Dee, there are other ways around menopause

Dee, there are other ways around menopause

Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 3rd, 2011, 8:08 pm #1

The multi-billionaire's fertility treatment story is in court documents because her estate was engaged in an ownership battle after her death.

This is a short excerpt - her sister is an obgyn doctor herself
http://www.rthk.org.hk/rthk/news/englis ... 587497.htm

I have been following lots of advanced age DE cases (60+), and I came across a few articles that followed their ongoing issues, I will try to get the links when I have time.

As I said before, you can do whatever you want to your pre-menopausal body, but once the physiological deadline is here, you'd better pay some respect. I am not saying an advanced age woman should not become a mother, she can use a surrogate to achieve the same goal, and preserve her own health in the meantime, for her own sake and for the baby.

In fact, if one is doing DE, the cost of surrogacy can be so much lower because you don't have the constraints of OE. Most of us are in high cost-of-living areas so if we do OE + surrogacy, the cost can be easily 2x of lower cost-of-living areas. For example, in California, it is very hard to find a surrogate that comes with medical insurance that will cover surrogacy, and there is only ONE surrogacy insurance you can buy, and the total cost is around $35K (because it has many exclusions, but you are buying to cover the catastrophic situations). If I were doing DE + surrogacy, I'd do it in Idaho, Iowa, and whole bunch of places without even going international where the cost is easily less than half of what I need to pay in California. And our surrogates charge easily $30-40K upwards to cover their cost of living as opposed to $10-15K in Iowa. Our agencies typically cost $18-20K, while agencies in Idaho charge $5K. Our cycle fee, C-section fee, whatever fees you can think of are simply 2-3x more than a lot of the states in between two coasts. But again, if you are going DE, you don't need to tie yourself to a surrogate along the coasts.

So if someone is post-menopausal and wants to do DE, I think the best path is DE + surrogacy, much safer for all parties involved.
Last edited by miraclex2 on October 3rd, 2011, 8:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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anne
anne

October 3rd, 2011, 8:28 pm #2

she died when she was 69 with what is believed to be ovarian cancer. not sure if causation could be proven here.

it wouldn't surprise me if the stimms caused it but don't know at what age she would have been trying for a babe.

i will probably switch to bio identical estrogen after my run is through. interesting factoid the oldest woman in britain gave birth at age 59 after upping her estrogen dosage for a romantic weekend.
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Yvonne
Yvonne

October 3rd, 2011, 10:39 pm #3

The multi-billionaire's fertility treatment story is in court documents because her estate was engaged in an ownership battle after her death.

This is a short excerpt - her sister is an obgyn doctor herself
http://www.rthk.org.hk/rthk/news/englis ... 587497.htm

I have been following lots of advanced age DE cases (60+), and I came across a few articles that followed their ongoing issues, I will try to get the links when I have time.

As I said before, you can do whatever you want to your pre-menopausal body, but once the physiological deadline is here, you'd better pay some respect. I am not saying an advanced age woman should not become a mother, she can use a surrogate to achieve the same goal, and preserve her own health in the meantime, for her own sake and for the baby.

In fact, if one is doing DE, the cost of surrogacy can be so much lower because you don't have the constraints of OE. Most of us are in high cost-of-living areas so if we do OE + surrogacy, the cost can be easily 2x of lower cost-of-living areas. For example, in California, it is very hard to find a surrogate that comes with medical insurance that will cover surrogacy, and there is only ONE surrogacy insurance you can buy, and the total cost is around $35K (because it has many exclusions, but you are buying to cover the catastrophic situations). If I were doing DE + surrogacy, I'd do it in Idaho, Iowa, and whole bunch of places without even going international where the cost is easily less than half of what I need to pay in California. And our surrogates charge easily $30-40K upwards to cover their cost of living as opposed to $10-15K in Iowa. Our agencies typically cost $18-20K, while agencies in Idaho charge $5K. Our cycle fee, C-section fee, whatever fees you can think of are simply 2-3x more than a lot of the states in between two coasts. But again, if you are going DE, you don't need to tie yourself to a surrogate along the coasts.

So if someone is post-menopausal and wants to do DE, I think the best path is DE + surrogacy, much safer for all parties involved.
I only see a short paragraph - and not an article...unless there is something happening with my computer.... but I do have a question about what I read.

She states that the high doses of estrogen that her sister was given during her fertility treatment was the cause of her ovarian cancer....Is the estrogen in the birth control pill not at a higher amt? If so - how can she state that as a cause?
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DeeinNYC
DeeinNYC

October 4th, 2011, 12:43 am #4

The multi-billionaire's fertility treatment story is in court documents because her estate was engaged in an ownership battle after her death.

This is a short excerpt - her sister is an obgyn doctor herself
http://www.rthk.org.hk/rthk/news/englis ... 587497.htm

I have been following lots of advanced age DE cases (60+), and I came across a few articles that followed their ongoing issues, I will try to get the links when I have time.

