Epic TwentyEight - Mistress of the Sun - Reports and Discussion

Epic TwentyEight - Mistress of the Sun - Reports and Discussion

Sirian
Sirian

June 9th, 2003, 2:33 am #1

You know the drill: Monday deadline on play, Tuesday for results.

I'm looking forward to reading these reports. I'm curious to learn just how deep of a hole was dug by giving the AI's three settlers to start. I just hope there are more than two reports (Kylearan and Gris) for me to read!


- Sirian
Quote
Share

Joined: September 16th, 2002, 5:17 pm

June 9th, 2003, 4:21 am #2

Report can be found here:

http://sillyputty.is-a-geek.com/civ3/rbciv28-index.html

20k one-city culture in 1926AD. Never attacked a city. As a matter of fact, only one combat ever occurred for me: a vet war chariot vs. a regular French warrior, right next to my capitol, netting me a GA. Played as an OCC. I figured, if Sirian's gonna give 'em three settlers to start, who's to compete with that? I'll show 'em...I'll play with just one city!

Seriously, this was my first OCC game ever, and my first 20k culture victory.

Highlights:
My one city was trailing the Greek capitol of Athens on culture for a good part of the game...yes I was worried.
Eight self-built wonders.
Got into an early phoney war that scored me my GA
Picked a fight with the world's #1 superpower, Rome, in the early industrial era to get a HUGE discount on a tech only Babylon had. Then used that to get a massive gpt income that was combined with alliances with everybody else, who then took Rome outta the game.
An insane amount of warring amongst the AIs from then on, I got into a fair number of wars due to denying tribute demands, getting caught stealing tech or spy-planting (I never got ONE spy planted all game...they always failed on me!)
Scored ALL THREE industrial era wonders, thanks to getting 100 shields per-turn in my city immediately after building a hospital due to having four settlers fortified and waiting to make my city jump to size 20. Used the ToE techs to earn over 25,000g!!!
Nuclear winter descended on the world in 1812 AD, when my computer proceeded to play the nuke sound effect for 45 minutes straight as the AIs flung all the nukes they had at one another, basically blasting each other back into the stone ages. I got hit with one, but rebuilt and grew back up to size quickly. Only lost my colosseum and a couple minor improvements (granary, rax, nuclear plant) to that bomb.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: September 16th, 2002, 5:17 pm

June 9th, 2003, 4:25 am #3

Good thing I tested it right away! Doh!

http://sillyputty.is-a-geek.com/civ3/rb ... index.html

Quote
Like
Share

Griselda
Griselda

June 9th, 2003, 7:48 am #4

You know the drill: Monday deadline on play, Tuesday for results.

I'm looking forward to reading these reports. I'm curious to learn just how deep of a hole was dug by giving the AI's three settlers to start. I just hope there are more than two reports (Kylearan and Gris) for me to read!


- Sirian
I thought quite a bit about what type of victory I wanted to pursue, before I even opened up the save file. The only 100K culture game I'd ever played was RBP3, and my participation there had been minimal. So, culture seemed like the clear choice, but also kind of an intimidating one, since it was unfamiliar territory. I like the fact that the scoring discouraged attacking cities, so the game would play significantly differently than most 100K-by-military victories. But, I wondered if I would be able to grab enough land to win without resorting to conquering.

My first dilemma was where to settle. The bonus grass was potentially the best tile my capitol would have, but I wanted to look around and see if I could spot anything better. I sent the worker to the bonus grass, since I figured I'd work there first. I was thinking I'd settle adjacent to the bonus grass. So, that left the choice between one SW and 1 NE of where I was. I was thinking that 1NE would be best, because it would give me the potential to use the river to its best advantage if water was scarce. The hills and mountains were nice, but a bit scary with no visible food bonus. Then, for some reason, and I'm not entirely sure why, I went SW. I wonder if I'm the only one to have settled 1 SW of the start! Of course, that spot missed the game, so I was going to need to get at least one other high-food location up to speed quickly.

I started pottery and built three warriors, nothing too exciting. I then started a granary prebuild. I sent all three of my warriors scouting, despite the barbarian warning on the main Epic page. It was just too exciting to be able to keep my capitol happy without MP down here on Monarch! Anyway, I also went ahead and popped some huts. The first hut gave me bronze working, which was nice. The second one, in 3100 BC, popped three warriors, who killed mine. Ack! I'd also seen another bar to the west of Thebes. Thebes was swapped from granary to spearman so that it wouldn't be a total loss. After the spear was built, I built a granary.

In 2900 BC, I met the Arabs. Maybe there wouldn't be enough room for me to expand! They had three cities already, were ahead of me by alphabet, warrior code, and mysticism, and had 178 gold. Boo. In 2750 BC, I met France by the western mountains. They were ahead by alphabet and warrior code, and had 4 cities. I had been working on alphabet to broker it, but apparently that wasn't going to happen. I bought the last 12 turns of it from France, and started math at minimum science. Arabia already had the wheel, and even more gold.

My scouts crossed that giant desert to the East (well, it looked giant in the ancient era!), and met the Mongols in 2550 BC. I met the Babylonians and the Romans when they wandered by my borders in 2510 BC. That's also the turn that I finished my granary, and Greece finished the Colossus. I hoped I wasn't too far in the hole already!

No. My roots were divine. I could outbuild these mortals! In 2470 BC, I met the Indians, who lacked masonry, and it was time to trade.

Masonry, 2 gpt, and 10 gold to India for Mysticism and Warrior code.
Mysticism to France for 46 gold (all of it), since they were now the only civ I knew that didn't already know it.

Now all the civs were either ahead of me by the wheel, iron working, and gold, or they were even with me, but broke.

In 2430 BC, I was able to buy the wheel from Rome for 2 gpt + 70 gold, and trade it to France for iron working. I was relieved to find that I had horses and iron relatively close by. My first settler was finished in 2270 BC, and I figured that I'd better head south for that iron while it was still available.

I met Greece in 2150 BC. They had writing, but lacked masonry, iron working, and mysticism. They also hadn't met the French, Babs, Mongols, or Indians. What I didn't realize was that the French had come so far from their homeland by the time I met them. None of the others had writing, so I didn't know that I had a monopoly on their contact. I had figured worldwide contact would happen any turn now. I did note that contact with the French and Mongols, iron, and mysticism was enough to get me writing @ second. I made the trade, and realized that the cat was now out of the bag.

So, I drew up a little chart, trying to figure out who knew who and make the best of the situation. Greece knew France, and the French knew the English. Greece also knew the Mongols, who knew everyone except for France and England. Several of the AI knew Persia, but I didn't yet. So, I might as well trade as many contacts as I could while they were worth something.

Contact with Arabs and Mongols to France for contact with the English.
England knew nobody that we don't, and lacked only writing.
Contact with the French to Babylon for contact with Persia. Persia also lacked only writing.
Writing to Rome for horseback riding.
Horseback riding to England for all their gold (215).
Writing to the Mongols, who will only pay 55 gold for it, although they have more.
France will also only offer 9 of their 103 gold for writing.
Writing and horseback riding to France for 103 gold.
I then sell contact with France and England with anybody who has cash, and net 175 gold. Most of the civs I know are now broke, and lack a tech or two from what I have. England is broke and still lacks most contacts. I have 595 gold and 3 gpt. I decide to make all the embassies I can, and spend all of it but 113. None of the civs appear to be at war at the moment.

