stupid ?, but how much water is a "ton" of water for everyone

stupid ?, but how much water is a "ton" of water for everyone

Anonymous
Anonymous

January 28th, 2011, 3:12 pm #1

I have been trying to increase my water intake and I am wondering if its still enough? I take 8-10 cups a day usually. Are you drinking more? Please share if you know about how much your quantity is in actual measurement. Thanks so much!
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worldtraveler
worldtraveler

January 28th, 2011, 3:14 pm #2

so a little over 8 to 10 cups. Feels like a lot though.
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Dee
Dee

January 28th, 2011, 4:59 pm #3

I have been trying to increase my water intake and I am wondering if its still enough? I take 8-10 cups a day usually. Are you drinking more? Please share if you know about how much your quantity is in actual measurement. Thanks so much!
Its a myth that you need to drink tons of water to stay healthy. You can get an electrolyte imbalance if you drink too much.
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Joined: November 20th, 2006, 6:03 pm

January 28th, 2011, 5:48 pm #4

I have been trying to increase my water intake and I am wondering if its still enough? I take 8-10 cups a day usually. Are you drinking more? Please share if you know about how much your quantity is in actual measurement. Thanks so much!
though needs vary, you need about 8 x 8oz glasses a day to replace lost fluids - so about 64 oz. Here's one link that's helpful:
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/water/NU00283
Other fluids count toward this total though (except for diuretics like coffee).
Best,
Kenny
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Dee
Dee

January 28th, 2011, 6:15 pm #5

also states that the "8 by 8" rule is not supported by scientific evidence. Which is what I have always read, as well. That article also states that water needs vary from one individual to the next. Someone who already gets lots of fluids from their diet, might not do well drinking 8 glasses of water a day. It might be too much for them. Water can be toxic in smaller amounts than what you might think. If you start to notice tingling in your legs, you may have an electrolyte imbalance and need to cut back on water.
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Joined: November 20th, 2006, 6:03 pm

January 28th, 2011, 9:03 pm #6

except for a few "extreme exercisers" who had eating disorders and drank waaay more than the reco we're discussing. I've been curious about this too as I tend to drink a ton of water and worried that it might be a sign of impending diabetes (I'm thirsty a lot despite a fairly healthy/ not high-sodium diet), and in response to my questions (and normal blood sugar results), my endocrinologist, Ob and GP have always said it would be nearly impossible to drink too much b/c I'd be so uncomfortable in trying to do so that I'd stop, and not to worry about it. They also said far better to have a couple of extra glasses that were "not needed" than to not have enough fluids, esp while ttc, pg or bf'ing. Anyway they all said at the reco'd levels (64oz/2L daily) it would be nearly impossible for a healthy adult to have any adverse effects from water (although will admit I've never tried to drink that much liquid at one time - I think my bladder would explode LOL). My drs' recommendations have always been in line with each other - if in doubt that I'm staying getting enough fluids, keep track and get in the 8 x 8. OTOH, if I'm peeing a lot (several times a day, substantial volume, and PALE in color) and not feeling any signs of dehydration - for me that would be headache and tiredness, and when pg contractions, and when bf'ing not enough milk - then I really don't need to worry about it. I don't keep track but for once in a while if I think I'm forgetting to drink enough fluids throughout the day, or if I notice one of the "symptoms" I just ment'd. I still think 64oz of fluids is a pretty good rule of thumb based on my own drs statements, especially given many people don't have stellar diets full of fruit and veggies every day - but then I don't force myself to keep drinking when I feel full, or even keep track all that often so... Anyway, enough from me. Best,
Kenny
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Dee
Dee

January 28th, 2011, 11:53 pm #7

Your doctors said it was impossible to drink too much water? Your doctors need to go back to medical school. We recently discussed this in my college biology course: People have died from drinking too much water. In fact, there was a woman recently who died from drinking too much water in a water drinking contest, where she was drinking an 8 ounce bottle of water every 15 minutes. Even if you don't drink so much that you die, you can drink so much that it negatively affects your health. It is not normal to guzzle down water all the time. It IS normal to just drink when you thirsty. Listen to your body. If your body says, I'm not thirsty, there is no serious need to drink water.

It is normal to drink only when you are thirsty. And its a myth that you are already dehydrated when you are thirsty. If you were truly dehydrated, you'd wind up in the hospital.

A woman in my Weight Watchers class talked about how she quit drinking water all the time, and discussed the health problems it caused for her with electrolyte imbalance, which resulted in muscle cramps, nausea, etc.

