question about embryos and quality, for pregnancy

question about embryos and quality, for pregnancy

Dee
Dee

July 15th, 2012, 8:53 pm #1

Why do so many embryos "never make it" to become a pregnancy?

It seems someone can have a batch of embryos and only one will stick, or none. While others may get twins or triplets out of a group of embryos.

Has anyone who has done multiple IVFs noticed a pattern in each batch of embryos? Or is each one different?
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Joined: September 29th, 2010, 9:51 pm

July 15th, 2012, 11:05 pm #2

Barging in here - not sure this will be an answer since I never made it to IVF but when I was a patient with Dr. Check at Cooper - the reason why he is so adament on starting with natural cycles or low stim IVF is that he believes there is really one (maybe two) true selected eggs that mature each cycle. Of course doing high stim could break that barrier but often times if you get a whole lot of eggs most of them won't make it. That was my understanding. Other Check ladies I am sure can give a better explaination.
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Lisa
Lisa

July 15th, 2012, 11:20 pm #3

Why do so many embryos "never make it" to become a pregnancy?

It seems someone can have a batch of embryos and only one will stick, or none. While others may get twins or triplets out of a group of embryos.

Has anyone who has done multiple IVFs noticed a pattern in each batch of embryos? Or is each one different?
I have been thinking the same thing since I got my BFN. What is the rhyme or reason here?
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Joined: September 13th, 2008, 5:13 pm

July 16th, 2012, 2:46 pm #4

Why do so many embryos "never make it" to become a pregnancy?

It seems someone can have a batch of embryos and only one will stick, or none. While others may get twins or triplets out of a group of embryos.

Has anyone who has done multiple IVFs noticed a pattern in each batch of embryos? Or is each one different?
IVF tampers with a natural process in which many gametes and embryos don't survive. So, for example, if you use ICSI (and don't augment it with PICSI), the embryologist is selecting sperm based solely on morphology and the other characteristics he or she knows suggest a spermatozoa is healthy, while in natural conception, hundreds of thousands of sperm vie to fertilize the egg. Rebekah, mentions her RE's conviction that it's better to start with mini IVF to try to get the best quality egg, and the Czech clinic where I cycled uses gentle stimulation on its donors for the same reason. And even then, researchers believe that a startling number of early pregnancies fail, usually before the woman even knows she's pregnant, and that probably includes in the first 5 days after fertilization. So, on one hand, the selection processes are imperfect, and on the other hand, we see more of the failure that occurs over time and in the shadows in natural conception.

Best to you,

Maggie (in VA)
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Joined: April 14th, 2003, 10:59 pm

July 16th, 2012, 4:58 pm #5

Why do so many embryos "never make it" to become a pregnancy?

It seems someone can have a batch of embryos and only one will stick, or none. While others may get twins or triplets out of a group of embryos.

Has anyone who has done multiple IVFs noticed a pattern in each batch of embryos? Or is each one different?
Although there has never been any type of qualitative study to back this up, most embryologists believe that more than 70% of the time that sperm and egg meet in normal reproduction, that it does not make a baby. Most of the time, it results in a m/c before the woman would ever know she was pregnant.

So in natural reproduction, roughly 70% of embryos are abnormal or fail to implant and divide.

IVF tries to mimic natural reproduction and compensate for any known inefficiencies (say blocked tubes or male infertility.) And in IVF, more eggs ovulate at once---so there are more chances to get things right. And more chances to get things wrong.

And don't forget, too, that current testing methods, CGH and PGD are both invasive. They involve taking a cell out of the embryo at an early stage. There is a lot of thought that embryos are self-correcting and the things that they tested positive for MAY have naturally "self-corrected" if left alone. (Lots of non-invasive testing on the horizon)

And, every aspect of every cycle is unique. And sadly, all clinic labs are NOT created equally. There are reasons why some labs are so much better than others. And generally, you will pay for that.

It is frustrating. even more so, because this is such a young field of medicine. And this is a field which has seen research severely hampered by politics. There has never been any government funding into why an embryo ultimately becomes a baby. None.

So there are many, many reasons why a batch of embryos may not work. And rarely are the answers quite clear-cut.



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