I traded a few more contacts that I must not have noticed before, in an effort to separate civs from their money. They won't be selling stuff to one another mid-turn if they have nothing to offer!

In 2030 BC I finally founded my second city, Memphis, on the hill next to the iron. Still thinking 100K, I started a temple. I saw that cattle just past there, and realized that I'd better grab that food before Rome did. I also send my warrior-scouts back home. The other civs didn't appear to be on the mainland, and I needed to crank out the settlers. Having units for escort and protection was much more important now.

It did turn out to be a race for the cattle SE of Memphis. In 1675, Rome founded Hispalis in the area, while my settler was still on the way. In 1625, I settled Heliopolis right on the bonus grass between the wheat and the cow, three tiles away from two Roman cities, and four tiles away from a third. I planned to be fairly aggressive in the land grab phase, and wasn't too worried about fighting Rome culturally. I whipped the temple in Hispalis, and started a barracks. I figured my settling tactics wasn't going to make me any friends. Heliopolis built a worker first to get those good tiles online.

The AI had researched a bunch of techs, and I was just about to cash in on my math gambit when it was discovered by one of the AI and brokered around.

I bought code of laws for cash (miser, 3rd civ) from England.
I sold code of laws to India for math and 48 gold.
Then, code of laws to France for Philosophy.
Code of laws and 60 gold to Babylon for map making.

Whew! I started on the republic at minimum again.

In 1350 BC, the English completed the Pyramids, and shortly afterwards the Persians completed the Oracle. I sent a settler north to found Alexandria up north by the wheat and those flood plains. I whipped the barracks in Memphis, and started warriors, so I could concentrate on settlers in my granary cities. That iron still wasn't hooked up, but at least it was mine. I did finally get the road to the silks online, but in doing so I had to leave my capitol unguarded, and barbarians pillaged some shields.

I needed workers badly, and was tempted to buy a French worker when they had two available in 1250 BC. The rules didn't specify worker buys in "lesser demigod" difficulty, but I figured I should treat it as a Monarch game, so I didn't buy. I didn't have any evidence that the French had a third worker anyway. Arabia and Rome got into a war.

In 1225 BC, I whipped the temple at Heliopolis. You can pretty much assume I'm going to whip temples everywhere I can. 1100 BC was when the massive uprising happened. The barbarians weren't too intimidated by my army of cardboard cut-outs, either.

In 1000 BC, I founded Pi-Ramesses between Thebes and Alexandria. Rome had founded a city surrounded by hills and mountains east of Thebes, essentially in my first ring. Then, just about everyone declared war on Rome, and the city was razed. I figured there must be a resource there, so I sent a settler to that tile. But, two turns before I would have settled, Rome founded Byzantium one tile NE of where their last city had been. Well, this was not an established border, and now I knew there must be a resource under there. I wasn't going to give it up. Bring it on, Caesar! Have you ever messed with a Goddess before? I founded Giza two tiles away on the next turn, in 710 BC. The AI cooperated by razing Byzantium in 630 BC, and the territory was mine.

I got republic that same turn, and did some more trading. It was fun having all these civs to trade with! Only Greece and England had republic already.

Republic to India for construction, currency, literature, 31 gold, and WM.
Republic to the annoyed X-man for polytheism, WM, and 40 gold.
I saw that France, Babylon, and Persia had engineering, and Greece had that plus feudalism.
Republic to France for Engineering, WM, and 20 gold.
Republic to Babylon for 2 workers, 244 gold, and WM.
Republic to Mongols for WM and 201 gold.
Republic to Rome for wines, 3 gpt, and 76 gold. I do hope they'll live 20 turns, though I suppose I'm not trading anything per-turn, they are.
ROP with still-annoyed X-man and cautious Mongols.

Yay! I have 636 gold and 33 gpt. I lack only feudalism and Monarchy. I don't want Monarchy, and only the Greeks have Feudalism. But, I don't really have any wonder cities, and I have a lot of settling still to do. Plus, I want to be ready when the AI's run out of space and are looking for easy pickins. Hey, now I can cash-rush my temples!



Here's my illustrious civ in 630 BC. It's a good thing I got wines on that last round of trades! I had 8 cities, for a total of 428 culture. That doesn't sound like enough, but there's still a bunch of sites to grab.
Xerxes marched a bunch of immortals into my land a few turns later, which was pretty scary! I bought Feudalism from him for 110 gold and 34 gold per turn, even though I wouldn't be able to broker it, since most AI either had it or were poor.

In 470 BC I discovered that the Koreans knew me. They knew Japan, and lacked currency, republic, and construction. I bought contact with Japan and their map for construction. Japan was backwards and broke. I gave them literature for their world map. I established embassies and brokered the maps, and Japan was still annoyed. I ended up giving them polytheism. They needed to know the benefits that Deities and Demigods could bring to their lives anyway. You can kind of see from my screenshot that Greece had settled a city to my west. They settled another one over there too, which was really getting in the way of me grabbing those luxes. They were leading in culture, too. I decided that they would have to feel my wrath someday. In the mean time, I signed a ROP with them so I could get settlers past.


I settled west, and ran into the French. I had been going for the incense, and the French beat me by two turns, settling Brest 2 tiles and two turns from my chosen spot. Well, once again, they were going to have to fight me for it. I went ahead and founded Buto 2 tiles away. In 10 AD, Greece declared war on the French, and attacked Brest. It took them a while, but they razed it in 210 AD. Meanwhile, Rome's Hispalis had been razed, and I sent a settler to grab that land. In other slightly-too-close-for comfort settling, I founded Busiris 2 tiles south of Memphis to fish for those whales. Other than that, I went for dense but hopefully not ICS. I never even did make a fishing village SW of Elephantine. The goal wasn't putting more tiles to use, it was putting more temples to use. That's an unfortunate part of 100K culture, but with military discouraged, it seemed reasonable.



I figured after saying all that I should show my civ. Here's the lay of the land in 310 AD, not too much after I'd stopped building settlers and started building my empire. 18 cities, and 2302 culture. I settled a few more gaps, for example I put a city between Lisht and Edfu. I also had decided to keep my eyes open for gaps and opportunities. You can see that the AI were fighting a lot, and doing most of their fighting in my borders, which was pretty scary. I actually had a defender in every city at this point, but that was a pretty recent development. All my military had been coming from Elephantine and Memphis, where I'd built barracks. Most of my cities didn't get barracks at all until they were done with all culture.

The Romans were destroyed in 390 AD by the Persians, who had also just built Sistine. I did some trading for the standard middle ages techs, and started actual research- 30% anyway, on printing press. I didn't get it, though, the Indians beat me to it with 7 turns left. But, I was able to buy it at a discount and sell it to Greece for metallurgy. I started 30% research on democracy.

