"Actions" anyone can do to attack corruption/RH exploitation of PNG

"Actions" anyone can do to attack corruption/RH exploitation of PNG

Waigani Swamp Hens
Waigani Swamp Hens

June 13th, 2006, 11:50 am #1

Here's a few ideas of what committed PNGeans are already doing whenever they can make time. Don't wait until some group forms, start doing things on your own and as your friends find out, those who share your beliefs will probably give you a hand.

*************** Contribute to PNGSCAPE discussions on RH and corruption in our leadership. It takes an effort, and sometimes a risk just to post some kinds of information. Get involved! If you don't believe the information, challenge it! If you have additional information or corrections to offer, add them! If nothing else, just give a pat on the back to those who are already making the effort on your behalf (you're learning new info from their efforts).

**************** Letters to the newspapers on issues of interest to you. This is the most efficient use of your time because if published, your letter can reach tens of thousands. Don't expect letters critical of RH or exploitative logging to be published in The National. Send to the PC instead. Keep your letters short, they're more likely to be published that way. Pen names are acceptable and letters can be e-mailed.

**************** Help search the internet for more information on RH, other foreign companies that are exploiting PNG, and information on other issues that are most seriously affecting PNG. Help educate others by taking the time to research and find new information, then post it on PNGSCAPE. You don't have to start out as an expert. It doesn't take as much time as you might expect to know more about a topic than any of the rest of us!

Challenge, always challenge, if you want to be a leader for true change, rather than just a do gooder who dedicates a lot of time for good causes, but doesn't actually bring about any kind of change. Challenge what people say, offer evidence to the contrary. The least productive contribution you can make to PNGSCAPE serving as an educational site for corruption and ongoing exploitation of our people is to demand censorship. Those who feel wronged have every opportunity on PNGSCAPE to correct the record and argue their perspectives.

PNGSCAPE becomes an interesting or a boring site, an educational or an idle entertainment place, all dependent upon what people like you decide to post.

All the above are actions, and a lot of them take very little time actually. The worst thing you can do is to not even do the above hoping that someone else will do it for you.

Future blo PNG stap long han blo yumi, mipela tok tru o mipela tok giaman?
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cup a soup
cup a soup

June 13th, 2006, 6:11 pm #2


Yeah... wat u say... jump on a band wagon, jump up and down as much as you can.... especially on Pngscape - what risk when you can hide behind what eva name u want.

You talk about risks; realise that people in power are also human with loved ones; stick and stones no ... but words hurt.

Way blo PNG - harim tok tok first nah ting ting afta; Quick to judge... yes .... little bit closed minded... maybe also tall poppy syndrome.

I agree fight corruption, challange, share information but at least have proof of what you say or quote a source with a good name. Right a letter to Post Courier and put your name on it.

The internet is obviously a true source of information - where ppl. can post what eva they want - without proof or name.

I dont see any pats on back from u only people u want to fight.

U talk about real change - u sound like a sheep to me; just trying to create drama so this is not a boring site!






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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 15th, 2006, 1:08 am #3

You say: Have proof of what you say or quote a source with a good name. Right a letter to Post Courier and put your name on it.



Observation: Not even the Ombudsman can meet your standards on many issues that are clearly wrong. No posting on Pngscape that has kick has a real name. No letter to the newspapers that has kick has a real name.

Oseah Philemon told me a couple years back that in fact this is generally true. The best letters, the most revealing ones, will never have a clear connection to who is giving the information. 99% of letters that have a real name signed have very little kick to them. Most have the objective of making the writer look like a bigshot and achieve nothing more than that.

Give the Editor in chief of the Post Courier some credit for his experience, okay? More than a lot of people Oseah sees what is needed to create the kind of movement that will change a society. But his hands are tied by who he works for.

Think of PNG as being in the wild west days. People got hanged without a trial. Some innocent people were wrongly accused but the whole process settled down the wild west.

PNG isn't yet at that stage of the process you're talking about. Look at the big picture. Study the process. Fit in where you can.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 15th, 2006, 1:25 am #4

Here's a few ideas of what committed PNGeans are already doing whenever they can make time. Don't wait until some group forms, start doing things on your own and as your friends find out, those who share your beliefs will probably give you a hand.

*************** Contribute to PNGSCAPE discussions on RH and corruption in our leadership. It takes an effort, and sometimes a risk just to post some kinds of information. Get involved! If you don't believe the information, challenge it! If you have additional information or corrections to offer, add them! If nothing else, just give a pat on the back to those who are already making the effort on your behalf (you're learning new info from their efforts).

