Why do man have to confess to a priest?

Why do man have to confess to a priest?

Tok turu
Tok turu

March 8th, 2006, 7:03 pm #1

Where in the Bible does it say man have to confess to a priest?
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

March 8th, 2006, 8:15 pm #2

Show us where in the Bible that it does not?
Quote
Share

Catholic Answers
Catholic Answers

March 8th, 2006, 8:22 pm #3

Where in the Bible does it say man have to confess to a priest?
Confession

Are all of our sins¡Xpast, present, and future¡Xforgiven once and for all when we become Christians? Not according to the Bible or the early Church Fathers. Scripture nowhere states that our future sins are forgiven; instead, it teaches us to pray, "And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors" (Matt. 6:12).

The means by which God forgives sins after baptism is confession: "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness" (1 John 1:9). Minor or venial sins can be confessed directly to God, but for grave or mortal sins, which crush the spiritual life out of the soul, God has instituted a different means for obtaining forgiveness¡Xthe sacrament known popularly as confession, penance, or reconciliation.

This sacrament is rooted in the mission God gave to Christ in his capacity as the Son of man on earth to go and forgive sins (cf. Matt. 9:6). Thus, the crowds who witnessed this new power "glorified God, who had given such authority to men" (Matt. 9:8; note the plural "men"). After his resurrection, Jesus passed on his mission to forgive sins to his ministers, telling them, "As the Father has sent me, even so I send you. . . . Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained" (John 20:21¡V23).

Since it is not possible to confess all of our many daily faults, we know that sacramental reconciliation is required only for grave or mortal sins¡Xbut it is required, or Christ would not have commanded it.

Over time, the forms in which the sacrament has been administered have changed. In the early Church, publicly known sins (such as apostasy) were often confessed openly in church, though private confession to a priest was always an option for privately committed sins. Still, confession was not just something done in silence to God alone, but something done "in church," as the Didache (A.D. 70) indicates.

Penances also tended to be performed before rather than after absolution, and they were much more strict than those of today (ten years¡¦ penance for abortion, for example, was common in the early Church).

But the basics of the sacrament have always been there, as the following quotations reveal. Of special significance is their recognition that confession and absolution must be received by a sinner before receiving Holy Communion, for "[w]hoever . . . eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord" (1 Cor. 11:27).
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

March 8th, 2006, 8:31 pm #4

Where in the Bible does it say man have to confess to a priest?
Is the Catholic who confesses his sins to a priest any better off than the non-Catholic who confesses directly to God?

Yes. First, he seeks forgiveness the way Christ intended. Second, by confessing to a priest, the Catholic learns a lesson in humility, which is avoided when one confesses only through private prayer. Third, the Catholic receives sacramental graces the non-Catholic doesn¡¦t get; through the sacrament of penance sins are forgiven and graces are obtained. Fourth, the Catholic is assured that his sins are forgiven; he does not have to rely on a subjective "feeling." Lastly, the Catholic can also obtain sound advice on avoiding sin in the future.

During his lifetime Christ sent out his followers to do his work. Just before he left this world, he gave the apostles special authority, commissioning them to make God¡¦s forgiveness present to all people, and the whole Christian world accepted this, until just a few centuries ago. If there is an "invention" here, it is not the sacrament of penance, but the notion that the sacramental forgiveness of sins is not to be found in the Bible or in early Christian history.
Quote
Share

Tok turu
Tok turu

March 9th, 2006, 12:41 am #5

Show us where in the Bible that it does not?
Katolik tasol i save praktisim. Ol arapela lotu i no save mekim. So barata noken tainim toktok. Soim olgeta long we long baibel em it tok olsem bai man i mas tokim sin blong em long priest. Yu yet answer now.
Quote
Share

Tok turu
Tok turu

March 9th, 2006, 12:43 am #6

Confession

Are all of our sins¡Xpast, present, and future¡Xforgiven once and for all when we become Christians? Not according to the Bible or the early Church Fathers. Scripture nowhere states that our future sins are forgiven; instead, it teaches us to pray, "And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors" (Matt. 6:12).

The means by which God forgives sins after baptism is confession: "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness" (1 John 1:9). Minor or venial sins can be confessed directly to God, but for grave or mortal sins, which crush the spiritual life out of the soul, God has instituted a different means for obtaining forgiveness¡Xthe sacrament known popularly as confession, penance, or reconciliation.

This sacrament is rooted in the mission God gave to Christ in his capacity as the Son of man on earth to go and forgive sins (cf. Matt. 9:6). Thus, the crowds who witnessed this new power "glorified God, who had given such authority to men" (Matt. 9:8; note the plural "men"). After his resurrection, Jesus passed on his mission to forgive sins to his ministers, telling them, "As the Father has sent me, even so I send you. . . . Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained" (John 20:21¡V23).