I hadn't built a forbidden palace yet, either! What kind of cultural game was I playing? Mostly, I had a hard time deciding on a perfect spot. If the Greeks hadn't had those two cities, the NW would have been a clear choice. But, it looked like I was only going to have those 3 cities up there, which hardly seemed to justify a FP. The NE was nice, but didn't have much in the way of shields. So, I built it in Memphis, which was close to my capitol but seemed really nice for those SE cities. I completed the FP in 690 AD. Oh, I'd also started a palace prebuild in Heliopolis, going for Shakespeare's for the culture. I had not yet built any wonders. The completion of the FP instantly took 16 turns off the length of that prebuild- there's instant gratification!

I became a democracy in 720 AD, and went for Free Artistry- due in 7. Also, we managed to be first to democracy. What luck to get a chance to broker both republic and democracy!

Democracy to Greece for economics, physics, military tradition, and 75 gpt.
Now, I can see theory of gravity and magnetism available from several AI.
Democracy to England for theory of gravity and 30 gpt.
Democracy to France for magnetism and 17 gold.
Persia and Greece had nationalism and steam power. France had nationalism.
128 gpt, gems, and 50 gold to Greece for steam power.
Steam Power to England for the rest of their gold and navigation.
I think I even gave democracy to the dying Arabs.

The Persians proceeded to crush the Arabs into a dying island OCC. I founded Buhen in a gap they'd left large enough to fit a flood plains city in. They really didn't have any culture in these freshly captured cities, and I didn't expect them to build any.

I got my coal hooked up, and even built the iron works in a silly size 1 mountain city (well, I started the iron works, and let it build out. The city didn't have much else to do after some cultural buildings).

The AI had been working on Smith's forever, so I didn't think I had a chance at it. I did get Shakespeare's in 810 AD, 1 turn after I'd sold free artistry to all the AI who would pay. I also was using Smith's as a ToE prebuild in Hieraconpolis, and was hoping that would work. I'd been researching electricity at 80%. Anyway, I realized that I'd started the prebuild too soon (forgot about medicine, hehe, and the AI simply weren't researching anymore), but I was able to grab Newton's there in 910 AD.

Somewhere in here, the AI really fell apart badly. My guess is that the perpetual global warfare was taking its toll. Not only did I get Newton's in Hieraconpolis, but my possible Hoover prebuild in Heliopolis was used to complete Smith's in 1010 AD. I had never, ever expected to be able to get that on. They'd had economics forever! Also, the Greeks were finally impressed our culture, when it had been the other way around for so long. The scary thing was that the Greeks cascaded to Suffrage, and they must just have researched industrialization that turn. Everybody else's cascade was ended, though.

The Arabs had gone OCC for a while, and had even captured back a mainland site. But, the Mongols wiped them out in 950 AD.

I had no idea what it would really take to win a 100K culture game. I even loaded up some RBP3 saves from a similar time period, and noticed that I was way behind where we were in that game culturally. I was very scared that I just plain wouldn't have enough culture to win it, although I supposed I could go on a modern-era military campaign easily enough. But, that wasn't what I wanted from this game. I even emailed Sirian to make sure that the UN and Space were disabled for the game. I didn't want to post it on the forum, since I fugred it was clear enough that anyone going for conquest or domination wouldn't be worried about losing to diplo or space. Sirian was amused that I'd even have to ask, btw. :P (and no, I didn't give details of the game)

The tide turned when I started running the wonders, though. I still didn't know if I had enough to win by 100K, but at least I was clearly in control of the game itself. In 1160 AD, I had 16,840 culture.

I did build ToE in Hieraconpolis in 1120 AD, and Hoover in Heliopolis in 1230 AD. I even managed to get Universal Suffrage- the old cascade from Smith's that the Greeks had been working on! I investigated Athens, their monster culture city, and found that it was size 6, with no aqueduct and 9 shields per turn. They had 25 turns to go, and I could build it in 9 from scratch.

One thing happened to put a damper on things- the Persians demanded Sanitation in 1170 AD, and I said no. They declared war, and razed Tanis. Actually, I could see why that city bothered them, because I had built it past their Cumae (3 SE), and it was blowing them away culturally. My basic plan was to get as much cash as I could, build military in the core, and cash rush culture in cities that couldn't build it on their own. So, at least I had some military by then. I decided to go for a short, defensive war. I signed ROPs ad such with other AI so that they'd like me, but didn't want to sign onto a 20 turn alliance. I built 2 war chariots, and in 1200 AD I attacked a Persian longbowman in my territory- Golden Age! This was good, because I didn't think I could trigger it with wonders, and I hadn't considered this back in the ancient era.

I attacked only Persian units, mostly in my borders, but I did go after units just over the border. I never targeted cities or food tiles, though. In 1255 AD they'd pay me 5 gpt for peace, and I took it. I then gave them some gems for free, hehe, to keep them honest. For some reason I liked that better than even peace and a 5gpt gems trade. This way, I felt like I'd won the war.

Greece still had way too much culture, but was weak otherwise. I wasn't sure I'd ever have more than half their culture. So, I bought a dogpile on them in 1355 AD, when all my deals with them had expired. This was easy to afford, as most AI would happily declare war for sanitation, and I'd had hospitals in my own civ for quite a while. I did NOT attack Greece though. I did kill plenty of their units, especially when they sent them into my lands. I did kill a few in Greek lands that were headed towards my civ. I didn't even attack those annoying northern cities they had.

I stayed at war for 20 turns, longer than most of my "allies". The French and Persians did continue to fight the Greeks, each other, both for the rest of the game, off and on. They were the powerhouse civs, but they had really lost by then. I started to get a lot of flips, too, because most of the cities along my borders had been captured and had never had so much as a temple. In fact, my empire got huge without me attacking anything. I did starve the cities like the dastardly demigod I was (they had made my mother, MY MOTHER, work as a chambermaid, those humans!).

From then on out it was mostly a matter of keeping track my culture per turn, and cash rushing culture whenever I could. I built cure for cancer, SETI, longevity, and the Internet, which was kind of fun. Mostly longevity just made my cities harder to manage. By that point I was managing them a bit haphazardly anyway. I knew the game was won if I could just find enough RL time to finish, and it was down to the wire. I didn't build the manhattan project, even for its culture, because it just didn't seem like me.

Korea, France, Persia, Mongols, and Japan are the only cities that made it to the end. The Greeks survived the dogpile, and kept their core intact but mismanaged for a long while after that, but Persia eventually swallowed them.

I reached 100,000 culture in 1788 AD, without ever attacking or besieging a city. Oh, and here's my final civ, or, what fits on the screen:



My score was 3845- RBCIv28 the Magnificent. It took me 35 hours to play, and was great fun! I look forward to reading other reports.

-Griselda
Quote
Share

Joined: October 14th, 2002, 6:20 am

June 9th, 2003, 9:17 am #5

You know the drill: Monday deadline on play, Tuesday for results.

I'm looking forward to reading these reports. I'm curious to learn just how deep of a hole was dug by giving the AI's three settlers to start. I just hope there are more than two reports (Kylearan and Gris) for me to read!


- Sirian
Well, I started playing, but the heavy hand of school and SGs intruded rather rudely, so I didn't get very far. Too bad. I was really looking forward to the game, was going to write a big story for it and everything. Next time, perhaps.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:37 am

June 9th, 2003, 10:01 am #6

You know the drill: Monday deadline on play, Tuesday for results.

