White Line Couloir

White Line Couloir

Bob (for Kevin, Aaron and Joe)
Bob (for Kevin, Aaron and Joe)

May 1st, 2012, 10:35 pm #1

After a lengthy conversation with Dean Lords about the Lost River Range he recommended I climb a route he pioneered back in 1996 on peak 11,308. The route is called White Line Couloir He mentioned that it probably is in and fat, but I have never heard of anyone climbing it in those conditions.

I called a new friend from Boise Aaron Z. to see if he'd be interested as well as a friend of a friend Joe Crane from Rexburg. The three of us met at the Mt. Borah trailhead on Friday night. Temps dipped down into the teens and the mountains were veiled in clouds. Too lazy to set up a tent, the three of us slept in our perspective cars. The 4:30 AM alarm came earlier than normal. By the time we all drove to the new trail head drove up to the power lines it was 5:30AM. Not a bad alpine start.





The going was slow and conversation was pleasant. The approach to get to the base of the route at 9,300 took us a little over 3 hours.



We quickly set up a belay station and Aaron wanted to sharp end first.



Conditions weren't awesome because of new verglas and snow draped over rock.



The going was sketchy and Aaron protected the crux with 6 pieces of gear. All three of us were thinking if the route is like this we should bail. We put it to a vote and for the sake of doing it we decided to press on. A VW bus sized chalkstone guards the way to the upper pitches.



Pitch two was just a steep snow hike to another small blockage.



Joe crushed it as he motored past the hardest pitch which is rated at M5.



I wish I had more experience with dry ratings so I could confirm this but this was my first experience dry tooling.



Pitch 4 Aaron again displayed great skill moving up tight chimneys, and pulling over awkward chalkstones.



I got the 5th pitch and was awarded the finest views of the top of the route. A fixed Hex on climbing rope welcomed us to a big window and the top of the last pitch.



The sky was bluebird and the company top notch.



Smelling the barn, I sat down and enjoyed a fun Glissade down the avalanche chute. The sun came out and warmed up the top 2-3 inches. This made for perfect butt sliding. I dropped over 1,000 in just 5 minutes. Joe and Aaron played things a little more conservative and walked down. They were able to steal away a few photos.

Will I do it again? Maybe, but not anytime soon. Requisite statement for most routes in the Lost Rivers is "It would be easier if there were more ice." We didn't have enough ice to place one screw though we took 6. Gear? I wish we only took 1 set of nuts, 3 pitons, and 10 slings. If there is ice, 3 short screws would be plenty. Dinner at Pickles was perfect. I drove and slept, drove and slept till I got home at 4:30 AM.

Kevin Hansen
Reply
Share

Joined: October 31st, 2011, 6:49 pm

May 1st, 2012, 11:18 pm #2

Nice photos and report! I'll have to add this one to my list . . .
Reply
Like
Share

Eric Larsen
Eric Larsen

May 2nd, 2012, 12:08 am #3

After a lengthy conversation with Dean Lords about the Lost River Range he recommended I climb a route he pioneered back in 1996 on peak 11,308. The route is called White Line Couloir He mentioned that it probably is in and fat, but I have never heard of anyone climbing it in those conditions.

I called a new friend from Boise Aaron Z. to see if he'd be interested as well as a friend of a friend Joe Crane from Rexburg. The three of us met at the Mt. Borah trailhead on Friday night. Temps dipped down into the teens and the mountains were veiled in clouds. Too lazy to set up a tent, the three of us slept in our perspective cars. The 4:30 AM alarm came earlier than normal. By the time we all drove to the new trail head drove up to the power lines it was 5:30AM. Not a bad alpine start.





The going was slow and conversation was pleasant. The approach to get to the base of the route at 9,300 took us a little over 3 hours.



We quickly set up a belay station and Aaron wanted to sharp end first.



Conditions weren't awesome because of new verglas and snow draped over rock.



The going was sketchy and Aaron protected the crux with 6 pieces of gear. All three of us were thinking if the route is like this we should bail. We put it to a vote and for the sake of doing it we decided to press on. A VW bus sized chalkstone guards the way to the upper pitches.



Pitch two was just a steep snow hike to another small blockage.



Joe crushed it as he motored past the hardest pitch which is rated at M5.