http://www.wrongdiagnosis.com/w/water_i ... /intro.htm

http://chemistry.about.com/cs/5/f/blwaterintox.htm

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Dee
Dee

January 28th, 2011, 11:54 pm #8

except for a few "extreme exercisers" who had eating disorders and drank waaay more than the reco we're discussing. I've been curious about this too as I tend to drink a ton of water and worried that it might be a sign of impending diabetes (I'm thirsty a lot despite a fairly healthy/ not high-sodium diet), and in response to my questions (and normal blood sugar results), my endocrinologist, Ob and GP have always said it would be nearly impossible to drink too much b/c I'd be so uncomfortable in trying to do so that I'd stop, and not to worry about it. They also said far better to have a couple of extra glasses that were "not needed" than to not have enough fluids, esp while ttc, pg or bf'ing. Anyway they all said at the reco'd levels (64oz/2L daily) it would be nearly impossible for a healthy adult to have any adverse effects from water (although will admit I've never tried to drink that much liquid at one time - I think my bladder would explode LOL). My drs' recommendations have always been in line with each other - if in doubt that I'm staying getting enough fluids, keep track and get in the 8 x 8. OTOH, if I'm peeing a lot (several times a day, substantial volume, and PALE in color) and not feeling any signs of dehydration - for me that would be headache and tiredness, and when pg contractions, and when bf'ing not enough milk - then I really don't need to worry about it. I don't keep track but for once in a while if I think I'm forgetting to drink enough fluids throughout the day, or if I notice one of the "symptoms" I just ment'd. I still think 64oz of fluids is a pretty good rule of thumb based on my own drs statements, especially given many people don't have stellar diets full of fruit and veggies every day - but then I don't force myself to keep drinking when I feel full, or even keep track all that often so... Anyway, enough from me. Best,
Kenny
Can You Really Drink Too Much Water?

In a word, yes. Drinking too much water can lead to a condition known as water intoxication and to a related problem resulting from the dilution of sodium in the body, hyponatremia. Water intoxication is most commonly seen in infants under six months of age and sometimes in athletes. A baby can get water intoxication as a result of drinking several bottles of water a day or from drinking infant formula that has been diluted too much. Athletes can also suffer from water intoxication. Athletes sweat heavily, losing both water and electrolytes. Water intoxication and hyponatremia result when a dehydrated person drinks too much water without the accompanying electrolytes.

What Happens During Water Intoxication?

When too much water enters the body's cells, the tissues swell with the excess fluid. Your cells maintain a specific concentration gradient, so excess water outside the cells (the serum) draws sodium from within the cells out into the serum in an attempt to re-establish the necessary concentration. As more water accumulates, the serum sodium concentration drops -- a condition known as hyponatremia. The other way cells try to regain the electrolyte balance is for water outside the cells to rush into the cells via osmosis. The movement of water across a semipermeable membrane from higher to lower concentration is called osmosis. Although electrolytes are more concentrated inside the cells than outside, the water outside the cells is 'more concentrated' or 'less dilute' since it contains fewer electrolytes. Both electrolytes and water move across the cell membrane in an effort to balance concentration. Theoretically, cells could swell to the point of bursting.

From the cell's point of view, water intoxication produces the same effects as would result from drowning in fresh water. Electrolyte imbalance and tissue swelling can cause an irregular heartbeat, allow fluid to enter the lungs, and may cause fluttering eyelids. Swelling puts pressure on the brain and nerves, which can cause behaviors resembling alcohol intoxication. Swelling of brain tissues can cause seizures, coma and ultimately death unless water intake is restricted and a hypertonic saline (salt) solution is administered. If treatment is given before tissue swelling causes too much cellular damage, then a complete recovery can be expected within a few days.

It's Not How Much You Drink, It's How Fast You Drink It!

The kidneys of a healthy adult can process fifteen liters of water a day! You are unlikely to suffer from water intoxication, even if you drink a lot of water, as long as you drink over time as opposed to intaking an enormous volume at one time. As a general guideline, most adults need about three quarts of fluid each day. Much of that water comes from food, so 8-12 eight ounce glasses a day is a common recommended intake. You may need more water if the weather is very warm or very dry, if you are exercising, or if you are taking certain medications. The bottom line is this: it's possible to drink too much water, but unless you are running a marathon or an infant, water intoxication is a very uncommon condition.

http://chemistry.about.com/od/howthings ... sticks.htm
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worldtraveler
worldtraveler

January 29th, 2011, 1:50 am #9

I think what Kenny is trying to say is that a reasonable person drinking a reasonable amount of water is not going to do significant damage to themselves. And we know that keeping hydrated does have a positive effect on growing the lining. I don't think anyone here is proposing to join a water drinking contest.
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Joined: June 28th, 2008, 7:01 pm

January 29th, 2011, 3:17 am #10

Whereas hyponatremia has sometimes been a problem in endurance athletic events like running marathons, in general, a person going about their normal day is not going to drink too much water unless they are taking it to an extreme, such as a water drinking contest. Nor do I think Kenny was referring to infants either. That's a different story.

But, it is possible to be dehydrated without ending up in the hospital. This has happened to me on a few occasions. It happens when training for am marathon and also sometimes if I don't drink enough and I go on a long flight. It results in a bad headache, bright colored urine, etc. Not anything severe, but it definitely can be avoided if I drink more water/liquids. I once had a really bad gastrointestinal bug. Eventually, with a fever of 104, I walked into the hospital after my final in college. I was very dehydrated and they put in 6 liters and I only weighted 95lbs at the time. But the dehydration isn't what prompted me to go to the hospital, it was the fever. Also, my sister and sister in law both got dehydrated during their pregnancies as they both had severe ms. They were regulars at the ER, getting IVs on at least a weekly basis.

But, the whole point is, this is a "generally speaking" sort of thing. I don't think someone would be in any sort of danger by following an 8X8 sort of rule. I am willing to bet that the weight watchers dieter was drinking extreme amounts of water to try to fill herself up and avoid eating or taking in too many caloric foods.
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