I'm looking forward to reading these reports. I'm curious to learn just how deep of a hole was dug by giving the AI's three settlers to start. I just hope there are more than two reports (Kylearan and Gris) for me to read!


- Sirian
Welcome to a somewhat weird report, but I had been in a weird mood at the time I finished Epic 28. After winning the most intense Epic I ever had (the always war one), I needed to relax and a break from micromanagement, so a military victory was out of question for me. I also have read Shillen's comment on how one should not bother with a 100k victory if ICS was not allowed, which I disagree heavily with. And since I only had one 100k victory ever (actually my first won civ3 game ever, and I only found out much later why I won there in the first place...), this was the way to go for me. And I spiced it up a bit with some small variant rules as well. Here we go...

You are the daughter of the sun god, Ra. Your mother was a mortal, a kind-hearted chambermaid.

So far, so good, although there's one thing missing from all historic reports about my mother: The life of a kind-hearted chambermaid, raising the daughter of an immortal while being only mortal herself, was a very heavy burden and almost broke her. Her only way to endure this life was to seek diversion elsewhere. So when I, her daughter, had been brought to bed, and Ra was recovering from all his sun-dragging work, she quietly slipped away night upon night, seeking out parties, trying to escape the disciplined life she was forced to live at least for the night, dancing, joking and flirting. When I grew older, this went not by unnoticed by me, and so I demanded from my mother that she should bring me with her to the parties. I wanted to have fun, too, or else I would tell Ra about her secret! And she caved in, because these parties at night were all the joy that remained to her, that kept her going.

And so I grew up becoming a party-goer, a drug-user, alcohol-abuser, gogo-dancer, man-eating vamp, a pure egoist, hedonistic through and through, modelling my life after my mother's, not realizing that she lived that way only to drown her sorrows, and that her laughter was hollow and her smiles only a facade.

Your father has chosen a destiny for you: to serve as his demigoddess Pharaoh on another of his worlds.

My father, hah! What does he know about life? He's always so earnest, telling me about my responsibilities all the time, my future and how I have to work hard for it. Feh. I tried his way, once - he gave me a world to rule to educate me in the ways of war, and in the disguise of Mao I tried to make him proud, to see if his way of life might be better than that of my mother. I tried to live up to Ra's expectations. I was aggressive, I had my eyes everywhere in every city, on every of my citizens, I directed every single of my units, spent countless hours on warfare, strategy and tactics, analyzing every detail and letting all other civilizations on that world feel that I am immortal and they were only inferior fools, all doomed to die and to suffer in hell.

I succeeded, but it nearly broke me. I was a borderline experience which nearly drove me insane, and I decided to follow my mother again instead. So when Ra, pleased with my success, forced me on another, even larger world, and ordered me to subjugate another set of nations there, I decided to have fun instead. To relax. To have a vacation. To party. To smoke weed. To not bother with details. To show the other civilizations the joys of my way. To throw one big party, and to let all people of the other nations participate if they want to. And so that they don't need to travel far to attend my parties, I will celebrate multiple parties, right on the doorsteps of my neighbours, so they may join us any time they want!

My people should have fun, and long work shifts are a sure party-killer (who wants to dance through the night after a ten hour shift in a factory?). Additionally, the drugs seemed to have taken their toll on my attention span (I'm no longer able to focus my attention on one project for very long), so my people and I won't build any great wonder. No pyramids (reminds me too much of my father and his buddies), no great library (sitting in dusty rooms, silently trying to read small scribblings? How much fun is that?), no Leo's workshop (workshop, feh!), no theory of evolution (they might find out drugs are not good for evolution...) or great wall (my parties will be open for anyone!). Party-culture shall be spread by small means, not by large projects.

What about war, you ask? Oh, how unfun! This I learned on the previous world: War is all about discipline, and weed isn't allowed in the military too, so I will keep only a small military and won't declare war on anyone. Of course, if some foreign fools cause trouble at one of my parties, my bouncers will throw them out immediately, have no doubt about that!

Or will your mortal weakness lay you low before your father's uncompromising expectations?

Weakness? Hah! I may have weaknesses, but celebrating parties is not one of them, and I say "bah" to my father's "uncompromising expectations" - I'm old enough now to go my own way! So let's organize our first party, at Thebes, my new founded capital! My initial settler actually wanted to analyze the starting position, because maybe there is be a better spot for our first city - but I don't have patience for this, just found Thebes right there! The reward? 25 gold from the barbarian hut. Warriors were ordered to scout for more party and wellness locations, then a granary was constructed, followed by a temple.

In 3350BC, my northern warrior scout pops a hut, gets a conscript warrior, which in turn finds a barbarian camp and the Arabs. Lots of Arabs, I might add, considering the year. So let's have our first party!



When pottery came in, the scientists celebrated this great event and somehow "forgot" to return to work afterwards, curing their hangover, so no further research was conducted for some time. But when Rome and India were found (in 3050BC and 2950BC, respectively) and some techs have been traded, at least one scientist returned and began to study mathematics.

In 2900BC, I noticed that Arabia had at least three workers. Three! Poor souls. I liberated one for 109 gold, inviting him to party country. Contact with Babylon, Mongolia, Persia and Greece was established some time later, and another worker (this time from Babylon) was freed for alphabet and 20 gold. And in 2390BC, finally my second city, Memphis, was founded.

When France was found by me in 2270BC, and nobody else had contact with Joan, a busy turn ensued. Lots of trading netted writing, the wheel, iron working, mysticism, and lots of gold. Hey, this way of catching up (and the need in the first place!) felt like Deity! The gold was used to establish embassies with all other nations, and wow, WOW, London had some very nice lands: Four(!) wheat and a cattle tile! Wow again.

Phew, that felt nearly like working. I needed to relax then, so science was shut down and the next turns were quiet except for the founding of cities. Mathematics came in in 1475BC, but everybody knew about it already (*was* this really monarch?). But another chance for a x-for-1 deal was there, and after some more trading, I knew about codes of law, philosophy, horseback riding, map making, and the world map of the AIs.



And so it went on: Founded more cities, traded, founded more cities, traded...in 740BC, I revolted into republic, and around that time, England declared war on Rome. This was the beginning of the first world war, as the typical alliance-building and peace-then-war-then-peace-then-war declarations began. I remained neutral of course, wandering why all these madmen and -women around me fought each other instead of just having one big party! All the colourful units in my territory where funny to look at, though, because most fighting happened on my soil, as I was in the middle of all warring nations.

Around 10BC, all lands had been settled, and all what remained was to bring the party to the doorstep of my neighbours (aka aggressive settling), and building more party places in my cities, aka culture. In 210AD, feudalism was still my only middle-age tech while the AIs already began to build Copernicus'! But that's fine by me - I still had much temples, libraries and colisseums to build, and used all my money to rush things, and besides, trading is so tiresome and unfun...and great wonders I have no patience to build anyway, remember?

Here are my lands from 260AD.



Notice how my economy sucked besides me being in republic, but all this city founding and culture building had left me with little time to build marketplaces, which I now began to construct. Meanwhile, Joan was playing always war, and played it very well: Although she was now at war with everyone, she held her ground and even managed to expand a bit! I was impressed, deeply.

