aren't the noble battles to be fought. Today, its about, "What will my life be like? Will it/I be okay?"

Like I said, different times . . . different responses.
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 6th, 2008, 10:56 pm #6

Yes, and I think that in many cases people now see the down side to many of those struggles- that getting what they wanted didn't solve all their problems and even created new ones.

And I think the draft was a big factor in spurring activism of youth then- it was bad enough that the Vietnam war dragged on year after year but when every day you dreaded opening your mailbox for fear there was a draft notice in it you became very interested in politics and who's making decisions that control your life and could even end it.
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Brandon
Brandon

May 7th, 2008, 2:42 pm #7


Here's WLS in Chicago's Top 40 for this week in 1968. Times might have been tense, but the music sure was fun.


THIS WEEK MAY 6, 1968 LAST WEEK

* 1. Mony Mony Tommy James/Shondells-Roulette 2
2. Honey Bobby Goldsboro-U. A. 1
* 3. Tighten Up Archie Bell & Drells-Atalntic 3
* 4. Beautiful Morning The Rascals-Atlantic 4
* 5. The Good, The Bad, The Ugly Hugo Montenegro-R.C.A. 5
* 6. Hey, Girl, My Girl Bobby Vee-Liberty 10
7. The Unicorn Irish Rovers-Decca 7
* 8. Take Good Care Of My Baby Bobby Vinton-Epic 19
* 9. Cowboys To Girls The Intruders-Gamble 16
*10. Yummy, Yummy, Yummy Ohio Express-Buddah 30
11. Funky Street Arthur Conely-Atco 11
12. U. S. Male Elvis Presley-R.C.A. 12
13. I Got The Feelin' James Brown-King 6
14. Ain't No Way Aretha Franklin-Atlantic 14
*15. Jennifer Eccles Hollies-Epic 22
16. Cry Like A Baby Box Tops-Mala 8
17. She's Lookin' Good Wilson Pickett-Atlantic 17
18. Shoo-Be-Doo-Be-Doo-Da-Day Stevie Wonder-Tamla 21
19. Lady Madonna Beatles-Capital 15
20. Young Girl Union Gap-Columbia 9
*21. Do You Know The Way To San Jose Dionne Warwick-Scepter 26
22. Look To Your Soul Johnny Rivers-Imperial 23
*23. Mrs. Robinson Simon & Garfunkel-Columbia 36
24. Delilah Tom Jones-Parrot 25
25. Soul Serenade Willie Mitchell-Hi 27
26. Call Me Lightning The Who-Decca 28
*27. Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing-Marvin Gaye/Tammmi Terrell-Tamla 29
28. Goodbye Baby Tommy Boyce/Bobby Hart-A & M 31
*29. Master Jack 4 Jacks & A Jill-R.C.A. 37
*30. The Happy Song Otis Redding-Volt 40
*31. A Man Without Love Englebert Humperdinck-Parrot 34
32. Wear It On Your Face The Dells-Cadet 32
33. Does Your Mama Know Bobby Taylor & Vancouvers-Gordy 39
34. I Wanna Live Glen Campbell-Capital 38
35. If I Were A Carpenter Four Tops-Motown --
36. I Could Never Love Another Temptations-Gordy --
37. How Did We Ever Get This Way Andy Kim-Steed --
*38. Brooklyn Roads Neil Diamond-Uni --
*39. Mac Arthur Park Richard Harris-Dunhill --
*40. Reach Out Of The Darkness Friend & Lover-Verve --
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 7th, 2008, 5:52 pm #8

We all know that the 1960s was the golden age for pop music. One great song after another.
I think everyone who remembers those days looks at the crap out now and wonders- "What happen?" Where did the magic go? I think the last decent music disappeared in the 1980s- along with good music videos. You hardly see music videos anymore- and what there are pale in comparison with those of the '80s. Just seems that the quality of everything in our culture is on a downward slide.




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Bob
Bob

May 7th, 2008, 10:51 pm #9

I think the telling sign is all those remakes of old movies and the "cover song" albums (some of which are pretty good). It tells me that (as my father used to say), "People today cannot write, act or sing like they did" (in his day). When I was young, I disagreed with him, attributing it to bias for one's own era. But, I really see how the quality of so many forms of entertainment has declined. Maybe its cyclical and we'll bounce back in a future generation. We can hope. If its true that creativity arises out of struggle . . with the current troubles we face, maybe we are due for a cultural renaissance!
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Nat
Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 8th, 2008, 1:04 am #10

It's easy to blame generation bias when it comes to music, but I don't think that true in my case. I enjoy big band music from the '40s and even the '30s stuff. And I was a regular fan of pop music right through into the 1980s. I even liked some of the early rap stuff because it was new and different- but it got old very fast- the same old thing over and over. It's hard to tell one rap song from another. It's not even music really- just people reciting lyrics to a monotonous repetitive beat.
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