Since it is not possible to confess all of our many daily faults, we know that sacramental reconciliation is required only for grave or mortal sins¡Xbut it is required, or Christ would not have commanded it.

Over time, the forms in which the sacrament has been administered have changed. In the early Church, publicly known sins (such as apostasy) were often confessed openly in church, though private confession to a priest was always an option for privately committed sins. Still, confession was not just something done in silence to God alone, but something done "in church," as the Didache (A.D. 70) indicates.

Penances also tended to be performed before rather than after absolution, and they were much more strict than those of today (ten years¡¦ penance for abortion, for example, was common in the early Church).

But the basics of the sacrament have always been there, as the following quotations reveal. Of special significance is their recognition that confession and absolution must be received by a sinner before receiving Holy Communion, for "[w]hoever . . . eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord" (1 Cor. 11:27).
Sori turu tasol baibel in tok olsem man i mas go ling priest na tokim sin blong yu. Olgeta toktok yu kism long baibel i tok long go long priest. Sori turu tasol yu no tok klia yet.
Quote
Share

Anonymous
Anonymous

March 9th, 2006, 12:43 am #7

Confession

Are all of our sins¡Xpast, present, and future¡Xforgiven once and for all when we become Christians? Not according to the Bible or the early Church Fathers. Scripture nowhere states that our future sins are forgiven; instead, it teaches us to pray, "And forgive us our debts, as we also have forgiven our debtors" (Matt. 6:12).

The means by which God forgives sins after baptism is confession: "If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness" (1 John 1:9). Minor or venial sins can be confessed directly to God, but for grave or mortal sins, which crush the spiritual life out of the soul, God has instituted a different means for obtaining forgiveness¡Xthe sacrament known popularly as confession, penance, or reconciliation.

This sacrament is rooted in the mission God gave to Christ in his capacity as the Son of man on earth to go and forgive sins (cf. Matt. 9:6). Thus, the crowds who witnessed this new power "glorified God, who had given such authority to men" (Matt. 9:8; note the plural "men"). After his resurrection, Jesus passed on his mission to forgive sins to his ministers, telling them, "As the Father has sent me, even so I send you. . . . Receive the Holy Spirit. If you forgive the sins of any, they are forgiven; if you retain the sins of any, they are retained" (John 20:21¡V23).

Since it is not possible to confess all of our many daily faults, we know that sacramental reconciliation is required only for grave or mortal sins¡Xbut it is required, or Christ would not have commanded it.

Over time, the forms in which the sacrament has been administered have changed. In the early Church, publicly known sins (such as apostasy) were often confessed openly in church, though private confession to a priest was always an option for privately committed sins. Still, confession was not just something done in silence to God alone, but something done "in church," as the Didache (A.D. 70) indicates.

Penances also tended to be performed before rather than after absolution, and they were much more strict than those of today (ten years¡¦ penance for abortion, for example, was common in the early Church).

But the basics of the sacrament have always been there, as the following quotations reveal. Of special significance is their recognition that confession and absolution must be received by a sinner before receiving Holy Communion, for "[w]hoever . . . eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord" (1 Cor. 11:27).
your answers don't make any sense at all. By saying that minor sins are to be confessed directly to God while grave sins are to go through priests!!! what crab is this? Are you implying here that God is incapable of forgiving or cleansing us of grave sins?
THIS IS TOTAL MADNESS!! WAKE UP FROM YOUR SLUMBER MY FRIEND BEFORE YOU LOSE YOUR SALVATION.
I am without doubt now convinced that the breaking of the veil in the temple when Jesus died on the cross is not even understood by you or maybe your church for that matter.
Donot twist 1Jn1:9 my friend or you will only be fooling yourself.
Where in the bible does it say that small sins and big sins are to be divided between God and the priest?
Ol mas hangamapim wanpela RCC Patere long calvary tu ating?
Acts4:12; there is no other name under heaven that man shall call upon and be saved!! do we need to define this word any further? or see Rom10:13

All your records are from catholic historians and patere,popes etc...

Tok bokis...sapos head blo wara poison bai long bank blo wara bai i orait?
Can you so call true church catholics, seed,rocky anons etc give one simple reason why and your priests and deacons and even followers are so involve in drinking alcohol, partying and so forth?

Are this things holy according to your faith? or is there a means by which you please God and get away with these things?

There are some genuine catholics who try to live godly lives but so many are caught in worldly things so how do explain that my catholic friends?