Oh, and by the way, to show the AIs the joys of my ways, I brought the party to them, for example:



Shortly thereafter, I began to spend some money to climb up the tech tree again, and my FP was finished in 560AD in Hieranconpolis. And three decades later, my party virus infected the first foreign city!



I abandoned and refounded it two tiles southwest. This kind of reward for my aggressive settlements came in rather sparsely, and in no way comparable with the last game where I tried this strategy excessively, Epic 13, the passive aggression epic sponsored by Arathorn. There you had to win a domination victory without ever attacking a city, and I had 23 cities flipping to me back then, but in PTW the AIs seem to know better how to lower the chances of a flip. Additionally, my culture wasn't so dominating this time: I didn't even had two times the culture of my next best rival! This probably was because of the better-than-Deity-starting units of the AIs, because of my restrictions not to build great wonders, and because I never did any starvation sieges this time.

Anyway, this was also another test of the theory that aggressive settling would piss off the AIs, which I'm still not convinced of. (They perhaps don't like it, but not by a significant amount). In Epic 13, I only had one sneak attack, but there I had a huge tech lead and more than four times the culture of everyone else. Here, I was way behind in tech, and only had a moderate cultural advantage, so what would happen here? Would the AIs be disturbed by the loud parties that were celebrated near their cities? I know from my own experience how aggressive you can become if you can't sleep because your neighbour throws a party at night, so how would the AIs react? We'll see.
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:37 am

June 9th, 2003, 10:07 am #7

But first I learned about democracy in 600AD and revolted again. In the meantime, the world war continued - I cannot remember a game with more wars, changing alliances and betraying, it was fun to behold. In 650 and 690AD, two more cities flipped to me, French this time. I also had hoped for more city razings in all the wars, but only a few actually happened, and I poached cities where I could, without settling too dense (which I don't like). When a city flipped to me which was too near to one of my existing cities, I decided to abandon it. Oh, and the second city that flipped to me also meant my first musketman, the rest of my parties were still guarded by spears and pikes while France started to have cavalry already...

In 830AD, the Arabs had enough and left the party. The focus of the war now slowly shifted from France to Rome, and my people still enjoyed all the colourful foreigners marching happily through my territory, who were surely envious of our relaxed life and our constant weed abuse. Or maybe the weed was the reason my people saw the colourful dots in the first place. But the AIs seemed to enjoy their share of weed as well: For example, there were a cavalry and a knight threatening a city guarded by a rifleman and a friendly longbow one square away. And what did the AI do? He attacked the longbow with the cavalry, and then the rifleman in the city with the knight! Ouch. Worst of all the knight managed to actually kill the rifleman! Aaah the pain, the pain...

Anyway, here's the world map from 920AD:



In that year, Giza finished the iron works, and would later be my only city getting a coal plant. Yes, that meant hard work and is the opposite of fun, and weed wasn't allowed there as well, but you need a sponsor for your parties, right? The booze, the jukeboxes and whatnot have to be produced somewhere.

Another city flipped to me near my forbidden palace, a Roman this time, which was abandoned and resettled. Slowly, peace spread again over the world, and meanwhile my people needed a break from the party and actually returned back to work in 1050AD, starting research on sanitation, in preparation for even bigger parties! After that, all scientists had to relax again from this hard work, of course. Construction of hospitals and growth of cities led to several cities rioting because there was not enough weed for eveyone - whoops. But actually checking happiness would have been work, and that's not my style this time!

Now that world peace was there, tech pace sped up. But in 1260AD, it slowed down again: Rome declared war on Greece! They started a dogpile on Greece, which didn't last long, and then Greece managed to start a dogpile on *them*, and so the boomerang Caesar had thrown would eventually lead to his destruction in 1530AD. Go figure, no more fun for him...

I aquired another city in the north, from Babylon this time, but now my people began to complain that my parties started to become repetitive and boring, and weed and booze alone won't cut it any longer! Hm. So after some thought, I had an idea:



I threw my first boat party! And notice all the Greece and English units trying to get tickets at Pi-Ramesses. They headed over to the Roman hackfest instead when they weren't able to get some...

To pacify my party people even more, I promised to reduce their workload to a minimum, and got rid of nearly every mine I could, irrigating every tile that could be irrigated, and left it that way for the rest of the game.

In 1450AD, some of the AIs looked modern, so I bought my way into the modern age as well. One last time my researchers had to be dragged away from all the fun to research computers. They hurried up to do so, and returned to their pleasures after the job was done. Now I felt safe from any tank attacks, and sure enough, on the year Rome was destroyed, this happened:



Pfff, so much to my dreams of a peaceful, relaxed game. But this would be the only aggression I had to face, and at least it was worth *something*: The oldest horse-based unit I had attacked and killed the most modern horse-based unit the Babylonian had:



...which yielded our golden age, and so the party craze in my cities increased even more! Otherwise, the war was boring: Their cavalry against my mech infantry, and in 1565AD, it was over again. One thing was strange, though: I lost exactly one unit, and only fought on my own territory, and suffered 30% war weariness!

The collapsing borders of Rome and now Greece gave ample opportunity to settle more cities, and like a kraken I expanded in their territory. Lots of size 1 cities, fully stacked with temples, libraries, colisseums, cathedrals, universities and research labs are a marvellous sight to behold!

In 1675AD, WW3 started with England declaring war on France, and soon several alliances and MPPs led to this:



At that time, I switched all animations off. Having a low-end machine and being in the middle of a world war made between turn times an exercise in patience, which I failed.

The war resulted in India's and Mongolia's destruction, while I patiently waited to reach 100k culture. In between, I noticed just how many resources I had, all aquired by peaceful expansion...



I had stopped looking for opportunities to poeach more cities now, as I would have 100k culture soon. Too much tedium! No more hassle! Some more cities had flipped to me, and in 1784AD, while the AIs started to build longevity and cure for cancer (on monarch, no less!), I had ninetyninethousandninehundredsomething culture. I was somewhat relieved that this game would be finally over, as I was tired of all the celebrations. So I hit next turn, and...
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:37 am

June 9th, 2003, 10:12 am #8

...the game continued. Argh! What happened? I didn't have twice the culture compared to the next best civ. Argh again! I guess the decision not to build great wonders haunted me now. So tired of all the parties, worn out from drugs, sex and rock'n'roll, and suffering from a hangover, I started founding cities again when the opportunity arose and rushed culture there. This actually felt like work, and I didn't want to work this game, damnit! So I at least relieved me of worker management and automated them all. I wish cities losing a tile to pollution would automatically reclaim that tile after cleanup! But since it isn't so, I just ignored this - I didn't need the cities for anything other than culture anyway.

In 1794AD, F11 showed Athens the leader of the top 5 list of cities, and a clear aspirant for a 20k victory, being at size one...hilarious. Next turn, it was Persian. Japan was destroyed on the same turn.

One more proof of the AI's stupidity: To speed things up and so that their units won't clutter up my territory, I had a RoP agreement with all other civs, and of course was fully railroaded. But Joanie apparently wanted to show off, and on several occasions landed paratroopers on my soil, who would then move on to their real target, losing one turn in the process. Weed, anyone?

Oh, and I've never seen radar artillery before, and finally was able to watch them in action as England used them. Nice animation.

