BIZARRE question but I'm sure you've heard it all

BIZARRE question but I'm sure you've heard it all

Anonymous
Anonymous

November 26th, 2010, 11:12 pm #1

I know that a donor e-g-g doesn't contain your genetic material. It's inherent to the process. BUT the fact that the DE embryo attaches to you and feeds off you and lives off you for 38 weeks...doesn't your own genetic material (or SOMETHING) "meld" into the developing embryo/fetus?
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Anon
Anon

November 26th, 2010, 11:35 pm #2

my son has exactly my birthmark. How does that happpen??
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Ariadne
Ariadne

November 26th, 2010, 11:58 pm #3

I know that a donor e-g-g doesn't contain your genetic material. It's inherent to the process. BUT the fact that the DE embryo attaches to you and feeds off you and lives off you for 38 weeks...doesn't your own genetic material (or SOMETHING) "meld" into the developing embryo/fetus?
The best place to start is doing a board search here b/c some posters have linked articles they found good or provided good explanations.

It's pretty amazing.

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Skye
Skye

November 27th, 2010, 12:01 am #4

I know that a donor e-g-g doesn't contain your genetic material. It's inherent to the process. BUT the fact that the DE embryo attaches to you and feeds off you and lives off you for 38 weeks...doesn't your own genetic material (or SOMETHING) "meld" into the developing embryo/fetus?
Yes! Your DNA will not meld into the embryo , however your body and the uterine environment you provide will influence which genes get turned on or off. So you can have a huge influence. Look up "epigenetics" on the internet to learn more. I've seen a few articles relating to donor egg and this subject and just also relating to how important the uterine environment can be for anyone's offspring. One study looked at the effects of a famine during pregnancies and found it had effects on how genes were expressed for several generations. Fascinating stuff.
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Kekona
Kekona

November 27th, 2010, 12:48 am #5

I know that a donor e-g-g doesn't contain your genetic material. It's inherent to the process. BUT the fact that the DE embryo attaches to you and feeds off you and lives off you for 38 weeks...doesn't your own genetic material (or SOMETHING) "meld" into the developing embryo/fetus?
will also remain in your body -- it's called microchimerism. Unfortunately, for some women, it may be linked to autoimmune diseases, but aside from that, I like the idea that your baby is always with you.
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aw2006
aw2006

November 27th, 2010, 2:49 pm #6

I know that a donor e-g-g doesn't contain your genetic material. It's inherent to the process. BUT the fact that the DE embryo attaches to you and feeds off you and lives off you for 38 weeks...doesn't your own genetic material (or SOMETHING) "meld" into the developing embryo/fetus?
From what I've read about epigenetics there is also a factor of RNA involved - well messages from your RNA. These messages turn off/on traits in the DNA of the baby. If the embryo was placed into the donor's uterus, the baby would look/act completely different than the embryo that develops in your own uterus. I have always looked at donor eggs as 50% my husband, 25% donor, 25% me (although the percentages between me & donor are just arbitrarilty chosen by me - no scientific data to back it).
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Anonymous
Anonymous

November 27th, 2010, 6:50 pm #7

my son has exactly my birthmark. How does that happpen??
you hit the jackpot there!!
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orig anon
orig anon

November 27th, 2010, 6:51 pm #8

The best place to start is doing a board search here b/c some posters have linked articles they found good or provided good explanations.

It's pretty amazing.
never heard the term at all but thanks for the lead!!
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orig anon
orig anon

November 27th, 2010, 6:53 pm #9

Yes! Your DNA will not meld into the embryo , however your body and the uterine environment you provide will influence which genes get turned on or off. So you can have a huge influence. Look up "epigenetics" on the internet to learn more. I've seen a few articles relating to donor egg and this subject and just also relating to how important the uterine environment can be for anyone's offspring. One study looked at the effects of a famine during pregnancies and found it had effects on how genes were expressed for several generations. Fascinating stuff.
thank you! (n/t)
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orig anon
orig anon

November 27th, 2010, 6:53 pm #10

will also remain in your body -- it's called microchimerism. Unfortunately, for some women, it may be linked to autoimmune diseases, but aside from that, I like the idea that your baby is always with you.
thanks for the lead!!
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