Let this pierce your heart!! ARE YOU SAED? COULD YOU BE DEFENDING FALSE DOCTRINES THAT WERE PASSED FROM GENERATIONS TO GENERATIONS?
LUKLUK NA TINGTING GUT TRU.
Quote
Share

Tok turu
Tok turu

March 9th, 2006, 12:46 am #8

Is the Catholic who confesses his sins to a priest any better off than the non-Catholic who confesses directly to God?

Yes. First, he seeks forgiveness the way Christ intended. Second, by confessing to a priest, the Catholic learns a lesson in humility, which is avoided when one confesses only through private prayer. Third, the Catholic receives sacramental graces the non-Catholic doesn¡¦t get; through the sacrament of penance sins are forgiven and graces are obtained. Fourth, the Catholic is assured that his sins are forgiven; he does not have to rely on a subjective "feeling." Lastly, the Catholic can also obtain sound advice on avoiding sin in the future.

During his lifetime Christ sent out his followers to do his work. Just before he left this world, he gave the apostles special authority, commissioning them to make God¡¦s forgiveness present to all people, and the whole Christian world accepted this, until just a few centuries ago. If there is an "invention" here, it is not the sacrament of penance, but the notion that the sacramental forgiveness of sins is not to be found in the Bible or in early Christian history.
Sori turu tasol tok blong yu i no stret. Baibel tasol i mas leadim yumi. Olsem mi tok pinis. Baibel i nor tok olsem bai yumi mas go long priest long tokim sin blong yumi. Yesus i nor tok tu. Yumi mas go stret long em or Papa tasol.
Quote
Share

CTC
CTC

March 9th, 2006, 1:48 am #9



It is GOD who forgives sins, and once forgiven, He ceases to remember them.

Isaiah 43:25, "I, even I, am he that blotteth out thy transgressions for mine own sake, and will not remember thy sins."
It is God only who forgives sins.

Jeremiah 31:34, "...for I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more."

Ezechiel 18:22, "I will not remember all his iniquities that he has done."

Romans 3:26, "GOD in His patience remitting former sins..."

Hebrews 8:12, "Because I will be merciful to their iniquities, and their sins I will remember no more."


GOD forgave sins through a human nature.
Matthew 9:2-7, "...And Jesus, seeing their faith, said to the paralytic, "Take courage son; your sins are forgiven you...For which is easier to say, Your sins are forgiven you, or to say, Arise and walk? But that you may know that the Son of Man has power on earth to forgive sins", then He said to the paralytic, "Arise, take up your pallet and go to your house.""

GOD uses His priests as His instruments of reconciliation. The New Covenant priesthood is prefigured or 'typed' in many places in the Old Testament. Here are several examples from the Old Testament of reconciliation and atonement being performed by a priest:

Leviticus 4:20, "...Thus the priest shall make atonement for them, and they will be forgiven."

Leviticus 4:26, "Thus the priest shall make atonement for the prince's sin, and it will be forgiven."

Leviticus 4:32, "Thus the priest shall make atonement for him, and he will be forgiven."

Leviticus 4:35, "Thus the priest shall make atonement for the man's sin, and it will be forgiven."

Leviticus 5:5-6, "...then whoever is guilty in any of these cases shall confess the sin he has incurred, and as his sin offering for his sin he has committed he shall bring to the Lord a female animal from the flock, a ewe lamb or a she-goat. The priest shall then make atonement for his sin."
See also Leviticus 5:10,13,16,18, 12:8, 14:18-20,31, 15:15,30, 19:22.

Leviticus 6:7, "And the priest shall make an atonement for him before the Lord; and it shall be forgiven him for any thing of all that he has done in trespassing therein."

Leviticus 7:7, "Because the sin offering and the guilt offering are alike, both having the same ritual, the guilt offering likewise belongs to the priest who makes atonement with it."

Leviticus 16:32, "This atonement is to be made by the priest who has been anointed and ordained to the priesthood in succession to his father."

Leviticus 19:20-22, "If a man lies carnally with a woman . . . they shall not be put to death . . . but he shall bring a guilt offering for himself to the Lord, to the door of the tent of meeting, a ram for a guilt offering. And the priest shall make atonement for him . . . before the Lord for his sin which he has committed, and the sin which he has committed shall be forgiven him."

Numbers 6:11, "The priest shall offer up the one as a sin offering and the other as a holocaust, thus making atonement for him for the sin he has committed by reason of the dead person."

Numbers 15:25, "And the priest shall make an atonement for all the congregation of the children of Israel, and it shall be forgiven them..."

Numbers 15:28, "And the priest shall make atonement before the Lord for him who sinned inadvertently; when atonement has been made for him, he will be forgiven."