And finally, in 1868AD, 82 years after I've reached 100k culture, I won. What a relief. Have a look at my final core:



It was a very fun game until I've reached 100k in 1786, but from then on it felt like a hangover after all the parties. I never attacked a city, didn't settle ICS style and never built a great wonder, all of which would have helped me in getting a much earlier victory, but overall it was very enjoyable. And I really liked to play relaxed, without micromanaging or looking at details, for a change! I don't think Ra will be pleased, but I am.

See you next Epic!

-Kylearan

P.S. One last question: Why did the increased number of starting units led to more and earlier barbarian activity?
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:37 am

June 9th, 2003, 1:09 pm #9

Report can be found here:

http://sillyputty.is-a-geek.com/civ3/rbciv28-index.html

20k one-city culture in 1926AD. Never attacked a city. As a matter of fact, only one combat ever occurred for me: a vet war chariot vs. a regular French warrior, right next to my capitol, netting me a GA. Played as an OCC. I figured, if Sirian's gonna give 'em three settlers to start, who's to compete with that? I'll show 'em...I'll play with just one city!

Seriously, this was my first OCC game ever, and my first 20k culture victory.

Highlights:
My one city was trailing the Greek capitol of Athens on culture for a good part of the game...yes I was worried.
Eight self-built wonders.
Got into an early phoney war that scored me my GA
Picked a fight with the world's #1 superpower, Rome, in the early industrial era to get a HUGE discount on a tech only Babylon had. Then used that to get a massive gpt income that was combined with alliances with everybody else, who then took Rome outta the game.
An insane amount of warring amongst the AIs from then on, I got into a fair number of wars due to denying tribute demands, getting caught stealing tech or spy-planting (I never got ONE spy planted all game...they always failed on me!)
Scored ALL THREE industrial era wonders, thanks to getting 100 shields per-turn in my city immediately after building a hospital due to having four settlers fortified and waiting to make my city jump to size 20. Used the ToE techs to earn over 25,000g!!!
Nuclear winter descended on the world in 1812 AD, when my computer proceeded to play the nuke sound effect for 45 minutes straight as the AIs flung all the nukes they had at one another, basically blasting each other back into the stone ages. I got hit with one, but rebuilt and grew back up to size quickly. Only lost my colosseum and a couple minor improvements (granary, rax, nuclear plant) to that bomb.
Hi,

congrats on your first OCC victory! The race with Athens must have been quite exciting, my Athens was a cultural powerhouse as well. And the nuclear war must have been, uh, exciting as well.

You wrote in you 775BC entry that you hoped you could get the silks back via cultural expansion, but that wasn't possible. The silks where in the first ring of the Roman city, so only another city where the silks would be in the first ring could have gotten them back.

-Kylearan
Quote
Like
Share

Joined: May 22nd, 2002, 7:37 am

June 9th, 2003, 1:17 pm #10

I thought quite a bit about what type of victory I wanted to pursue, before I even opened up the save file. The only 100K culture game I'd ever played was RBP3, and my participation there had been minimal. So, culture seemed like the clear choice, but also kind of an intimidating one, since it was unfamiliar territory. I like the fact that the scoring discouraged attacking cities, so the game would play significantly differently than most 100K-by-military victories. But, I wondered if I would be able to grab enough land to win without resorting to conquering.

My first dilemma was where to settle. The bonus grass was potentially the best tile my capitol would have, but I wanted to look around and see if I could spot anything better. I sent the worker to the bonus grass, since I figured I'd work there first. I was thinking I'd settle adjacent to the bonus grass. So, that left the choice between one SW and 1 NE of where I was. I was thinking that 1NE would be best, because it would give me the potential to use the river to its best advantage if water was scarce. The hills and mountains were nice, but a bit scary with no visible food bonus. Then, for some reason, and I'm not entirely sure why, I went SW. I wonder if I'm the only one to have settled 1 SW of the start! Of course, that spot missed the game, so I was going to need to get at least one other high-food location up to speed quickly.

I started pottery and built three warriors, nothing too exciting. I then started a granary prebuild. I sent all three of my warriors scouting, despite the barbarian warning on the main Epic page. It was just too exciting to be able to keep my capitol happy without MP down here on Monarch! Anyway, I also went ahead and popped some huts. The first hut gave me bronze working, which was nice. The second one, in 3100 BC, popped three warriors, who killed mine. Ack! I'd also seen another bar to the west of Thebes. Thebes was swapped from granary to spearman so that it wouldn't be a total loss. After the spear was built, I built a granary.

In 2900 BC, I met the Arabs. Maybe there wouldn't be enough room for me to expand! They had three cities already, were ahead of me by alphabet, warrior code, and mysticism, and had 178 gold. Boo. In 2750 BC, I met France by the western mountains. They were ahead by alphabet and warrior code, and had 4 cities. I had been working on alphabet to broker it, but apparently that wasn't going to happen. I bought the last 12 turns of it from France, and started math at minimum science. Arabia already had the wheel, and even more gold.

My scouts crossed that giant desert to the East (well, it looked giant in the ancient era!), and met the Mongols in 2550 BC. I met the Babylonians and the Romans when they wandered by my borders in 2510 BC. That's also the turn that I finished my granary, and Greece finished the Colossus. I hoped I wasn't too far in the hole already!

No. My roots were divine. I could outbuild these mortals! In 2470 BC, I met the Indians, who lacked masonry, and it was time to trade.

Masonry, 2 gpt, and 10 gold to India for Mysticism and Warrior code.
Mysticism to France for 46 gold (all of it), since they were now the only civ I knew that didn't already know it.

Now all the civs were either ahead of me by the wheel, iron working, and gold, or they were even with me, but broke.

In 2430 BC, I was able to buy the wheel from Rome for 2 gpt + 70 gold, and trade it to France for iron working. I was relieved to find that I had horses and iron relatively close by. My first settler was finished in 2270 BC, and I figured that I'd better head south for that iron while it was still available.

I met Greece in 2150 BC. They had writing, but lacked masonry, iron working, and mysticism. They also hadn't met the French, Babs, Mongols, or Indians. What I didn't realize was that the French had come so far from their homeland by the time I met them. None of the others had writing, so I didn't know that I had a monopoly on their contact. I had figured worldwide contact would happen any turn now. I did note that contact with the French and Mongols, iron, and mysticism was enough to get me writing @ second. I made the trade, and realized that the cat was now out of the bag.

So, I drew up a little chart, trying to figure out who knew who and make the best of the situation. Greece knew France, and the French knew the English. Greece also knew the Mongols, who knew everyone except for France and England. Several of the AI knew Persia, but I didn't yet. So, I might as well trade as many contacts as I could while they were worth something.

Contact with Arabs and Mongols to France for contact with the English.
England knew nobody that we don't, and lacked only writing.
Contact with the French to Babylon for contact with Persia. Persia also lacked only writing.
Writing to Rome for horseback riding.
Horseback riding to England for all their gold (215).
Writing to the Mongols, who will only pay 55 gold for it, although they have more.
France will also only offer 9 of their 103 gold for writing.
Writing and horseback riding to France for 103 gold.
I then sell contact with France and England with anybody who has cash, and net 175 gold. Most of the civs I know are now broke, and lack a tech or two from what I have. England is broke and still lacks most contacts. I have 595 gold and 3 gpt. I decide to make all the embassies I can, and spend all of it but 113. None of the civs appear to be at war at the moment.

