Full Text of Moti Report

Full Text of Moti Report

Tax Payer
Tax Payer

August 3rd, 2007, 1:21 am #1

Olgeta man na meri long PNG, download this Moti's report and spread this out so every Papua New Guinean can read this. Enough of this Lapun Somare hiding things for us. Shoot the bastard!

http://media.theaustralian.com.au/pdf/070802-pngr2.pdf
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true Papua New Guinean
true Papua New Guinean

August 3rd, 2007, 6:03 am #2

Yeah man I totally agree..its about time the ole fella step down and let room for inovative visionary Papua New Guineans to run the show...the people suffer enough..we need people like Mekere and Bart Philemon they are true people serving politians.. with the people on their minds.
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Yu Guess?
Yu Guess?

August 3rd, 2007, 6:11 am #3

Olgeta man na meri long PNG, download this Moti's report and spread this out so every Papua New Guinean can read this. Enough of this Lapun Somare hiding things for us. Shoot the bastard!

http://media.theaustralian.com.au/pdf/070802-pngr2.pdf
Tax payer,

Thanks for the posting the links. Has a concerned Papua New Guineam, however, I think this is further evidence that Australia is working to influence the formation of the PNG Government. I read that there is a court order in place not to publish findings of the enquiry and that this publication is a breach of that court order by that newspaper and that charges may be laid. However, I am sure the newspaper executives have consulted with their Government before making public the full copy of this report. I won't be surprise if these newspaper is not charged (charges blocked) for contempt of court in Australia.

The PNG Government let Julian Moti go! The Australian government will let this newspaper go free too!

Bai yumi bekim bekim na stap!

Yu Guess?

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Scape Nazi
Scape Nazi

August 3rd, 2007, 6:19 am #4

i don't think a ruling made in PNG courts is worth a damn anywhere else... if the findings aren't to be made public, that doesn't mean anything in oz. the australian paper can't be taken to court over it (i don't think so), the person who leaked it from here though might get his ass lubricated...
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Anonymous
Anonymous

August 3rd, 2007, 7:37 am #5

The court order is only effective in PNG. NOT Australia.

This a another example of Australia trying to influence the formation of PNG government. Australia needs a pro-aussie person, Not Somare.

However, the findings of the enquiry should be made public. Just all other enquiries funded by tax payers money.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

August 3rd, 2007, 8:59 am #6

What is everyone so concerned about the law now. PNG laws are broken all the time. The whole Moti saga was about breaking the law. No one enforces the law, the courts don't operate effectively. Whats your problem with a leaked taxpayer funded Inquiry? Unfortunately this has become the land of broken laws!

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Anonymous
Anonymous

August 3rd, 2007, 9:44 am #7

The court order is only effective in PNG. NOT Australia.

This a another example of Australia trying to influence the formation of PNG government. Australia needs a pro-aussie person, Not Somare.

However, the findings of the enquiry should be made public. Just all other enquiries funded by tax payers money.
Whoever leaked the Moti report to Australia engaged in civil disobedience, which is a purposeful breaking of unjust laws. All you whingers who are worried about what laws are broken will never contribute much to changing the injustice we have in our country. Those who strategically break laws to cause trouble for unethical or corrupt leaders should be applauded and given our full support.

Whoever leaked the Moti report and broke PNG law: God bless.
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Kapsait
Kapsait

August 3rd, 2007, 7:52 pm #8

Olgeta man na meri long PNG, download this Moti's report and spread this out so every Papua New Guinean can read this. Enough of this Lapun Somare hiding things for us. Shoot the bastard!

http://media.theaustralian.com.au/pdf/070802-pngr2.pdf
Scrambling for cover



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A leaked report shows the PNG Prime Minister allowed an alleged pedophile to escape to the Solomons and become Attorney-General, writes Michael McKenna
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A professional military man, Ur had been bewildered but unquestioning when Commodore Peter Ilau had suddenly and without explanation jetted off on the morning of October 9 last year to Solomon Islands.

Ur, like the rest of PNG, had been closely watching the explosive events surrounding the September 29 arrest of Julian Moti, a Fijian-born, Sydney-trained lawyer and hunted alleged pedophile.

Moti had been arrested at the request of Australia while in transit at Port Moresby's Jackson's international airport. He had been en route from India to Honiara to became the Solomons' new attorney-general, a position bestowed by his friend and former client, Prime Minister Manasseh Sogavare.