The prophets in the Old Testament spoke in GOD's Name, in the first person. Here are examples...

Deuteronomy 18:18-19, "I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their kinsmen, and will put My words into his mouth; he shall tell them all that I commanded him. If any man will not listen to My words which he speaks in My name, I Myself will make him answer for it."

Ezekiel 3:4, "And He said to me: Son of man, go to the house of Israel, and you shall speak My words to them."

The priest has been given the ministry of reconciliation. He mediates GOD's forgiveness to the sinner. The priest is merely an instrument of GOD. As an analogy, think of GOD as the Supreme Healer, the Master Surgeon. He will remove the cancer of sin from the soul, while using one of His priests as the scalpel.

This GOD given ministry is shown very plainly in Holy Scripture:

Matthew 16:19, when Jesus gave the power and authority to Peter, "And I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven; and whatever you shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven."

Matthew 18:18, Jesus gave this power to all of the Apostles, "Amen I say to you, whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven; and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed also in heaven."

John 20:21-23, "He therefore said to them again, 'Peace be to you! As the Father has sent Me, I also send you'. When He had said this, He breathed upon them, and said to them, 'Receive the Holy Spirit; whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained'."

Matthew 10:40, "He who receives you receives Me; and he who receives Me, receives Him who sent Me."

Luke 22:29-30, "And I appoint to you a kingdom, even as My Father has appointed to Me, so that you may eat and drink at my table in My kingdom; and you shall sit upon thrones, judging the twelve tribes of Israel."

2Corinthians 5:17-20, "Therefore, if any one is in Christ, he is a new creation; the old has passed away, behold, the new has come. All this is from God, who through Christ reconciled us to himself and gave us the ministry of reconciliation; that is, in Christ God was reconciling the world to himself, not counting their trespasses against them, and entrusting to us the message of reconciliation. So we are ambassadors for Christ, GOD making his appeal through us. We beseech you on behalf of Christ, be reconciled to God."

Clearly, the Apostles were given the authority to remit sins, or to bind them, in the person of Christ. How are they to accomplish this if they do not know what sins to remit or to bind? The sinner is required to confess his sins as shown.

1John 1:8-10, " If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just, and will forgive our sins and cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us."

The Apostles obviously would not live forever, and sin will always be with us, so they passed the authority on to others.

2Corinthians 2:10, "Whom you pardon anything, I also pardon. Indeed, what I have forgiven, if I have forgiven anything, I have done for your sakes, IN THE PERSON OF CHRIST."

The priest says in the confessional, "I absolve you of your sins." The priest is acting in Personna Christi, in the person of Christ. Since the priest is acting in the person of Christ, then it is Christ to whom you confess your sins. It is Christ alone who remits them. Jesus Christ uses the priest as His voice and His hands.

As mentioned earlier, the prophets of the Old Testament spoke in GOD's name. They spoke IN THE PERSON OF GOD. The priests of the New Covenant speak IN THE PERSON OF CHRIST.
GOD never changes.

Matthew 9:5-8, "For which is easier to say, "Your sins are forgiven you, or to say arise and walk? But that you may know that the Son of Man has power to forgive sins" - then He said to the paralytic, "Arise, take up your pallet and go to your house". And he arose, and went away to his house. But when the crowds saw it, they were struck with fear, AND GLORIFIED GOD WHO HAD GIVEN SUCH POWER TO MEN."

The New Testament lies hidden in the Old and the Old Testament is revealed in the New.

Christ, the High Priest of the New Covenant, ordained the apostles to continue His priestly mission. James 5:14-16, (14) "Is any among you sick? Let him bring in the presbyters (priests) of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord; (15)and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he be in sins, they will be forgiven him. (16) Confess, therefore, your sins to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be saved. For the unceasing prayer of a just man is of great avail."

St. James taught us that we must go to the "presbyters", and not to just anyone, to receive the "anointing", and the remission of sins. First, he told us to go to the presbyters, or priests, in verse 14. Verse 16 continues with the word "therefore", so that word is a conjunction that connects verse 16 back to verses 14 and 15. It is the priests to whom St. James told us to confess our sins.


Why do we go to confession? What is the real reason?
We go to meet Christ...
Quote
Share

seed of the Woman
seed of the Woman

March 9th, 2006, 2:17 am #10

Where in the Bible does it say man have to confess to a priest?
PENANCE--the sacrament, also known as Confession, through which Christ forgives sin and restores the soul to grace: ``Receive ye the Holy Ghost. Whose sins you shall forgive, they are forgiven them; and whose sins you shall retain, they are retained. '' (John 20:22-23. Also see Matt. 18:18).
Quote
Share