I traded a few more contacts that I must not have noticed before, in an effort to separate civs from their money. They won't be selling stuff to one another mid-turn if they have nothing to offer!

In 2030 BC I finally founded my second city, Memphis, on the hill next to the iron. Still thinking 100K, I started a temple. I saw that cattle just past there, and realized that I'd better grab that food before Rome did. I also send my warrior-scouts back home. The other civs didn't appear to be on the mainland, and I needed to crank out the settlers. Having units for escort and protection was much more important now.

It did turn out to be a race for the cattle SE of Memphis. In 1675, Rome founded Hispalis in the area, while my settler was still on the way. In 1625, I settled Heliopolis right on the bonus grass between the wheat and the cow, three tiles away from two Roman cities, and four tiles away from a third. I planned to be fairly aggressive in the land grab phase, and wasn't too worried about fighting Rome culturally. I whipped the temple in Hispalis, and started a barracks. I figured my settling tactics wasn't going to make me any friends. Heliopolis built a worker first to get those good tiles online.

The AI had researched a bunch of techs, and I was just about to cash in on my math gambit when it was discovered by one of the AI and brokered around.

I bought code of laws for cash (miser, 3rd civ) from England.
I sold code of laws to India for math and 48 gold.
Then, code of laws to France for Philosophy.
Code of laws and 60 gold to Babylon for map making.

Whew! I started on the republic at minimum again.

In 1350 BC, the English completed the Pyramids, and shortly afterwards the Persians completed the Oracle. I sent a settler north to found Alexandria up north by the wheat and those flood plains. I whipped the barracks in Memphis, and started warriors, so I could concentrate on settlers in my granary cities. That iron still wasn't hooked up, but at least it was mine. I did finally get the road to the silks online, but in doing so I had to leave my capitol unguarded, and barbarians pillaged some shields.

I needed workers badly, and was tempted to buy a French worker when they had two available in 1250 BC. The rules didn't specify worker buys in "lesser demigod" difficulty, but I figured I should treat it as a Monarch game, so I didn't buy. I didn't have any evidence that the French had a third worker anyway. Arabia and Rome got into a war.

In 1225 BC, I whipped the temple at Heliopolis. You can pretty much assume I'm going to whip temples everywhere I can. 1100 BC was when the massive uprising happened. The barbarians weren't too intimidated by my army of cardboard cut-outs, either.

In 1000 BC, I founded Pi-Ramesses between Thebes and Alexandria. Rome had founded a city surrounded by hills and mountains east of Thebes, essentially in my first ring. Then, just about everyone declared war on Rome, and the city was razed. I figured there must be a resource there, so I sent a settler to that tile. But, two turns before I would have settled, Rome founded Byzantium one tile NE of where their last city had been. Well, this was not an established border, and now I knew there must be a resource under there. I wasn't going to give it up. Bring it on, Caesar! Have you ever messed with a Goddess before? I founded Giza two tiles away on the next turn, in 710 BC. The AI cooperated by razing Byzantium in 630 BC, and the territory was mine.

I got republic that same turn, and did some more trading. It was fun having all these civs to trade with! Only Greece and England had republic already.

Republic to India for construction, currency, literature, 31 gold, and WM.
Republic to the annoyed X-man for polytheism, WM, and 40 gold.
I saw that France, Babylon, and Persia had engineering, and Greece had that plus feudalism.
Republic to France for Engineering, WM, and 20 gold.
Republic to Babylon for 2 workers, 244 gold, and WM.
Republic to Mongols for WM and 201 gold.
Republic to Rome for wines, 3 gpt, and 76 gold. I do hope they'll live 20 turns, though I suppose I'm not trading anything per-turn, they are.
ROP with still-annoyed X-man and cautious Mongols.

Yay! I have 636 gold and 33 gpt. I lack only feudalism and Monarchy. I don't want Monarchy, and only the Greeks have Feudalism. But, I don't really have any wonder cities, and I have a lot of settling still to do. Plus, I want to be ready when the AI's run out of space and are looking for easy pickins. Hey, now I can cash-rush my temples!



Here's my illustrious civ in 630 BC. It's a good thing I got wines on that last round of trades! I had 8 cities, for a total of 428 culture. That doesn't sound like enough, but there's still a bunch of sites to grab.
Xerxes marched a bunch of immortals into my land a few turns later, which was pretty scary! I bought Feudalism from him for 110 gold and 34 gold per turn, even though I wouldn't be able to broker it, since most AI either had it or were poor.

In 470 BC I discovered that the Koreans knew me. They knew Japan, and lacked currency, republic, and construction. I bought contact with Japan and their map for construction. Japan was backwards and broke. I gave them literature for their world map. I established embassies and brokered the maps, and Japan was still annoyed. I ended up giving them polytheism. They needed to know the benefits that Deities and Demigods could bring to their lives anyway. You can kind of see from my screenshot that Greece had settled a city to my west. They settled another one over there too, which was really getting in the way of me grabbing those luxes. They were leading in culture, too. I decided that they would have to feel my wrath someday. In the mean time, I signed a ROP with them so I could get settlers past.


I settled west, and ran into the French. I had been going for the incense, and the French beat me by two turns, settling Brest 2 tiles and two turns from my chosen spot. Well, once again, they were going to have to fight me for it. I went ahead and founded Buto 2 tiles away. In 10 AD, Greece declared war on the French, and attacked Brest. It took them a while, but they razed it in 210 AD. Meanwhile, Rome's Hispalis had been razed, and I sent a settler to grab that land. In other slightly-too-close-for comfort settling, I founded Busiris 2 tiles south of Memphis to fish for those whales. Other than that, I went for dense but hopefully not ICS. I never even did make a fishing village SW of Elephantine. The goal wasn't putting more tiles to use, it was putting more temples to use. That's an unfortunate part of 100K culture, but with military discouraged, it seemed reasonable.



I figured after saying all that I should show my civ. Here's the lay of the land in 310 AD, not too much after I'd stopped building settlers and started building my empire. 18 cities, and 2302 culture. I settled a few more gaps, for example I put a city between Lisht and Edfu. I also had decided to keep my eyes open for gaps and opportunities. You can see that the AI were fighting a lot, and doing most of their fighting in my borders, which was pretty scary. I actually had a defender in every city at this point, but that was a pretty recent development. All my military had been coming from Elephantine and Memphis, where I'd built barracks. Most of my cities didn't get barracks at all until they were done with all culture.

The Romans were destroyed in 390 AD by the Persians, who had also just built Sistine. I did some trading for the standard middle ages techs, and started actual research- 30% anyway, on printing press. I didn't get it, though, the Indians beat me to it with 7 turns left. But, I was able to buy it at a discount and sell it to Greece for metallurgy. I started 30% research on democracy.

