Win and Loose

Win and Loose

M. Chapman
M. Chapman

September 20th, 2000, 10:44 am #1

I have always been hesitant to use products demonstrated on late night TV. And lately it has become increasingly difficult when these same products sell in retial stores, seemingly demonstrating a reliable market base.

At any rate, before trying ZMAX I have had the opportunity to test Dura Lube and Motor Up and Pro Long in a 1980 Honda Prelude. Of all these products Pro Long proved to be the only one which provided long term difference (3 months to the date, thus necessitating the boster with change).

Last year I aquired a 1983 Porsche 944, 185 HP. While I knew the engine was carboned and I wanted to clean it with an addative i was very hesitant. But eventually I used the complete Z Max system. Immediate results were a seemingly quiter engine, smoother idle and lower temp. The gas addative was not enitrely impresive by itself. I find that I have better performance and milage from the Chevron Techron addative. The engine improvment has lasted for about two oil changes, 6 months. I purposely refrained from using a booster to test the longevity of the product. Engine temperature returned to previous levels after three months.

My final assessment is that for older cars, with obvious carbon build up, the product provides some results. Granted a great deal of this was probabaly afforded by vecosity reduction which any product can offer. It should be noted though that this product did indeed remove carbon through the burning process. In fact, I have had to change my catalytic converter recently because of all the carbon which came out of the engine. And to this day, there is still a profuse amount of carbon which is burning out the exaust system.

The end result, with an older car you win and loose. After all, a $50 package which only costs the factory $2 to make will never replace the necessity to keep a car in constant repair. It can make your performance more zippy though.


NOTE: For owners with a manual transmition (dry pressure plate) and rear diffrential drive. I would recommend not adding the transmission fluid to the differential oil. The packaging does not directly address this issue. I believe there is a danger of increasing small leaks or seal seaps by using this product in the differential oil.

:::::I hope my comments have been useful. Follow up questions can be posted to this forum, my e-mail has been pusposely let out to avaoid high and needless traffic.:::::::

M. Chapman
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Charles McGowan
Charles McGowan

October 30th, 2000, 9:07 pm #2

In your text you wrote:
NOTE: For owners with a manual transmition (dry pressure plate) and rear diffrential drive. I would recommend not adding the transmission fluid to the differential oil. The packaging does not directly address this issue. I believe there is a danger of increasing small leaks or seal seaps by using this product in the differential oil.

I have a 1995 Nissan Altima, with a 5sp. manual transmission, do you think that the trans. fluid would hurt mine????
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JoeDoe
JoeDoe

November 6th, 2002, 10:57 pm #3

I have always been hesitant to use products demonstrated on late night TV. And lately it has become increasingly difficult when these same products sell in retial stores, seemingly demonstrating a reliable market base.

At any rate, before trying ZMAX I have had the opportunity to test Dura Lube and Motor Up and Pro Long in a 1980 Honda Prelude. Of all these products Pro Long proved to be the only one which provided long term difference (3 months to the date, thus necessitating the boster with change).

Last year I aquired a 1983 Porsche 944, 185 HP. While I knew the engine was carboned and I wanted to clean it with an addative i was very hesitant. But eventually I used the complete Z Max system. Immediate results were a seemingly quiter engine, smoother idle and lower temp. The gas addative was not enitrely impresive by itself. I find that I have better performance and milage from the Chevron Techron addative. The engine improvment has lasted for about two oil changes, 6 months. I purposely refrained from using a booster to test the longevity of the product. Engine temperature returned to previous levels after three months.

My final assessment is that for older cars, with obvious carbon build up, the product provides some results. Granted a great deal of this was probabaly afforded by vecosity reduction which any product can offer. It should be noted though that this product did indeed remove carbon through the burning process. In fact, I have had to change my catalytic converter recently because of all the carbon which came out of the engine. And to this day, there is still a profuse amount of carbon which is burning out the exaust system.

The end result, with an older car you win and loose. After all, a $50 package which only costs the factory $2 to make will never replace the necessity to keep a car in constant repair. It can make your performance more zippy though.


NOTE: For owners with a manual transmition (dry pressure plate) and rear diffrential drive. I would recommend not adding the transmission fluid to the differential oil. The packaging does not directly address this issue. I believe there is a danger of increasing small leaks or seal seaps by using this product in the differential oil.

:::::I hope my comments have been useful. Follow up questions can be posted to this forum, my e-mail has been pusposely let out to avaoid high and needless traffic.:::::::

M. Chapman
Concerning your advice on the adddition of zMAX to rear diferential: All the cars sold (in USA) with clutches are the dry pressure plate design. I've never seen a car with a wet clutch design. Your rear differetial will not know (or care) whether your car has an auto or standard trans. And whether or not you add zMAX to your differential has nothing to do with any of the factors you mentioned. Will if work in the diff? Maybe, maybe not, but whether it will work or not, will not hinge on whether your car has an auto or manual (dry pressure plate, of course) trans. Now I'm going to go back and read the rest of your post with a little more discerning mind.
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