I wish I had more experience with dry ratings so I could confirm this but this was my first experience dry tooling.



Pitch 4 Aaron again displayed great skill moving up tight chimneys, and pulling over awkward chalkstones.



I got the 5th pitch and was awarded the finest views of the top of the route. A fixed Hex on climbing rope welcomed us to a big window and the top of the last pitch.



The sky was bluebird and the company top notch.



Smelling the barn, I sat down and enjoyed a fun Glissade down the avalanche chute. The sun came out and warmed up the top 2-3 inches. This made for perfect butt sliding. I dropped over 1,000 in just 5 minutes. Joe and Aaron played things a little more conservative and walked down. They were able to steal away a few photos.

Will I do it again? Maybe, but not anytime soon. Requisite statement for most routes in the Lost Rivers is "It would be easier if there were more ice." We didn't have enough ice to place one screw though we took 6. Gear? I wish we only took 1 set of nuts, 3 pitons, and 10 slings. If there is ice, 3 short screws would be plenty. Dinner at Pickles was perfect. I drove and slept, drove and slept till I got home at 4:30 AM.

Kevin Hansen
Strong effort! Way to stick with it. Looks like a great day.
Reply
Share

splattski
splattski

May 2nd, 2012, 3:34 am #4

After a lengthy conversation with Dean Lords about the Lost River Range he recommended I climb a route he pioneered back in 1996 on peak 11,308. The route is called White Line Couloir He mentioned that it probably is in and fat, but I have never heard of anyone climbing it in those conditions.

I called a new friend from Boise Aaron Z. to see if he'd be interested as well as a friend of a friend Joe Crane from Rexburg. The three of us met at the Mt. Borah trailhead on Friday night. Temps dipped down into the teens and the mountains were veiled in clouds. Too lazy to set up a tent, the three of us slept in our perspective cars. The 4:30 AM alarm came earlier than normal. By the time we all drove to the new trail head drove up to the power lines it was 5:30AM. Not a bad alpine start.





The going was slow and conversation was pleasant. The approach to get to the base of the route at 9,300 took us a little over 3 hours.



We quickly set up a belay station and Aaron wanted to sharp end first.



Conditions weren't awesome because of new verglas and snow draped over rock.



The going was sketchy and Aaron protected the crux with 6 pieces of gear. All three of us were thinking if the route is like this we should bail. We put it to a vote and for the sake of doing it we decided to press on. A VW bus sized chalkstone guards the way to the upper pitches.



Pitch two was just a steep snow hike to another small blockage.



Joe crushed it as he motored past the hardest pitch which is rated at M5.



I wish I had more experience with dry ratings so I could confirm this but this was my first experience dry tooling.



Pitch 4 Aaron again displayed great skill moving up tight chimneys, and pulling over awkward chalkstones.



I got the 5th pitch and was awarded the finest views of the top of the route. A fixed Hex on climbing rope welcomed us to a big window and the top of the last pitch.



The sky was bluebird and the company top notch.



Smelling the barn, I sat down and enjoyed a fun Glissade down the avalanche chute. The sun came out and warmed up the top 2-3 inches. This made for perfect butt sliding. I dropped over 1,000 in just 5 minutes. Joe and Aaron played things a little more conservative and walked down. They were able to steal away a few photos.

Will I do it again? Maybe, but not anytime soon. Requisite statement for most routes in the Lost Rivers is "It would be easier if there were more ice." We didn't have enough ice to place one screw though we took 6. Gear? I wish we only took 1 set of nuts, 3 pitons, and 10 slings. If there is ice, 3 short screws would be plenty. Dinner at Pickles was perfect. I drove and slept, drove and slept till I got home at 4:30 AM.

Kevin Hansen
Looks like you guys had a great adventure in less than ideal conditions. Way to go. Thanks for the TR!
Reply
Share

Joined: October 3rd, 2006, 6:10 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 4:05 pm #5

After a lengthy conversation with Dean Lords about the Lost River Range he recommended I climb a route he pioneered back in 1996 on peak 11,308. The route is called White Line Couloir He mentioned that it probably is in and fat, but I have never heard of anyone climbing it in those conditions.