As I said before, you can do whatever you want to your pre-menopausal body, but once the physiological deadline is here, you'd better pay some respect. I am not saying an advanced age woman should not become a mother, she can use a surrogate to achieve the same goal, and preserve her own health in the meantime, for her own sake and for the baby.

In fact, if one is doing DE, the cost of surrogacy can be so much lower because you don't have the constraints of OE. Most of us are in high cost-of-living areas so if we do OE + surrogacy, the cost can be easily 2x of lower cost-of-living areas. For example, in California, it is very hard to find a surrogate that comes with medical insurance that will cover surrogacy, and there is only ONE surrogacy insurance you can buy, and the total cost is around $35K (because it has many exclusions, but you are buying to cover the catastrophic situations). If I were doing DE + surrogacy, I'd do it in Idaho, Iowa, and whole bunch of places without even going international where the cost is easily less than half of what I need to pay in California. And our surrogates charge easily $30-40K upwards to cover their cost of living as opposed to $10-15K in Iowa. Our agencies typically cost $18-20K, while agencies in Idaho charge $5K. Our cycle fee, C-section fee, whatever fees you can think of are simply 2-3x more than a lot of the states in between two coasts. But again, if you are going DE, you don't need to tie yourself to a surrogate along the coasts.

So if someone is post-menopausal and wants to do DE, I think the best path is DE + surrogacy, much safer for all parties involved.
As I said below, I have no quarrel with your opinion about whether post-menopausal women should pursue DE or not. In fact, I may agree with you in many respects and it would not be my choice. The point is that when you said that most if not all women that have had DE babies post-menopause die within 5 years of the birth of the DE baby, I thought that this statement was over the top and not based upon fact. It was also very upsetting and unsettling.

I actually read up on the Korean woman because I had a old friend that married a very wealthy Korean busniess woman and subsequently divorced her and I was wondering if this was her. In reading the articles I read, what I got from them is that it is "beleived" that she died from fertility treatment. All her sister can say in teh articlce you posted is that she believes that her sister died as a result of these treatments. Her statements should also be viewed in the context that she made these statements while her sisters will was being contested and seemed to blame her lover for making her pursue said treatments.

Bottom line however...lets say she did in fact die from these treatments. This is a long way from making and justifying the statement that you made. THAT was my point. This is not to say that many of us...myself included do not make statements based upon the information we have and to the best of our ability. We all do. I just think that when you say something as if it is a fact...especially something like that...you might want to be more careful. JMHO.
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MIckey
MIckey

October 4th, 2011, 3:35 am #5

The multi-billionaire's fertility treatment story is in court documents because her estate was engaged in an ownership battle after her death.

This is a short excerpt - her sister is an obgyn doctor herself
http://www.rthk.org.hk/rthk/news/englis ... 587497.htm

I have been following lots of advanced age DE cases (60+), and I came across a few articles that followed their ongoing issues, I will try to get the links when I have time.

As I said before, you can do whatever you want to your pre-menopausal body, but once the physiological deadline is here, you'd better pay some respect. I am not saying an advanced age woman should not become a mother, she can use a surrogate to achieve the same goal, and preserve her own health in the meantime, for her own sake and for the baby.

In fact, if one is doing DE, the cost of surrogacy can be so much lower because you don't have the constraints of OE. Most of us are in high cost-of-living areas so if we do OE + surrogacy, the cost can be easily 2x of lower cost-of-living areas. For example, in California, it is very hard to find a surrogate that comes with medical insurance that will cover surrogacy, and there is only ONE surrogacy insurance you can buy, and the total cost is around $35K (because it has many exclusions, but you are buying to cover the catastrophic situations). If I were doing DE + surrogacy, I'd do it in Idaho, Iowa, and whole bunch of places without even going international where the cost is easily less than half of what I need to pay in California. And our surrogates charge easily $30-40K upwards to cover their cost of living as opposed to $10-15K in Iowa. Our agencies typically cost $18-20K, while agencies in Idaho charge $5K. Our cycle fee, C-section fee, whatever fees you can think of are simply 2-3x more than a lot of the states in between two coasts. But again, if you are going DE, you don't need to tie yourself to a surrogate along the coasts.

So if someone is post-menopausal and wants to do DE, I think the best path is DE + surrogacy, much safer for all parties involved.
Yes, younger people can become ill/die, but the chances increase as one ages. This cannot be argued. The Korean woman's chances of dying of something (IF related or not) were much greater than those of a younger woman. What many people seem to miss in this argument is that there are sadly young chidren suffering the consequences. Although my heart goes out to those who did not choose to have children at a younger age and later regret it, it does not excuse the selfishness and self-centered thinking that some women have when they attempt DE in the late 40's-60 range. For goodness sakes, the first concern should be about the children, not about what these women think they deserve.
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BabyDance
BabyDance

October 4th, 2011, 3:50 am #6

The multi-billionaire's fertility treatment story is in court documents because her estate was engaged in an ownership battle after her death.