Moti is wanted by Australian Federal Police over the alleged rape of a 13-year-old girl in Vanuatu almost a decade ago. But Moti evaded extradition to Australia by skipping bail and was hiding out in the Solomons high commission in Port Moresby.

Ur had no reason to believe the firestorm blowing up between his Government and Canberra would hit the military's radar. The ambitious officer and defence chief of staff expected to enjoy the top job. He was wrong.

At 11am, as Ur was trawling through mundane administrative duties left by Ilau, he was ordered to the office of one of PNG's highest-ranking and respected bureaucrats, Joseph Assaigo, director-general of the Office of National Security Co-ordination and Assessment. Assaigo, a career public servant and one-time high commissioner to the Solomons, got straight to the point. "I wasn't able to discuss with you on Sunday because you left after the meeting but the issue is I got a direction to get rid of the copra bag," Assaigo told Ur from behind his desk.

Ur was confused. Copra is the kernel or meat of a coconut but he didn't know what the copra reference meant. Assaigo set him straight: they had to get rid of Moti and the order had come from the Government, led by Michael Somare.

"I asked if Chief Secretary (Joshua Kalinoe) and the old man (Somare) are aware of this and Mr Assaigo said yes," Ur later told an internal defence investigation. Ur knew the clandestine operation - codenamed Eagle 502 - was fraught with danger.

Under oath at a subsequent defence board of inquiry hearing into the operation Ur said he had no reason to doubt Assaigo or confirm the order with Somare or the Defence Secretary, as required by PNG's Defence Act.

"He (Assaigo) is a credible officer in the position and we respect the position; if he says that high authorities have given me those directions, I carry them out," Ur told the inquiry which was later closed down by Somare. Somare, 71, has suppressed the inquiry's report since March.

The arrest of Moti - a contentious but backroom adviser to several Pacific nations - had gripped PNG and the Pacific region.

There was a media blitz. Australia was disgusted Moti had been granted bail and was in the sanctuary of the Solomons high commission. Somare had been on radio on October 4, publicly challenging Australia's extradition request and declaring Moti was "entitled to free passage" to Honiara. "Let Moti go," Somare said.

Earlier that day, Somare had secretly received a five-page diplomatic note from Sogavare calling on "Melanesian solidarity" to give Moti "safe passage" to the Solomons and to order the PNG prosecutor to withdraw the court proceedings.

"The Solomon Islands Government now seeks to secure your understanding and co-operation in our effort to resolve the existing impasse," Sogavare said.

Ur's acceptance of the order to smuggle Moti out of PNG was rooted in self-preservation as much as his belief he was carrying out Somare's wishes. "If I disobey, then it means I have been disloyal to the Government," he told the inquiry. "I can be liable ... it is a mutinous act."

After the morning meeting with Assaigo, Ur went back to barracks and began planning the operation. What happened next had tumultuous consequences for himself, his subordinates and further soured already bad Australian relations with PNG and the Solomons. At the defence force hearing, Ur said he immediately called in his top military strategists: Colonel Vagi Oala, commander of PNG's Joint Operations Centre, and Lieutenant Colonel Ron Hosea, director of air operations, and asked them of the "status of (available) aircraft".

Hosea told Ur he had a PNG military plane - later revealed at the hearing not to be air-worthy after being grounded in 2002. It didn't matter. The top brass forged ahead with the plan, secretly briefing the air crew and ignoring requirements to submit a flight plan to PNG or Solomons' aviation authorities.

"The entire flight was undertaken without any lights and communication and to avoid

detection by Australian radar, hence the CASA was flown at a height of 17,000 feet," the defence report said.

Before take-off, at about midnight on October 9, Assaigo was called by an unidentified person confirming Moti had been squirrelled out of the Solomons high commission on the back seat of a white sedan.

The caller needed Assaigo to get Moti past security at the defence force hangar.

Assaigo told the inquiry he drove to a road junction, near the airport where he picked up Moti "and others" and took them to the hangar. At about 12.30am or 12.45am on October 10, the flight took off carrying nine passengers, including Moti and two Solomon Islanders; a government lawyer named Christopher Hapa and Sogavare's nephew and top adviser, Robson Djokovic.

The flight landed at 5am on the small island of Munda, in the western provinces of the Solomons. Moti was arrested by local police, under the direction of the then Solomons' police commissioner, Australian Shane Castles, after PNG troops, posted there to protect the border to nearby Bougainville, inexplicably ignored the unscheduled arrival.