**************** Letters to the newspapers on issues of interest to you. This is the most efficient use of your time because if published, your letter can reach tens of thousands. Don't expect letters critical of RH or exploitative logging to be published in The National. Send to the PC instead. Keep your letters short, they're more likely to be published that way. Pen names are acceptable and letters can be e-mailed.

**************** Help search the internet for more information on RH, other foreign companies that are exploiting PNG, and information on other issues that are most seriously affecting PNG. Help educate others by taking the time to research and find new information, then post it on PNGSCAPE. You don't have to start out as an expert. It doesn't take as much time as you might expect to know more about a topic than any of the rest of us!

Challenge, always challenge, if you want to be a leader for true change, rather than just a do gooder who dedicates a lot of time for good causes, but doesn't actually bring about any kind of change. Challenge what people say, offer evidence to the contrary. The least productive contribution you can make to PNGSCAPE serving as an educational site for corruption and ongoing exploitation of our people is to demand censorship. Those who feel wronged have every opportunity on PNGSCAPE to correct the record and argue their perspectives.

PNGSCAPE becomes an interesting or a boring site, an educational or an idle entertainment place, all dependent upon what people like you decide to post.

All the above are actions, and a lot of them take very little time actually. The worst thing you can do is to not even do the above hoping that someone else will do it for you.

Future blo PNG stap long han blo yumi, mipela tok tru o mipela tok giaman?
Ridim pastaim.

Skelim.

Larim i stap wanpela, tupela de.

Ridim na skelim gen.




Sapos yu wanpela man o meri bilong wokim eksen


Bihainim wanem samting yu laik bihainim.

Larim ol arapela samting i stap. Bihain sampela arapela man o meri bai bihainim.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 15th, 2006, 8:49 am #5

"The world is not dangerous because of those who do harm but because of those who look at it without doing anything"

This statement was by the famous scientist Albert Einstein FYI
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Anonymous
Anonymous

June 15th, 2006, 9:31 am #6

A Papua New Guinean woman, of all people, shows more guts in taking on corruption in forestry than 1000 PNG men. Annie Kajir had thie interview after she won a world famous environmental price because of her GUTS. Annie Kajir didn't even need a list of suggestions on how to fight corrupt interests in PNG. she simply did it!!!!



Anne of Green Able
Anne Kajir combats the greed of Papua New Guinea's timber barons

By Michelle Nijhuis
26 Apr 2006


The highlands of Papua New Guinea cradle some of the most remote places in the world, and are home to an astounding diversity of languages, cultures, and plant and animal life -- including the Asian Pacific's largest intact stand of tropical forest.

The government of Papua New Guinea has a cozy relationship with the timber industry, particularly with Malaysian logging companies, and illegal logging is rampant. Though traditional communities are guaranteed land rights under the national constitution, these rights are often ignored, and forest landowners report extreme intimidation and abuse at the hands of timber companies.

Attorney Anne Kajir has spent most of her adult life fighting for traditional landowners. The CEO of the Environmental Law Center in the capital city of Port Moresby, Kajir has used court cases and legal education work to force the logging industry to pay damages to some indigenous landowners. Though she has been physically attacked and robbed in retaliation, she has persisted with her campaign, and is currently the lead attorney in a Supreme Court case against a multinational timber conglomerate.

Despite victories by Kajir and her allies, the power of the timber industry is growing. Last year, a new national forestry bill stripped away landowner-consent requirements for timber permits. It also removed a seat for environmental interests on Papua New Guinea's National Forest Board, replacing it with a seat for the timber industry. "We've gone back to square one," says Kajir.

Kajir, 32, was awarded one of six 2006 Goldman Environmental Prizes at a ceremony in San Francisco on April 24. She spoke to Grist from San Francisco.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------



INTERVIEWER: Tell me how illegal logging is affecting the forests and people of Papua New Guinea.


ANNIE KAJIR: Illegal logging is happening all over the country, and unfortunately, 40 percent of the forest in Papua New Guinea is already gone. That's frightening enough, but it's going from bad to worse. Basically the companies that are logging in Papua New Guinea do not comply with the laws that we have in place, and they disrespect the landowners. The government is clearly supporting logging, and every single day there are permits being granted illegally, and new projects starting. There's simply no control over logging.

