Not Non-sport But Interesting None-the-less

Not Non-sport But Interesting None-the-less

Joined: November 8th, 2006, 2:37 am

July 10th, 2012, 6:39 pm #1

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
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Joined: February 8th, 2007, 4:33 am

July 10th, 2012, 6:54 pm #2

thenks. Only old thing I ever found in the attic was grandma.....
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Joined: September 19th, 2006, 3:37 pm

July 10th, 2012, 6:55 pm #3

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
Wondered when the full story would emerge.......have seen rumblings about the find on the BB side where PSA messed up a PSA8.5 versus PSA10 card and put them in the wrong holders. Just absolutely amazing that there are 16, SIXTEEN, 16 Ty Cobb 9's. A card that previously would have brought $40-$60,000 or more will probably drop in value now that there are so many of them. Still a very very cool find. We all hope to find something like that huh? Neat set is not easy to find any time, much less in these conditions. Will be interesting to see what the best group sells for in Heritage's auction during the National.............
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Joined: February 3rd, 2009, 12:40 am

July 10th, 2012, 7:29 pm #4

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
We found ours in the attic too...got her slabbed PSA NP Authentic...That's "no pulse"

never thought i could come to net54 for humour....no worries i won't quit my day job.
amit
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Joined: May 2nd, 2008, 4:35 am

July 10th, 2012, 11:36 pm #5

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
just kiddin..
Its hard to get your "sports" head around the magnitude of this find. just friggin incredible.
Ya know with every attic,basement,5 & dime closed stores,old mom & pop stores,old card collectors, dealers and any person related to any of the above...Being sought out, searched, searched again...housing turnover,Generations dying off, ebay, thrift stores, Bounty's, Cash Rewards, Advertisments to buy, Buyers coming through small towns (setting up in hotels/motels) taking out ads in local papers...Millions of folks on the Hunt. NOT TO MENTION the card boom of the early 80's with card shops on every corner buying up old folks cards,inherited collections...Virtually a "gold rush" of prospectors looting cards and finding hidden collections,Almost all old warehouses being repurposed , rehabbed, construction workers/laborers finding things under boards, walls, floors...Antiques roadshow and others on TV. Ebay, Yahoo auctions. The new Consignment shop boom of the last decade.
As ralph p mentioned years ago concerning Non Sports: early days of ebay where treasures straight from attic & basement showing up everyday in what seemed like a never ending supply...but the supply did start drying up.
Just hard to imagine that many Pristine Jewels being found AND eventually finding their way to a major auction house together...no pilfering by family, local dealers or a Snake with a fat wallet getting some of these or all First.
Just a great, great find.
I also agree that the $$$ value will go down as a result of sooo many at once 'Known" to exist.
The first rule of finding "lots" of anything...Don't Tell anyone!
But I guess the word had already been heard from many after the news reports.. so, expect less even if "Pete & co. "(heritage) says they are going to auction over years. Supply and demand is still in effect , no matter the time frame.

Congrats to the family and I hope they make a good haul out of this.
Its also nice to see things come to market that were previously unknown.

" Showin the love since 1966 "
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Joined: May 23rd, 2007, 2:52 pm

July 12th, 2012, 5:41 pm #6

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
Is anyone besides me just a tiny bit skeptical that these cards weren't really lost; and the "find" is an excellent method of generating publicity for obtaining the maximum when offered for sale?

Maybe not, certainly interesting "find".

I know anything left that long in our attics would have turned brown from the heat years ago.

Jon.
Last edited by carbking on July 12th, 2012, 5:42 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: September 16th, 2008, 10:17 pm

July 12th, 2012, 6:10 pm #7

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
I believe the story of these cards being found in a family's attic. They found over 700 cards and the best ones have been graded by PSA. They ended up with 16 Ty Cobb cards in PSA 9. There were no Cobbs in that high of a grade on the PSA population report until this "find". Actually a find of these rare cards is more believable than any other explanation I can think of. What other type of conspiracy theory are you proposing?
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Joined: September 16th, 2008, 10:17 pm

July 12th, 2012, 8:06 pm #8

Just heard about this on the radio. Being in Ohio I wanted to know what was going on.

Ohio Card Find
After rereading your message, I started wondering about your assertion that heat made paper turn brown. So I had to look it up. This website was talking about why newspapers turn yellow, but I think it applies to this situation too. It's not the heat, it's the light and oxygen that darkens paper. And since these cards were stored in a box with a lid on it, they were basically in a time capsule as far as the paper was concerned. The article is below:

Paper is made from wood, which is made up mainly of white cellulose. Wood also has a lot of a dark substance in it called lignin, which ends up in the paper, too, along with the cellulose. The exposure of lignin to air and sunlight is what turns paper yellow.

­Lignin makes wood stiff and trees stand upright. You could say it acts as a glue to bind the cellulose fibers together. It is a polymer, a substance that is formed by the joining of simpler molecules into giant molecules that act differently than the smaller molecules did. Dr. Hou-Min Chang, a professor of wood and paper science at N.C. State University in Raleigh, N.C., compares lignin to the concrete used in buildings, with cellulose as the steel frame. Without lignin, Chang says, a tree could only grow to be about 6 feet tall. Lignin also helps protect the wood from pests and other damage.

Newsprint, which must be produced as economically as possible, has more lignin in it than finer papers. At the mill, the wood that will be turned into newsprint is ground up, lignin and all.

Paper manufacturers utilize the benefits of lignin in some types of paper, though. Brown kraft paper, the dark brown paper used in grocery store bags, and cardboard are stiff and sturdy because they have more lignin in them, and because those kinds of paper aren't treated with bleaching chemicals. It doesn't matter how dark they are because the printing on them is limited.

To make a fine white paper, the mill puts the wood through a chemical solvent process, which separates and discards the lignin. Pure cellulose is white, and the paper made from it will be white and will resist yellowing.

Lignin eventually turns paper yellow because of oxidation. That is, the lignin molecules, when exposed to oxygen in the air, begin to change and become less stable. The lignin will absorb more light, giving off a darker color. Chang says that if newsprint were kept completely out of sunlight and air, it would remain white. After only a few hours of sunlight and oxygen, however, it will start to change color.

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