Am I officially a truck driver yet? Week one finished...

Am I officially a truck driver yet? Week one finished...

Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 6:08 pm #1

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
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Joined: January 19th, 2010, 10:45 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 6:58 pm #2

it seems like a short amount of time has passed and you're on your way to the new career.

All good. I need to reinvent my career as well.

Very interesting, glad to see you're progressing well.

Be safe on them highways.
thx for the updates.
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Joined: September 14th, 2008, 2:21 am

July 23rd, 2011, 7:12 pm #3

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
Takes a lot of courage to grab the bull by the horns and go for it.

I went back to school at 40 and it was the best and hardest thing I ever done for myself.

Kudos to ya sir!

*Never a waste of time to look at a watch*
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Joined: March 1st, 2005, 3:51 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 7:18 pm #4

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
Ive heard about those truck stops! LOL

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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 7:32 pm #5

Who was waving at me in the truck. I thought it would make a funny pic...

This has to be one of the few jobs where if you work 12+ hours for a week they call you a "partimer"... The hours truckers work are pretty insane. You have to really have a desire to fully get into this thing... Even the "local" guys go hundreds and hundreds of kilometers in a day and work 10+ hours per day...

Just heading out the door. Going to the Fergus Truck Show to see some iron...
http://www.fergustruckshow.com/

Now... The tractor pulls and custom trucks are usually the big draw. Me? I want to sit in as many new trucks as possible. It might be cool in 3-4 years to get my own truck and become an owner/operator...

I will see where I am in two years time and will start to look at making that call then... For now I will be a "company driver" and go from there.
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Joined: October 25th, 2005, 9:59 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 7:49 pm #6

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
nt
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Joined: October 29th, 2007, 2:33 pm

July 23rd, 2011, 7:53 pm #7

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
.
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Joined: February 28th, 2006, 10:40 pm

July 31st, 2011, 2:08 am #8

You see the most interesting people out there!


This is a 2006 International Eagle... This is what I see when I am driving...





A view from the deck... Sometimes I am up there to help guide a forklift or because I cannot do what I need or want to do from the ground. I feel like the king of the world when I am up here.


Here is a load of steel that went right down the street from me. They are building a bank a short walk from my house and we went and picked up the steel for the roof and delivered it to the site for the crane to place it for the roofing guys. That is two steel roofs I delievered this week, steel girders for an airplane hanger, and literally tons and tons of lumber, insulation, floowing and all sorts of other cool stuff...



I have learned a lot about load securement. This is something they barely touch on in trucking school. I have had to read an entire textbook this week on it and demonstrate proficiency on the job. Some guys go "pin to pin" and never have to touch or even see their freight (especially if it is sealed). Flatbedders on the other hand are very aware of what they are carrying. Chains and straps to secure the load. Do you use corner protectors or not? How many straps and/or chains and where do you place them? There are forumaltions for this but they do not always work in the real world. More often than not the legal requirements are inadequate due to the shape or the cargo or the road conditions you will encounter.

Not much need to tarp this week but next week that will likely change. All of my runs have been in Ontario and that will likely remain the case for the next two weeks. After that I hit the U.S. for another 2-3 weeks with another mentor and then on my own...

I am actually in an officual apprenticeship program which will take a year. So, including my truck schooling this works out to a 15 month process before I am technically a certified truck driver according to the goveernment. Of course, in reality I am enployed by a trucking company with a licence. However, I am striving to become a professional and that does not happen overnight and continuous improvement is what is called for...

Be safe out there!
First off... Meet a vehicle with 4 pedals...


The pedal to the left of the clutch pedal is actually a foot activated jake brake...


Went to Quebec to pick up OSB boards from a mill. Ran out of hours and spent my first night in the truck...

And the next morning...


Very nice area though...


Now the product is delivered to Tweed, Ontario... Darn rain though! Now I have to take the tarps off in the rain...


Thank goodness I am wearing a watch up to the task...



I was so soaked to the bone after this delivery... I only had one pair of shorts so I spent the rest of the day in my coveralls. Thankfully I had plenty of extra t-shirts, socks, and undies...

I guess I still have more planning to do with respect to supplies etc...
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Joined: June 19th, 2009, 6:51 pm

July 31st, 2011, 2:35 am #9



Images from my years in southern Ontario

------------------------------------------

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Joined: September 1st, 2008, 1:36 pm

July 31st, 2011, 2:36 am #10

First off... Meet a vehicle with 4 pedals...


The pedal to the left of the clutch pedal is actually a foot activated jake brake...


Went to Quebec to pick up OSB boards from a mill. Ran out of hours and spent my first night in the truck...

And the next morning...


Very nice area though...


Now the product is delivered to Tweed, Ontario... Darn rain though! Now I have to take the tarps off in the rain...


Thank goodness I am wearing a watch up to the task...



I was so soaked to the bone after this delivery... I only had one pair of shorts so I spent the rest of the day in my coveralls. Thankfully I had plenty of extra t-shirts, socks, and undies...

I guess I still have more planning to do with respect to supplies etc...
........... >>> you kept one Sawtooth. Tough watch for a tough job. Aren`t you glad you weren`t wearing some Swiss machine on your wrist???

Wanna see some more pics with blonde chicks getting out of the car(s)...possibly NOT your truck. That wouldn`t fly by very well at home

I don`t make things. I make things better !
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