barrel wear using copper plated bullets

barrel wear using copper plated bullets

Joined: November 2nd, 2017, 4:53 pm

November 2nd, 2017, 5:00 pm #1

Is it ok to use copper plated bullets in my ppc gun. I heard that they cause barrel throat wear. I'm new to this forum. Any help will be appreciated.
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Joined: September 8th, 2014, 8:24 am

November 3rd, 2017, 6:54 am #2

Are we talking copper plated, copper wash or just plain olde copper jacketed?

Copper plated and copper wash will wear a considerable less than copper jacketed projectiles just in the fact that you don't need to drive them as hard/fast. Do they have a benefit over plain lead or coated projectiles, at our speeds probably not

So what is your reasoning for using them instead of the "usual".
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Joined: November 2nd, 2017, 4:53 pm

November 3rd, 2017, 2:46 pm #3

Is it ok to use copper plated bullets in my ppc gun. I heard that they cause barrel throat wear. I'm new to this forum. Any help will be appreciated.
First - thanks for your response. Yes I mean copper plated/washed. I am using them for indoor shooting to keep lead contamination to a minimum. I have borderline high blood lead levels.
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Joined: September 8th, 2014, 8:24 am

November 3rd, 2017, 8:08 pm #4

No problems at all with the washed or plated projectiles. Because the wash is extremely thin compared to a jacketed projectile the amount of pressure needed to push these through a barrel is negligible so putting little excess pressure on the forcing cone, which is where the issue will lie, not in the barrel. Jacketed rifle shooters find barrel erosion in front of the chamber from the gasses needed to drive the projectile at those velocities, it isn't found 20" down the barrel. Depending on calibre this can be less than 5000 rounds, I shoot over 10000 per year with lead (every year).

If you can scratch the plating or wash off the projectile by rubbing it on a concrete floor then I would have no issues with using them. I use a hard cast projectile with a baked coating and can be as hard as your washed projectiles, up to 1000fps.

Try recovering a couple of the fired projectiles and see if there is lead showing on the lands or grooves, you may find that there is minimum lead showing so there will still be lead in the atmosphere.
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Joined: May 1st, 2016, 12:18 am

November 10th, 2017, 10:24 pm #5

if you have a lead problem, shoot a green(lead free) or lead free primer
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Joined: November 2nd, 2017, 4:53 pm

November 16th, 2017, 5:24 pm #6

No problems at all with the washed or plated projectiles. Because the wash is extremely thin compared to a jacketed projectile the amount of pressure needed to push these through a barrel is negligible so putting little excess pressure on the forcing cone, which is where the issue will lie, not in the barrel. Jacketed rifle shooters find barrel erosion in front of the chamber from the gasses needed to drive the projectile at those velocities, it isn't found 20" down the barrel. Depending on calibre this can be less than 5000 rounds, I shoot over 10000 per year with lead (every year).

If you can scratch the plating or wash off the projectile by rubbing it on a concrete floor then I would have no issues with using them. I use a hard cast projectile with a baked coating and can be as hard as your washed projectiles, up to 1000fps.

Try recovering a couple of the fired projectiles and see if there is lead showing on the lands or grooves, you may find that there is minimum lead showing so there will still be lead in the atmosphere.
Tony, thanks for your response. What you said is pretty much what I was thinking.
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