Landowners are usually the ones most affected, simply because most of their land is destroyed. They have to walk longer distances to fetch clean water, and women have to go deeper into the forest to look for food. In many of these areas, there is no proper infrastructure being built -- no proper school, no proper hospital.


INTERVIEWER: How did you begin defending the rights of local landowners?

ANNIE KAJIR: I became involved as a volunteer for a public-interest environmental law organization, and I used to visit a lot of the remote communities and conduct legal awareness trainings. One time, a woman approached me and asked if I could help her. She could not speak English, or pidgin, but she asked me through a translator if I would follow her. So I followed her, and she showed me a piece of land that had red ribbons tied around it in a square. She said, "You see this place? This is my sacred land. This is where I believe my ancestors came from." It was like the aftermath of a volcano. Things were buried underground, trees were buried under soil, everything was mud and -- yuck. It had been completely devastated. They are supposed to be doing selective logging, but it's just mass destruction.

So this woman said to me, "You stop the logging. I don't want this to happen in any other place, on any other part of my land." I said, "You know, I cannot promise you that I'll stop the logging, but I'll try." And that's where I've been ever since.


INTERVIEWER: What do you consider your most effective strategies?

ANNIE KAJIR: You have to educate the people, to get them to know their rights and act upon them. In Papua New Guinea, we've lost the battle already -- you can't go to a government department and argue your case, because you don't get anywhere. The only way we can get anything done is to push through the court system.


INTERVIEWER: What can people in industrialized countries who care about this issue do to help your cause?

ANNIE KAJIR: The consumers need to watch what they're buying. If they're buying timber products, they need to make sure the timber isn't illegal -- they need to make sure it's not coming from places like Papua New Guinea, where most of it is illegal.


INTERVIEWER: Do you see signs of hope?

ANNIE KAJIR: The landowners are not as illiterate as they were before. More people are being educated about what is right, and a lot of people are now speaking up. So many landowners are going to court out of frustration, because they have no other means of settling their issues.



INTERVIEWER: What do you consider your greatest victories?

ANNIE KAJIR: Well, obviously, the Goldman is one of them. I used to think that it was only a small world that I was working in, but to receive this award is quite significant -- now the whole world knows about our efforts. I hope the Papua New Guinea government can see this as a sign that we need to get things right with the environment back home.


INTERVIEWER: How do you plan to use the money?


ANNIE KAJIR: I'd like to support the work that we do. And of course [laughs], I'd like to buy a house, and go sailing.



INTERVIEWER: What gives you the energy, and the strength, to keep going?

ANNIE KAJIR: Seeing people satisfied at the end of the day, I suppose. Seeing the light in the landowners' eyes when they say, "Oh, we didn't know that we had [these rights], and now we know." They know they've got somebody to help them, and you know you're there because they've asked you. It's a special relationship that you have with these people.

I just like seeing people happy, you know? So it basically gives me the kicks every time the landowners smile and say, "Thank you."





- - - - - - - - - -

Michelle Nijhuis is a freelance writer in Paonia, Colo., and the winner of the 2006 Walter Sullivan Award for Excellence in Science Journalism.




FROM THE WEBSITE: www.grist.org/news/maindish/2006/04/26/nijhuis-kajir/
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June 19th, 2006, 3:12 am #7

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Anonymous
Anonymous

September 15th, 2007, 7:08 am #8

You say: Have proof of what you say or quote a source with a good name. Right a letter to Post Courier and put your name on it.



Observation: Not even the Ombudsman can meet your standards on many issues that are clearly wrong. No posting on Pngscape that has kick has a real name. No letter to the newspapers that has kick has a real name.

Oseah Philemon told me a couple years back that in fact this is generally true. The best letters, the most revealing ones, will never have a clear connection to who is giving the information. 99% of letters that have a real name signed have very little kick to them. Most have the objective of making the writer look like a bigshot and achieve nothing more than that.

Give the Editor in chief of the Post Courier some credit for his experience, okay? More than a lot of people Oseah sees what is needed to create the kind of movement that will change a society. But his hands are tied by who he works for.

Think of PNG as being in the wild west days. People got hanged without a trial. Some innocent people were wrongly accused but the whole process settled down the wild west.

PNG isn't yet at that stage of the process you're talking about. Look at the big picture. Study the process. Fit in where you can.
Well here's some action people. I wonder where they vanished to because I've never seen their letters in the papers.
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