This is a short excerpt - her sister is an obgyn doctor herself
http://www.rthk.org.hk/rthk/news/englis ... 587497.htm

I have been following lots of advanced age DE cases (60+), and I came across a few articles that followed their ongoing issues, I will try to get the links when I have time.

As I said before, you can do whatever you want to your pre-menopausal body, but once the physiological deadline is here, you'd better pay some respect. I am not saying an advanced age woman should not become a mother, she can use a surrogate to achieve the same goal, and preserve her own health in the meantime, for her own sake and for the baby.

In fact, if one is doing DE, the cost of surrogacy can be so much lower because you don't have the constraints of OE. Most of us are in high cost-of-living areas so if we do OE + surrogacy, the cost can be easily 2x of lower cost-of-living areas. For example, in California, it is very hard to find a surrogate that comes with medical insurance that will cover surrogacy, and there is only ONE surrogacy insurance you can buy, and the total cost is around $35K (because it has many exclusions, but you are buying to cover the catastrophic situations). If I were doing DE + surrogacy, I'd do it in Idaho, Iowa, and whole bunch of places without even going international where the cost is easily less than half of what I need to pay in California. And our surrogates charge easily $30-40K upwards to cover their cost of living as opposed to $10-15K in Iowa. Our agencies typically cost $18-20K, while agencies in Idaho charge $5K. Our cycle fee, C-section fee, whatever fees you can think of are simply 2-3x more than a lot of the states in between two coasts. But again, if you are going DE, you don't need to tie yourself to a surrogate along the coasts.

So if someone is post-menopausal and wants to do DE, I think the best path is DE + surrogacy, much safer for all parties involved.
We come on here for inspiration, help, and support. Not to get friggin depressed. Who the f cares about this? Honestly, everyone is entitled to their own opinion on this and everyone chiming in is not going to change the laws, what the doctors do, or what any woman decides to do. Debating it on this board, when it belongs on the DE board, is just friggin upsetting already. If I were the moderator, I'd lock this out. I ALWAYS find it disconcerting and BEYOND irritating when someone who doesn't even usually participate on the board, just decides to chime in their STRONG opinion, without introducing themselves, or telling anything about their situation - it's rude, troll llike, and disrespectful to the people who actually regularly participate on the board.
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 4th, 2011, 4:00 am #7

I only see a short paragraph - and not an article...unless there is something happening with my computer.... but I do have a question about what I read.

She states that the high doses of estrogen that her sister was given during her fertility treatment was the cause of her ovarian cancer....Is the estrogen in the birth control pill not at a higher amt? If so - how can she state that as a cause?
the amount needed to bring back "period" for a post-menopausal woman. No US doctor would treat her, because probably due to ethical issues, and unlike the DE mothers, she was only interested in OE, which is basically impossible. She attempted human cloning on the side as well. I guess if she had all that money with no one to pass on to, she would go to extraordinary length to chase her dream.
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

October 4th, 2011, 4:02 am #8

As I said below, I have no quarrel with your opinion about whether post-menopausal women should pursue DE or not. In fact, I may agree with you in many respects and it would not be my choice. The point is that when you said that most if not all women that have had DE babies post-menopause die within 5 years of the birth of the DE baby, I thought that this statement was over the top and not based upon fact. It was also very upsetting and unsettling.

I actually read up on the Korean woman because I had a old friend that married a very wealthy Korean busniess woman and subsequently divorced her and I was wondering if this was her. In reading the articles I read, what I got from them is that it is "beleived" that she died from fertility treatment. All her sister can say in teh articlce you posted is that she believes that her sister died as a result of these treatments. Her statements should also be viewed in the context that she made these statements while her sisters will was being contested and seemed to blame her lover for making her pursue said treatments.

Bottom line however...lets say she did in fact die from these treatments. This is a long way from making and justifying the statement that you made. THAT was my point. This is not to say that many of us...myself included do not make statements based upon the information we have and to the best of our ability. We all do. I just think that when you say something as if it is a fact...especially something like that...you might want to be more careful. JMHO.
She was not Korean, she was Chinese
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BabyDance
BabyDance

October 4th, 2011, 12:56 pm #9

Getting tired of it, MIR, you really just don't get it.
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DeeinNYC
DeeinNYC

October 4th, 2011, 1:11 pm #10

She was not Korean, she was Chinese
I guess it would have been too easy for you to just simply say that I pulled that "fact" out of my nowhere and maybe I should not have.

As for my mistake...Yes...she was Chinese. My friend is Chinese and I thought he married a Chinese woman but found out she was Korean so I guess a Korean woman was on my mind. My mistake.
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