I called a new friend from Boise Aaron Z. to see if he'd be interested as well as a friend of a friend Joe Crane from Rexburg. The three of us met at the Mt. Borah trailhead on Friday night. Temps dipped down into the teens and the mountains were veiled in clouds. Too lazy to set up a tent, the three of us slept in our perspective cars. The 4:30 AM alarm came earlier than normal. By the time we all drove to the new trail head drove up to the power lines it was 5:30AM. Not a bad alpine start.





The going was slow and conversation was pleasant. The approach to get to the base of the route at 9,300 took us a little over 3 hours.



We quickly set up a belay station and Aaron wanted to sharp end first.



Conditions weren't awesome because of new verglas and snow draped over rock.



The going was sketchy and Aaron protected the crux with 6 pieces of gear. All three of us were thinking if the route is like this we should bail. We put it to a vote and for the sake of doing it we decided to press on. A VW bus sized chalkstone guards the way to the upper pitches.



Pitch two was just a steep snow hike to another small blockage.



Joe crushed it as he motored past the hardest pitch which is rated at M5.



I wish I had more experience with dry ratings so I could confirm this but this was my first experience dry tooling.



Pitch 4 Aaron again displayed great skill moving up tight chimneys, and pulling over awkward chalkstones.



I got the 5th pitch and was awarded the finest views of the top of the route. A fixed Hex on climbing rope welcomed us to a big window and the top of the last pitch.



The sky was bluebird and the company top notch.



Smelling the barn, I sat down and enjoyed a fun Glissade down the avalanche chute. The sun came out and warmed up the top 2-3 inches. This made for perfect butt sliding. I dropped over 1,000 in just 5 minutes. Joe and Aaron played things a little more conservative and walked down. They were able to steal away a few photos.

Will I do it again? Maybe, but not anytime soon. Requisite statement for most routes in the Lost Rivers is "It would be easier if there were more ice." We didn't have enough ice to place one screw though we took 6. Gear? I wish we only took 1 set of nuts, 3 pitons, and 10 slings. If there is ice, 3 short screws would be plenty. Dinner at Pickles was perfect. I drove and slept, drove and slept till I got home at 4:30 AM.

Kevin Hansen
As many of you well know, I'm not tech savy at all. I sent everything to Bob, and he prouced what you see today. He is a great help, and good friend.
I would love to climb with Z-man and Joe again. In fact, on the long hike down all of us were talking about the next trip. Good times.
If you are wondering what its like climbing this route. The closest thing I've climbed that resembles this is "The Gap" south of Pocatello near Arimo ID. "the Gap" is a small ice formation (1 short pitch of wi2) with several pithes of snow covered rock above. In our conditions White Line was just like it, with out the ice.
Kevin
Reply
Like
Share

Joined: October 31st, 2011, 6:49 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 5:21 pm #6

I assume you mean Garden Creek Gap? A friend and I drove down a couple months ago and did a route in there. Fun climbing! Plenty of snow, snice, and rock, but I didn't find much actual ice on our route (never enough to place a screw), but the rock was surprisingly (mostly) good and there were a lot of places for good rock gear. It's pretty cool to have such fun winter climbing that is literally roadside. I'll be back down there next winter for sure!
Reply
Like
Share

Bob
Bob

May 2nd, 2012, 6:04 pm #7

As many of you well know, I'm not tech savy at all. I sent everything to Bob, and he prouced what you see today. He is a great help, and good friend.
I would love to climb with Z-man and Joe again. In fact, on the long hike down all of us were talking about the next trip. Good times.
If you are wondering what its like climbing this route. The closest thing I've climbed that resembles this is "The Gap" south of Pocatello near Arimo ID. "the Gap" is a small ice formation (1 short pitch of wi2) with several pithes of snow covered rock above. In our conditions White Line was just like it, with out the ice.
Kevin
Hey man, you know I'd give you the crampons off my feet and the food in my pack.

I am your biggest armchair fan. There's nothing like sitting in my sunroom (it's 80 in here) looking at photos of people climbing with goose feather jackets and full winter gear.

bob
Reply
Share

Joined: October 3rd, 2006, 6:10 pm

May 2nd, 2012, 10:06 pm #8

True to my word, anything on the Pickles menu is your my treat. I'm thinking I'll make good, this coming Aug and Sept.