I hadn't built a forbidden palace yet, either! What kind of cultural game was I playing? Mostly, I had a hard time deciding on a perfect spot. If the Greeks hadn't had those two cities, the NW would have been a clear choice. But, it looked like I was only going to have those 3 cities up there, which hardly seemed to justify a FP. The NE was nice, but didn't have much in the way of shields. So, I built it in Memphis, which was close to my capitol but seemed really nice for those SE cities. I completed the FP in 690 AD. Oh, I'd also started a palace prebuild in Heliopolis, going for Shakespeare's for the culture. I had not yet built any wonders. The completion of the FP instantly took 16 turns off the length of that prebuild- there's instant gratification!

I became a democracy in 720 AD, and went for Free Artistry- due in 7. Also, we managed to be first to democracy. What luck to get a chance to broker both republic and democracy!

Democracy to Greece for economics, physics, military tradition, and 75 gpt.
Now, I can see theory of gravity and magnetism available from several AI.
Democracy to England for theory of gravity and 30 gpt.
Democracy to France for magnetism and 17 gold.
Persia and Greece had nationalism and steam power. France had nationalism.
128 gpt, gems, and 50 gold to Greece for steam power.
Steam Power to England for the rest of their gold and navigation.
I think I even gave democracy to the dying Arabs.

The Persians proceeded to crush the Arabs into a dying island OCC. I founded Buhen in a gap they'd left large enough to fit a flood plains city in. They really didn't have any culture in these freshly captured cities, and I didn't expect them to build any.

I got my coal hooked up, and even built the iron works in a silly size 1 mountain city (well, I started the iron works, and let it build out. The city didn't have much else to do after some cultural buildings).

The AI had been working on Smith's forever, so I didn't think I had a chance at it. I did get Shakespeare's in 810 AD, 1 turn after I'd sold free artistry to all the AI who would pay. I also was using Smith's as a ToE prebuild in Hieraconpolis, and was hoping that would work. I'd been researching electricity at 80%. Anyway, I realized that I'd started the prebuild too soon (forgot about medicine, hehe, and the AI simply weren't researching anymore), but I was able to grab Newton's there in 910 AD.

Somewhere in here, the AI really fell apart badly. My guess is that the perpetual global warfare was taking its toll. Not only did I get Newton's in Hieraconpolis, but my possible Hoover prebuild in Heliopolis was used to complete Smith's in 1010 AD. I had never, ever expected to be able to get that on. They'd had economics forever! Also, the Greeks were finally impressed our culture, when it had been the other way around for so long. The scary thing was that the Greeks cascaded to Suffrage, and they must just have researched industrialization that turn. Everybody else's cascade was ended, though.

The Arabs had gone OCC for a while, and had even captured back a mainland site. But, the Mongols wiped them out in 950 AD.

I had no idea what it would really take to win a 100K culture game. I even loaded up some RBP3 saves from a similar time period, and noticed that I was way behind where we were in that game culturally. I was very scared that I just plain wouldn't have enough culture to win it, although I supposed I could go on a modern-era military campaign easily enough. But, that wasn't what I wanted from this game. I even emailed Sirian to make sure that the UN and Space were disabled for the game. I didn't want to post it on the forum, since I fugred it was clear enough that anyone going for conquest or domination wouldn't be worried about losing to diplo or space. Sirian was amused that I'd even have to ask, btw. :P (and no, I didn't give details of the game)

The tide turned when I started running the wonders, though. I still didn't know if I had enough to win by 100K, but at least I was clearly in control of the game itself. In 1160 AD, I had 16,840 culture.

I did build ToE in Hieraconpolis in 1120 AD, and Hoover in Heliopolis in 1230 AD. I even managed to get Universal Suffrage- the old cascade from Smith's that the Greeks had been working on! I investigated Athens, their monster culture city, and found that it was size 6, with no aqueduct and 9 shields per turn. They had 25 turns to go, and I could build it in 9 from scratch.

One thing happened to put a damper on things- the Persians demanded Sanitation in 1170 AD, and I said no. They declared war, and razed Tanis. Actually, I could see why that city bothered them, because I had built it past their Cumae (3 SE), and it was blowing them away culturally. My basic plan was to get as much cash as I could, build military in the core, and cash rush culture in cities that couldn't build it on their own. So, at least I had some military by then. I decided to go for a short, defensive war. I signed ROPs ad such with other AI so that they'd like me, but didn't want to sign onto a 20 turn alliance. I built 2 war chariots, and in 1200 AD I attacked a Persian longbowman in my territory- Golden Age! This was good, because I didn't think I could trigger it with wonders, and I hadn't considered this back in the ancient era.

I attacked only Persian units, mostly in my borders, but I did go after units just over the border. I never targeted cities or food tiles, though. In 1255 AD they'd pay me 5 gpt for peace, and I took it. I then gave them some gems for free, hehe, to keep them honest. For some reason I liked that better than even peace and a 5gpt gems trade. This way, I felt like I'd won the war.

Greece still had way too much culture, but was weak otherwise. I wasn't sure I'd ever have more than half their culture. So, I bought a dogpile on them in 1355 AD, when all my deals with them had expired. This was easy to afford, as most AI would happily declare war for sanitation, and I'd had hospitals in my own civ for quite a while. I did NOT attack Greece though. I did kill plenty of their units, especially when they sent them into my lands. I did kill a few in Greek lands that were headed towards my civ. I didn't even attack those annoying northern cities they had.

I stayed at war for 20 turns, longer than most of my "allies". The French and Persians did continue to fight the Greeks, each other, both for the rest of the game, off and on. They were the powerhouse civs, but they had really lost by then. I started to get a lot of flips, too, because most of the cities along my borders had been captured and had never had so much as a temple. In fact, my empire got huge without me attacking anything. I did starve the cities like the dastardly demigod I was (they had made my mother, MY MOTHER, work as a chambermaid, those humans!).

From then on out it was mostly a matter of keeping track my culture per turn, and cash rushing culture whenever I could. I built cure for cancer, SETI, longevity, and the Internet, which was kind of fun. Mostly longevity just made my cities harder to manage. By that point I was managing them a bit haphazardly anyway. I knew the game was won if I could just find enough RL time to finish, and it was down to the wire. I didn't build the manhattan project, even for its culture, because it just didn't seem like me.

Korea, France, Persia, Mongols, and Japan are the only cities that made it to the end. The Greeks survived the dogpile, and kept their core intact but mismanaged for a long while after that, but Persia eventually swallowed them.

I reached 100,000 culture in 1788 AD, without ever attacking or besieging a city. Oh, and here's my final civ, or, what fits on the screen:



My score was 3845- RBCIv28 the Magnificent. It took me 35 hours to play, and was great fun! I look forward to reading other reports.

-Griselda
Hi,

you beat me by a good margin with your 100k victory, congratulations! Although I reached 100k one turn before you...

Good move to settle in Rome's direction initially, that way you got some more cities with resources to the east than I did in the beginning. And your AIs did a lot of razings, wow! I had waited for razed cities as well, but most cities only got captured, so poaching for me was a bit more difficult.

And you reached 100k with a lot less land than I did, it looks like you settled a bit denser. I, as you, had no real experience with the 100k approach, so I probably should have settled denser as well.

Congrats again, and I hope for more 100k victory reports to come for comparisons...

-Kylearan
Last edited by Kylearan on June 9th, 2003, 1:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Quote
Like
Share