can three-person IVF overcome aging eggs?

can three-person IVF overcome aging eggs?

Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 6:01 pm #1

I read about the success of three person IVF in Britain, and was wondering if the same approach could be used to inject the nuclei of the fertilized egg between me and DH into another younger egg. It is sort of donor egg without losing the woman's part of the DNA completely, which is very a very acceptable solution to most people I believe.

Years ago I remember reading about such a technology being done in Utah to assist older women to have their own bio child. However, the practice was deemed unethical and banned. I am wondering where else in the world you can have such a procedure done?
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 6:09 pm #2

of IVF children from ooplasmic transplantation (injecting older women's DNA core into younger fertile women's oocyte), and so far the children tracked up to one year of age have proven to be healthy.

I am really intrigued about where else in the world can you find such treatment?
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H40+
H40+

August 3rd, 2011, 6:17 pm #3

I read about the success of three person IVF in Britain, and was wondering if the same approach could be used to inject the nuclei of the fertilized egg between me and DH into another younger egg. It is sort of donor egg without losing the woman's part of the DNA completely, which is very a very acceptable solution to most people I believe.

Years ago I remember reading about such a technology being done in Utah to assist older women to have their own bio child. However, the practice was deemed unethical and banned. I am wondering where else in the world you can have such a procedure done?
I think it doesn't help aging eggs, and I don't think it's allowed anywhere anyway. I agree, it sounded like a great fix at first. Too bad.

Cytoplasmic Transfer
Cytoplasmic Transfer involves the injection of a small amount of cytoplasm (the viscous semifluid inside an egg), taken from a donor egg, directly into the patient's eggs. The transferred cytoplasm is thought to contain components missing or abnormally functioning in the recipient egg. The aim of cytoplasmic transfer is to overcome any deficiencies that may exist in the cytoplasm of an egg while retaining the patient's genetic material.

Background
Early studies on cytoplasmic transfer in the monkey demonstrated that transfusion of cytoplasm from a mature egg into immature eggs conveyed developmental competence to some immature eggs. The cytoplasmic factors transferred may be specialized proteins, messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA), or mitochondria - units that generate energy for the egg which may enhance the quality of embryos. Unlike embryos from donor eggs, the embryos produced from cytoplasmic transfer carry the mother's genes.

Patient Selection
This procedure is particularly suited to patients that have a history of poor embryo quality (i.e. fragmentation , slow cleavage or arrested development) and failed implantation, but who make a reasonable number of eggs. Patient's are typically in their 30's. The procedure is usually not recommended for women over 40 since the main cause of implantation failure at this age is a genetic abnormality (for example, a missing or extra chromosome), and cytoplasmic transfer does not alter the genetic makeup of the egg (nucleus).

http://www.fertile.com/icsi-and-ivf.html
http://www.lasvegasfertility.net/prod.html
http://www.test.sbivf.com/ivf_cyto.htm


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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 6:28 pm #4

Cytoplasmic transfer involves injecting the DNA core of the recipient oocyte into the donor oocyte, and then fertilize. This procedure eradicates the DNA of the donor oocyte completely.

However, the three-parent IVF injects the core of the fertilized egg into the donor oocyte, and does NOT eradicate the DNA of the donor completely, and this technology is apparently more mature.

Currently UK authority is reviewing this technology and everything looks like a go. I just hope they don't take too long

The gini is out of the bottle. I am very, very convinced that our children's generation, they can already pick and choose which genes get to stay, which get to go, and they can create oocyte out of any stem cells. We are just unfortunately stuck in the dark tunnel that is very close to the end. The Gattaca world is just around the corner, and yet the stupid government authorities think they can hold it back. Life finds a way, as always.
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Joined: March 5th, 2011, 3:53 am

August 3rd, 2011, 6:32 pm #5

MIR is correct. different procedures, Cyto using eggs of different stages nt
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 6:41 pm #6

That is a very reasonable compromise, hey, I would even be happy with 20%!
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alima
alima

August 3rd, 2011, 6:45 pm #7

I read about the success of three person IVF in Britain, and was wondering if the same approach could be used to inject the nuclei of the fertilized egg between me and DH into another younger egg. It is sort of donor egg without losing the woman's part of the DNA completely, which is very a very acceptable solution to most people I believe.

Years ago I remember reading about such a technology being done in Utah to assist older women to have their own bio child. However, the practice was deemed unethical and banned. I am wondering where else in the world you can have such a procedure done?
I started looking into this late last year, but I couldn't find any centers that would do this even for research purposes.
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H40+
H40+

August 3rd, 2011, 6:49 pm #8

Cytoplasmic transfer involves injecting the DNA core of the recipient oocyte into the donor oocyte, and then fertilize. This procedure eradicates the DNA of the donor oocyte completely.

However, the three-parent IVF injects the core of the fertilized egg into the donor oocyte, and does NOT eradicate the DNA of the donor completely, and this technology is apparently more mature.

Currently UK authority is reviewing this technology and everything looks like a go. I just hope they don't take too long

The gini is out of the bottle. I am very, very convinced that our children's generation, they can already pick and choose which genes get to stay, which get to go, and they can create oocyte out of any stem cells. We are just unfortunately stuck in the dark tunnel that is very close to the end. The Gattaca world is just around the corner, and yet the stupid government authorities think they can hold it back. Life finds a way, as always.
That's the only reason I mentioned it. I did a lot research as well, because I thought it would be a panacea, but it doesn't look like there's been much movement towards making this a procedure available to the general public.
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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 7:51 pm #9

I read about the success of three person IVF in Britain, and was wondering if the same approach could be used to inject the nuclei of the fertilized egg between me and DH into another younger egg. It is sort of donor egg without losing the woman's part of the DNA completely, which is very a very acceptable solution to most people I believe.

Years ago I remember reading about such a technology being done in Utah to assist older women to have their own bio child. However, the practice was deemed unethical and banned. I am wondering where else in the world you can have such a procedure done?
http://miniivf.com/cytoplasmic-transfer.shtml

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Joined: December 20th, 2010, 7:38 pm

August 3rd, 2011, 8:05 pm #10

What's particularly interesting is the maternal spindle transfer, which is a technique equivalent to that of cytoplasmic nuclear transfer. I am going to put in some phone calls to Newcastle to see what they are up to.

http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/short ... eir-w.html
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