Mrs. Beasley

Mrs. Beasley

Joined: March 26th, 2007, 10:07 pm

May 23rd, 2007, 6:38 pm #1

Can anyone tell me what was the history of this doll?

I am a couple years younger than Anissa, and I remember "Buffy" porting this toy around and talking to it on the show.

I never cared for Mrs. Beasley and didn't understand her appeal to the Buffy character.

I remember thinking it strange that there was a doll that: (1) was called "Mrs." and, (2) was an older woman (NOT that there's anything wrong with that, so please don't flame me!).

I had a stage in my childhood when I too was into stuffed animals and dolls. but the dolls I played with (with the exception of Barbie), were more infantile in character. If anything, Mrs. Beasley seemed to be an older woman made to look infantile, unlike the Barbie dolls of that era!

Was Mrs. Beasley supposed to be a kind of substitute mother prop for Buffy, since she and her "brother" were supposed to have been orphans on the show, who were then adopted by a secondary father figure?

I'd appreciate seeing some perspectives on this.



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Claude
Claude

May 23rd, 2007, 7:33 pm #2


I always thought that Mrs. Beasley provided a ray of hope for Buffy.
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M.
M.

May 24th, 2007, 1:14 am #3

Can anyone tell me what was the history of this doll?

I am a couple years younger than Anissa, and I remember "Buffy" porting this toy around and talking to it on the show.

I never cared for Mrs. Beasley and didn't understand her appeal to the Buffy character.

I remember thinking it strange that there was a doll that: (1) was called "Mrs." and, (2) was an older woman (NOT that there's anything wrong with that, so please don't flame me!).

I had a stage in my childhood when I too was into stuffed animals and dolls. but the dolls I played with (with the exception of Barbie), were more infantile in character. If anything, Mrs. Beasley seemed to be an older woman made to look infantile, unlike the Barbie dolls of that era!

Was Mrs. Beasley supposed to be a kind of substitute mother prop for Buffy, since she and her "brother" were supposed to have been orphans on the show, who were then adopted by a secondary father figure?

I'd appreciate seeing some perspectives on this.


I never understood the appeal of Mrs. Beasley either. But then again, I never understood the appeal of Raggedy Ann and Andy.

I was also playing with Barbies at the time. I would have to agree that if you were to analyze it I guess she was a substitute mother/grandmother.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 24th, 2007, 9:08 am #4

This was explained.If I remember correctly,In the final season. Sissy tells Uncle Bill that with the death of her parents, and the confusion of being unwanted,that Mrs.Beasley was the only protection and using a little social Darwinism,the doll was a "being" of self,want and comfort for Buffy.
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Joined: March 26th, 2007, 10:07 pm

May 24th, 2007, 3:48 pm #5

"This was explained.If I remember correctly,In the final season"

Interesting they waited that long to address this.

Thanks to all for your input.

KH
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SGT
SGT

May 29th, 2007, 2:14 am #6

Can anyone tell me what was the history of this doll?

I am a couple years younger than Anissa, and I remember "Buffy" porting this toy around and talking to it on the show.

I never cared for Mrs. Beasley and didn't understand her appeal to the Buffy character.

I remember thinking it strange that there was a doll that: (1) was called "Mrs." and, (2) was an older woman (NOT that there's anything wrong with that, so please don't flame me!).

I had a stage in my childhood when I too was into stuffed animals and dolls. but the dolls I played with (with the exception of Barbie), were more infantile in character. If anything, Mrs. Beasley seemed to be an older woman made to look infantile, unlike the Barbie dolls of that era!

Was Mrs. Beasley supposed to be a kind of substitute mother prop for Buffy, since she and her "brother" were supposed to have been orphans on the show, who were then adopted by a secondary father figure?

I'd appreciate seeing some perspectives on this.


I remember visiting my Aunt & Uncle's home when I was five years old...I was totally creeped out by that doll.....My cousin had told me that she was afraid of the doll but was forced to play it, (Mrs Beasley was a gift from a grandparent)....We cut a small hole in Mrs Beasley's body, afterwards we stuffed some hamburger meat and some chicken into the hole and gave MRs BEasly to the family dog... We still talk about how the dog just ripped the doll to pieces in front of my aunt....All that was left was her head with her bi-focals.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

May 29th, 2007, 2:30 am #7

LOL! That is pretty funny. I have to agree with you on that. Mrs. Beasley was one creepy looking doll.
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diane
diane

May 30th, 2012, 7:03 pm #8

"This was explained.If I remember correctly,In the final season"

Interesting they waited that long to address this.

Thanks to all for your input.

KH
It was addressed in the second season when Jody and Buffy were playing with Mrs. Beasley and her arm accidentally was pulled off. Uncle Bill had to explain it to his associates at work when he left early to go home and take care of Mrs. Beasley's broken arm matter.
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Bill Ratekin
Bill Ratekin

May 31st, 2012, 2:29 am #9

LOL! That is pretty funny. I have to agree with you on that. Mrs. Beasley was one creepy looking doll.
I have performed "Anissa Jones " Several times with only an accoustic and a harmonizer and Mrs Beasley always goes on stage with me for that song.
if she is not with me I won't play it.


Bill Ratekin
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Joined: May 30th, 2012, 11:47 am

May 31st, 2012, 2:52 am #10

touching. adds poignancy and sincerity to the song.
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