happy

happy

Joined: September 24th, 2005, 6:53 pm

February 4th, 2012, 3:17 am #1

If indeed M. Sullivan is no longer employed at Suspended Animation, I regret his unfortunate situation, but am happy that this is at least one thing he cannot blame me for.
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Joined: September 16th, 2010, 2:14 pm

February 8th, 2012, 3:50 pm #2

Obviously something is going on here that the rest of us are not going to be privy to.

Matthew, thank you for your service to the cryonics community. Best wishes to you in your future endeavors, and may you live an extremely long life.
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Joined: November 30th, 2005, 4:41 am

March 27th, 2012, 10:39 am #3

Thanks Fundie:)

My apology for the late replay. Life is keeping me busy these days.

I'm grateful for my hiatus from cryonics, and it has helped me to appreciate what started out as one passion in life and turned into two. Maybe the risky action on my part to bring cryonics to the masses was not a realistic approach at this point, but at least I brought the love of a woman into my life and I am as grateful as most anyone guy could be.

Here is my dedication to my first and more recent passion in my life:

http://youtu.be/dGghkjpNCQ8

After being connected with cryonics since 1994, the best advice that I could provide anyone new is do not look to the establishment to make real progress. They are too old and can't think outside the box, short of maintaining the current status of taking care of those who are already frozen or vitrified.

The primary problem is that there are too many deviating opinions, so if anyone has a solution, you are going to have to figure out how to make it work on your own. If you look to the establishment to make it happen, you could easily spend years or decades of wasting your life in support of making progress.
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Joined: November 30th, 2005, 4:41 am

March 27th, 2012, 12:18 pm #4

Title is by Calvin Harris - Feel So Close

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dGghkjpNCQ8
Last edited by MathewSullivan on March 27th, 2012, 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 16th, 2010, 2:14 pm

March 27th, 2012, 2:04 pm #5

Thanks Fundie:)

My apology for the late replay. Life is keeping me busy these days.

I'm grateful for my hiatus from cryonics, and it has helped me to appreciate what started out as one passion in life and turned into two. Maybe the risky action on my part to bring cryonics to the masses was not a realistic approach at this point, but at least I brought the love of a woman into my life and I am as grateful as most anyone guy could be.

Here is my dedication to my first and more recent passion in my life:

http://youtu.be/dGghkjpNCQ8

After being connected with cryonics since 1994, the best advice that I could provide anyone new is do not look to the establishment to make real progress. They are too old and can't think outside the box, short of maintaining the current status of taking care of those who are already frozen or vitrified.

The primary problem is that there are too many deviating opinions, so if anyone has a solution, you are going to have to figure out how to make it work on your own. If you look to the establishment to make it happen, you could easily spend years or decades of wasting your life in support of making progress.
Hi, Matthew; good to see you back. I'm still personally in the dark about what happened, but it sounds like you are pretty happy with how things wound up.

As far as trusting the establishment versus making it happen on your own, I think cryonics always has been a "make it happen on your own" enterprise. It seems to me that people have been trying for decades to hit critical mass and, with all the signups and people involved, feeling like they are progressing towards it while really they are overestimating the progress made since most people signed up are not really on a "make it happen on your own" wavelength. There are people who are **SERIOUS** about making sure that they get a shot at surviving into the future, and there are people who expect it to be handed to them.

I'm all for a world where cryopreservation and reanimation can be handed to anyone who wants it, but the reality is that at this point in time people who really want to survive have to be as serious about it as the original cryonics pioneers.
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Joined: November 30th, 2005, 4:41 am

March 30th, 2012, 6:21 am #6

All that I'm prepared to say is, I'm feeling a sense of appreciation for the positive events and people in my life. To the extent that I am or will be happy on how things turned out; well, ask me this question again in a couple hundred years if I'm fortunate to be alive. Being that I'm an Alcor member, not dieing outside of Arizona at this point in time and having my memories properly vitrified has the potential to be a positive event.

Can't say that I have any obvious disagreement on your last two paragraphs, but there is a distinction that comes to my mind with Henry Ford's attachment to the Model T. I don't know to what extent the movie I watched in my youth on this subject had been fictionalized, but the movie does remind me of experiences I went through even at the start of my career with his son's interest in innovation.

The clear risk here to the original vision of cryonics is, it has such a narrow focus that it may miss the proverbial train.
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