Moti and his travelling companions were charged with alleged passport and immigrations offences.

Sogavare, then facing an Opposition-led no-confidence motion, privately vowed to Castles he would support a thorough investigation. It was an empty promise. After winning the no-confidence vote, the charges against Moti and the two high-level henchman were dropped when Solomons' Immigration Minister Peter Shanel issued Moti with an exemption order.

Several weeks later, Castles was sacked after he was deemed an "undesirable immigrant" while he was on Christmas holidays.

Last month, Moti, 42, was sworn in as Attorney-General despite howls of protest from Australia, New Zealand and Opposition MPs and church groups in the Solomons.

But the apparent whitewash has not been so easy to cover up in PNG.

Despite Somare's denials he had ordered Moti's escape, his defence minister Martin Aini late last year asked PNG Supreme Court judge Gibbs Salika to get to the bottom of the scandal. The two-month inquiry finished its hearings in February, days after Aini was sacked by Somare, who refused to attend the hearings and issued his denials to the inquiry in writing.

A subsequent report, suppressed by Somare but leaked to The Australian, recommends the PM, as well as his top advisers and military men - including Assaigo and Ur - face investigation and charges for a range of offences.

In his report, Salika ruled the evidence against Somare - who he has accused of lying to the inquiry - was clear despite the absence of a written order from the Prime Minister to get rid of Moti.

"There is no evidence of the Prime Minister's directions uttered to Mr Assaigo," Salika said. "However there is abundant circumstantial evidence that the direction to get rid of Moti came from the Prime Minister Sir Michael Somare.

"That direction was conveyed to Mr Assaigo who facilitated the escape. He is the man who did the dirty job. He knew the job was dirty ... that is why he asked and was given assurance of protection. But as it turned out he was never protected and he has to fend for himself now."

Assaigo's evidence is crucial to the findings. According to Assaigo's testimony, on October 8 he was "instructed" by ambassador Barnabas Rongap - Somare's social projects officer - "that the Prime Minister had directed the Chief Secretary and I to get rid of Julian Moti".

Assaigo, a lawyer who believed Moti should be dealt with in court, initially did nothing. He was made to answer for his inaction the next day, when he was called to the office of Somare's chief-of-staff Leonard Louma.

Louma, who had been Somare's right-hand man for three years, got straight to the point. "Mr Louma said that the Prime Minister was very disappointed in the Chief Secretary and I in failing to facilitate his directions to remove Mr Moti out of PNG jurisdiction," Assaigo told the hearing.

Assaigo said he then asked Louma to talk with Somare about the matter. Less than an hour later, Assaigo said Louma called. "Mr Louma rang me to advise that the Prime Minister had given further directions to remove Moti out of PNG and that Mr Louma was now conveying the direction to me."

Assaigo said he then went to Louma's office and was told to direct the "eye in the sky (police helicopter) or PNGDF Air Squadron unit to remove Moti out of the jurisdiction of PNG".

Assaigo went and saw Kalinoe and discussed the operation before setting it in train.

Salika said both Louma and Kalinoe lied about the events and Louma's claim Assaigo acted alone was laughable. During cross-examination, Louma denied ever having met Assaigo over the matter and claimed he heard about the covert flight through the media the next day.

"I don't recall receiving such directions or I don't recall giving directions to Mr Assaigo to get rid of Mr Moti," Louma said.

But Salika said Louma and Somare, who has claimed Assaigo acted alone, could not be believed.

"The Prime Minister has not denied issuing a general direction to 'get rid of Moti', or 'let Moti go'," Salkia said. "Furthermore, we find that Mr Assaigo could not have acted alone, as Louma, Kalinoe, Rongap, Kasa and the Prime Minister would have liked us to believe".

Michael McKenna is a senior writer at The Australian.

Source: the Australian Copyright 2007 News Limited - July 30, 2007
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Musmus
Musmus

August 3rd, 2007, 9:11 pm #9

Julian Moti, the Fijian-born, Indian-orgin, Australian-citizen, Vanuatu-pedophiler, PNG-messed up, & Solomon Island Attorney is a real Pacificwood Star!

Somebody write a book or a movie for this choild molester. But don't forget to include Bertha Somare in your script.

Musmus
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Arthur
Arthur

August 8th, 2007, 6:44 am #10

Bertha should marry Moti. That why Somare can be his tambu. Then they can live happily ever after behind bars...
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