can there be "closure" to a tragedy?

can there be "closure" to a tragedy?

new york fan
new york fan

April 30th, 2012, 2:53 am #1

in my humble opinion there are no more vulgar and obscene words in the psycho-babble of our day, than "closure" and "self-esteem". may God save us from "closure" and "self-esteem". i believe it was jorge luis borges who said something to the effect, "what a sad thing it was when the mythology of freud displaced the ancient and true mythology of the greeks."

matthew arnold in a famous preface to his poems wrote, "what then are the situations, from the representations of which, though accurate, no poetical enjoyment [or possibly salvation] can be derived? they are those in which the suffering finds no vent in action; in which a continuous state of mental distress is prolonged, unrelieved by incident, hope, or resistance; in which there is everything to be endured, nothing to be done."

is this not the very definition of tragedy? is this not the essence of Anissa's story? there is no closure or salvation to the morning of saturday august 28, 1976. there is only a continuous state of mental distress prolonged, unrelieved by incident, hope, or resistance; in which there is everything to be endured, nothing to be done.

this is why we can not, nor dare, forget Anissa.
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Bill Ratekin
Bill Ratekin

April 30th, 2012, 4:02 am #2

Nice.




Bill Ratekin
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Chase
Chase

April 30th, 2012, 5:47 am #3

in my humble opinion there are no more vulgar and obscene words in the psycho-babble of our day, than "closure" and "self-esteem". may God save us from "closure" and "self-esteem". i believe it was jorge luis borges who said something to the effect, "what a sad thing it was when the mythology of freud displaced the ancient and true mythology of the greeks."

matthew arnold in a famous preface to his poems wrote, "what then are the situations, from the representations of which, though accurate, no poetical enjoyment [or possibly salvation] can be derived? they are those in which the suffering finds no vent in action; in which a continuous state of mental distress is prolonged, unrelieved by incident, hope, or resistance; in which there is everything to be endured, nothing to be done."

is this not the very definition of tragedy? is this not the essence of Anissa's story? there is no closure or salvation to the morning of saturday august 28, 1976. there is only a continuous state of mental distress prolonged, unrelieved by incident, hope, or resistance; in which there is everything to be endured, nothing to be done.

this is why we can not, nor dare, forget Anissa.
NYF,

I can't help but feel that this is directed at my recent post for use of the world "closure," and while I certainly understand the sentiment, I must agree with Wolf that not allowing yourself to move on from a death - regardless of whether it was that of a loved one or stranger - is ultimately not in your best interest.

I would never want Anissa to be forgotten. It's at the forefront of my mind to keep her legacy alive and unearth as many concrete facts about her last days as possible. And given our infatuation with celebrity and death and celebrity death, especially here in Los Angeles, I don't think Anissa's story is in jeopardy of losing its impact. If anything, as you can attest yourself, the advent of the Internet has only increased the visibility of her tragedy, more so than when it made fleeting headlines back in 1976. Each co-worker, family member, and friend about whom I tell Anissa's story is immediately familiar with at least her name and her role as Buffy.

By closure, however, I mean the resolution of a feeling that I think you'll understand better than anyone else here. It nags at me, it truly does, that Anissa's searches for love, for acceptance, for a purpose, for a meaningful relationship all ended so tragically and coldly. Not since last year when this story piqued my interest has a single day gone by in which I haven't thought of Anissa. I think of that night at Littler Lane, what I wouldn't give to know exactly what went on in the most objective, factual sense possible. I wonder what those post-F.A. years were truly like beyond the conjecture and recollection of trusted colleagues and friends. I wonder all manner of things about the mysteries of death.

Those questions, unfortunately, will never be answered. Thus, I have two choices. I can uphold my respect and sympathy for Anissa Jones and keep trying to put her story to prose while accepting that certain devastating facts and questions will never be reconciled. Or I can elect to let the abject sadness of her story envelope me to the point where I enter depression and will myself to never seek what some wisely allude to as "closure." That latter option is not where you'll find Anissa.

I respect your eloquence and intellect, NYF, I really do. You are by leaps and bounds my favorite poster here. So please let me say from my own experience that holding on to such irreconcilable sadness is a dead-end road. Death, whether it's 36 minutes, days, or years later, is a terrible inevitably that we all must accept and overcome. It does not, however, mean that those who've gone before are forgotten.

- Chase
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What a loser
What a loser

April 30th, 2012, 2:17 pm #4

chase you actually spend that much time thinking about some girl you never met LOL what a loser. LOL there are people who are actually alive but maybe you only like them dead. no one would read your book loser. you should have just stayed off the board, enough weirdos here already LOL
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Bill Ratekin
Bill Ratekin

April 30th, 2012, 4:08 pm #5

Chase don't take the bait, don't worry about it. just move on.

Bill Ratekin
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Chase
Chase

April 30th, 2012, 9:37 pm #6

No worries, Bill. But thank you. I admittedly did not even read the response to my post based on the name of the poster.
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Wolf McCarron's Bum Chum
Wolf McCarron's Bum Chum

May 1st, 2012, 2:30 am #7

I like NYF a lot and hope he is not in a whirlpool of depression longing for someone who died long ago. life is for the living, to share and reciprocate with. i'd draw the line with the likes of 'noneya', just nasty garbage that one.
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new york fan
new york fan

May 2nd, 2012, 5:05 am #8

NYF,

I can't help but feel that this is directed at my recent post for use of the world "closure," and while I certainly understand the sentiment, I must agree with Wolf that not allowing yourself to move on from a death - regardless of whether it was that of a loved one or stranger - is ultimately not in your best interest.

I would never want Anissa to be forgotten. It's at the forefront of my mind to keep her legacy alive and unearth as many concrete facts about her last days as possible. And given our infatuation with celebrity and death and celebrity death, especially here in Los Angeles, I don't think Anissa's story is in jeopardy of losing its impact. If anything, as you can attest yourself, the advent of the Internet has only increased the visibility of her tragedy, more so than when it made fleeting headlines back in 1976. Each co-worker, family member, and friend about whom I tell Anissa's story is immediately familiar with at least her name and her role as Buffy.

By closure, however, I mean the resolution of a feeling that I think you'll understand better than anyone else here. It nags at me, it truly does, that Anissa's searches for love, for acceptance, for a purpose, for a meaningful relationship all ended so tragically and coldly. Not since last year when this story piqued my interest has a single day gone by in which I haven't thought of Anissa. I think of that night at Littler Lane, what I wouldn't give to know exactly what went on in the most objective, factual sense possible. I wonder what those post-F.A. years were truly like beyond the conjecture and recollection of trusted colleagues and friends. I wonder all manner of things about the mysteries of death.

Those questions, unfortunately, will never be answered. Thus, I have two choices. I can uphold my respect and sympathy for Anissa Jones and keep trying to put her story to prose while accepting that certain devastating facts and questions will never be reconciled. Or I can elect to let the abject sadness of her story envelope me to the point where I enter depression and will myself to never seek what some wisely allude to as "closure." That latter option is not where you'll find Anissa.

I respect your eloquence and intellect, NYF, I really do. You are by leaps and bounds my favorite poster here. So please let me say from my own experience that holding on to such irreconcilable sadness is a dead-end road. Death, whether it's 36 minutes, days, or years later, is a terrible inevitably that we all must accept and overcome. It does not, however, mean that those who've gone before are forgotten.

- Chase
WOW! thank you Chase! beautifully written, beautifully expressed. i hope you succeed in telling Anissa's story in an unforgettable and timeless way. not just because Anissa deserves it, but because her story is supremely a story to be told and heard. a supreme invitation for a talented, sensitive writer, to tell a timeless, transcendent story.

welcome back!
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