To CORY, yes the Garden Creek Gap is the route I was talking about. Thin this year, not worth the drive from Boise. I guess if your going to drive across the state, head to Teton Canyon. It always pleases and will never let you down. It would be neet to see what conditions are like on White Line this coming weekend. Anyone wana go with CORY?
Reply
Like
Share

wes
wes

May 3rd, 2012, 10:04 pm #9

Really cool Trip guys!
Reply
Share

deanlords
deanlords

May 21st, 2012, 3:59 pm #10

After a lengthy conversation with Dean Lords about the Lost River Range he recommended I climb a route he pioneered back in 1996 on peak 11,308. The route is called White Line Couloir He mentioned that it probably is in and fat, but I have never heard of anyone climbing it in those conditions.

I called a new friend from Boise Aaron Z. to see if he'd be interested as well as a friend of a friend Joe Crane from Rexburg. The three of us met at the Mt. Borah trailhead on Friday night. Temps dipped down into the teens and the mountains were veiled in clouds. Too lazy to set up a tent, the three of us slept in our perspective cars. The 4:30 AM alarm came earlier than normal. By the time we all drove to the new trail head drove up to the power lines it was 5:30AM. Not a bad alpine start.





The going was slow and conversation was pleasant. The approach to get to the base of the route at 9,300 took us a little over 3 hours.



We quickly set up a belay station and Aaron wanted to sharp end first.



Conditions weren't awesome because of new verglas and snow draped over rock.



The going was sketchy and Aaron protected the crux with 6 pieces of gear. All three of us were thinking if the route is like this we should bail. We put it to a vote and for the sake of doing it we decided to press on. A VW bus sized chalkstone guards the way to the upper pitches.



Pitch two was just a steep snow hike to another small blockage.



Joe crushed it as he motored past the hardest pitch which is rated at M5.



I wish I had more experience with dry ratings so I could confirm this but this was my first experience dry tooling.



Pitch 4 Aaron again displayed great skill moving up tight chimneys, and pulling over awkward chalkstones.



I got the 5th pitch and was awarded the finest views of the top of the route. A fixed Hex on climbing rope welcomed us to a big window and the top of the last pitch.



The sky was bluebird and the company top notch.



Smelling the barn, I sat down and enjoyed a fun Glissade down the avalanche chute. The sun came out and warmed up the top 2-3 inches. This made for perfect butt sliding. I dropped over 1,000 in just 5 minutes. Joe and Aaron played things a little more conservative and walked down. They were able to steal away a few photos.

Will I do it again? Maybe, but not anytime soon. Requisite statement for most routes in the Lost Rivers is "It would be easier if there were more ice." We didn't have enough ice to place one screw though we took 6. Gear? I wish we only took 1 set of nuts, 3 pitons, and 10 slings. If there is ice, 3 short screws would be plenty. Dinner at Pickles was perfect. I drove and slept, drove and slept till I got home at 4:30 AM.

Kevin Hansen
You don't need ice to have fun on the White Line! Mixed climbing on modern style routes shouldn't be cornered into a traditional definition where ice is part of the game.. ice is more of a bonus now-a-days! I learned this valuable lession in the Canadian Rockies where often mixed climbing is climbing rock with ice tools while wearing crampons. It opened my eyes to the possiblities in the LRR. If you get 10' total of ice (icicles/verglas)out of 5 "mixed" pitches on the more modern routes in the LRR, well then, i'd say you are in phat city! With that being said, the route does look pretty dry compared to other times i've done it! Regardless, it was techincal climbing with ice tools, crampons, winter-like conditions, and as always... some uncertainty!

This is a route even when there is "a lot" of ice that a set of stoppers and a set of cams along with some slings would be all that's needed for a rack. At most, in the fattest of conidtions, 2 stubby ice screws could be used, but likely you would be putting in an ice crew 2' away from a bommer nut or cam placement!

The sweet photo of Joe on the crux is the M3 variation. The M5 is a tight chimney and overhanging chockstone just to the left of that ramp system! The chimney is a bit harder but has better gear! Here are some photos with "average" ice condition...http://deanlords.blogspot.com/2012/05/w ... range.html

"Scratching"
"Scratch On" my friend!
Reply
Share


Confirmation of reply: