Yvonne i read a couple of chapters of What Our Mothers Didn't Tell Us

Yvonne i read a couple of chapters of What Our Mothers Didn't Tell Us

anon
anon

July 24th, 2011, 7:04 pm #1

omgsh!!!! that was profound. i will be getting that book.

even though it was written 1999, i would have been the age demographic she was writing about. it really woke me up to how much their cultural values have shaped my life choices. quite frankly i feel like my generation was a terrible lab experiment and it makes me pretty angry.

seriously, thank you for turning me onto it.

for anyone else to wants to read a couple of chapters...

http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/c/cr ... thers.html
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K
K

July 25th, 2011, 12:53 am #2

I clicked on that site in your link and it requires you to create a log in, to register to read anything. Will it then take you directly to the page of that book?
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anon
anon

July 25th, 2011, 9:02 pm #3

it did the same thing to me. weird. when i googled it and clicked on the site i was able to read the first two chapters and then if i wanted to read further, it required a login.

i think NYT are now charging for membership. if you google the title you may be able to find it the way i did.

try google, it might work.
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Yvonne
Yvonne

July 26th, 2011, 1:10 am #4

omgsh!!!! that was profound. i will be getting that book.

even though it was written 1999, i would have been the age demographic she was writing about. it really woke me up to how much their cultural values have shaped my life choices. quite frankly i feel like my generation was a terrible lab experiment and it makes me pretty angry.

seriously, thank you for turning me onto it.

for anyone else to wants to read a couple of chapters...

http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/c/cr ... thers.html
Yes - it really does offer some food for thought - doesn't it?

Her views aren't exactly politically correct - but I have to admit that I really identified with what she wrote - just as you have.

Glad you are enjoying it. She later wrote a novel based on the same theory...woman putting her career aside and being devalued by peers..Can't remember the title, but will look it up.

Take care,
Yve
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Yvonne
Yvonne

July 26th, 2011, 2:13 am #5

The novel that she wrote is called "Amanda Bright @ Home".

This was a fun, yet thought provoking read also.
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anon
anon

July 26th, 2011, 3:42 pm #6

i will check it. :o]
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Anon
Anon

July 27th, 2011, 11:28 pm #7

omgsh!!!! that was profound. i will be getting that book.

even though it was written 1999, i would have been the age demographic she was writing about. it really woke me up to how much their cultural values have shaped my life choices. quite frankly i feel like my generation was a terrible lab experiment and it makes me pretty angry.

seriously, thank you for turning me onto it.

for anyone else to wants to read a couple of chapters...

http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/c/cr ... thers.html
I wonder if it also addresses the anti-commitment attitudes of men these days.

My getting married late was more a byproduct of meeting mostly men who had no interest in marriage or kids - ever. Many of those men I dated are still living life today as confirmed bachelors. I wish there were also a book that would address the lifestyle choices of men these days.

In my mother's generation, lots of men were interested in marriage. In my generation, that number dwindled.
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anon too
anon too

July 28th, 2011, 3:58 pm #8

i believe there are several factors which the book does touch on-like i said i have only read the 1st two chapters...

1. when women don't seriously look for mates in their 20's; the men who are interested in commitment marry those who are, 20 somethings have more of a selection from which to choose. when women (at least it was in my generation) are looking to commit in their thirties, they don't attract those same men or they attract men who are older and have more emotional baggage. of course this is a generalization

2. sex is easy to come by now with 'respectable' women, therefore men are not forced to commit for it. the social contract that we used to have is no longer there.

3. have you seen american commercials lately? men are constantly being bombarded with the message that we don't respect them and think they are dolts; we don't need them, the sistahs are doing it for themselves.

i got lucky, a commitment-phobe married me when i was 38 and it was my second marriage but i have many girlfriends who never married.
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Anon
Anon

July 28th, 2011, 10:01 pm #9

I have many girlfriends in their 40s, 50s and older who have never married, even though they wanted to.
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