some more name that peak

some more name that peak

mark
mark

December 5th, 2010, 6:23 pm #1

I can't imagine my last photo will make it much longer, so here is another installment with added bonus of a few choices if one mountain seems too boring.


Number 1. This peak is viewed from one of Idaho's most extensive tundra/fell type areas. It was one of the most unpleasantly windy nights I've had. My tent flattened onto my face time and time again. I couldn't inspect the rock closely, but it appeared to be limestone. Views such as are what make my summer USFS work seem so awesome at times.



Number 2. This is another on the job photo taken on the way to do a hydrologic sample on a stream that had an average bankfull width of 14 meters. Lest that lead people astray, this is a fairly zoomed view. It is ten miles as the crow flies from the nearest road in any direction. Save for one nearby higher summit, it is the highest peak in a 25 mile radius. It is made of the Idaho batholith rock. A named chain of lakes sits below this aspect of the peak. The general vicinity will attract my visit in the next couple of years if I continue to live in this state.



Number 3. This mountain is an elevener. The stream that drains this view has a name having to do with sound. My coworker cemented her ski crazed reputation by hauling her telemark skis with plastic boots for thousands of feet before reaching the point where further hiking meant she was actually earning turns. She did enjoy a nice 1500 foot descent that me and my other friend glissaded. That run is just out of view to the right of what is pictured. I also backcountry ski, so I guess in this instance, I missed an opportunity to secure some July turns.



This mountain is made of metamorphosed oceanic crust derived rock. In places, it looks just like the name of some of it: greenstone. In these spectacular mountains, this rock colored green to reddish brown, looked surprisingly like granite in the overall way the bedrock looked on the landscape level. No official trail reaches the lake where this photograph was taken. The flowers on the mid July backpack here (2009) were some of the most stunning displays I have ever seen.

Enjoy



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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

December 5th, 2010, 6:43 pm #2

Looks like He Devil
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December 5th, 2010, 7:15 pm #3

Number 4 is not He Devil. I don't think that another clue is warrented just yet, so good guess.
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Sean H
Sean H

December 5th, 2010, 7:16 pm #4

I can't imagine my last photo will make it much longer, so here is another installment with added bonus of a few choices if one mountain seems too boring.


Number 1. This peak is viewed from one of Idaho's most extensive tundra/fell type areas. It was one of the most unpleasantly windy nights I've had. My tent flattened onto my face time and time again. I couldn't inspect the rock closely, but it appeared to be limestone. Views such as are what make my summer USFS work seem so awesome at times.



Number 2. This is another on the job photo taken on the way to do a hydrologic sample on a stream that had an average bankfull width of 14 meters. Lest that lead people astray, this is a fairly zoomed view. It is ten miles as the crow flies from the nearest road in any direction. Save for one nearby higher summit, it is the highest peak in a 25 mile radius. It is made of the Idaho batholith rock. A named chain of lakes sits below this aspect of the peak. The general vicinity will attract my visit in the next couple of years if I continue to live in this state.



Number 3. This mountain is an elevener. The stream that drains this view has a name having to do with sound. My coworker cemented her ski crazed reputation by hauling her telemark skis with plastic boots for thousands of feet before reaching the point where further hiking meant she was actually earning turns. She did enjoy a nice 1500 foot descent that me and my other friend glissaded. That run is just out of view to the right of what is pictured. I also backcountry ski, so I guess in this instance, I missed an opportunity to secure some July turns.



This mountain is made of metamorphosed oceanic crust derived rock. In places, it looks just like the name of some of it: greenstone. In these spectacular mountains, this rock colored green to reddish brown, looked surprisingly like granite in the overall way the bedrock looked on the landscape level. No official trail reaches the lake where this photograph was taken. The flowers on the mid July backpack here (2009) were some of the most stunning displays I have ever seen.

Enjoy


The Chinese Wall from that high alpine basin that I can't remember the name of in the Pioneers?
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December 5th, 2010, 7:17 pm #5

I can't imagine my last photo will make it much longer, so here is another installment with added bonus of a few choices if one mountain seems too boring.


Number 1. This peak is viewed from one of Idaho's most extensive tundra/fell type areas. It was one of the most unpleasantly windy nights I've had. My tent flattened onto my face time and time again. I couldn't inspect the rock closely, but it appeared to be limestone. Views such as are what make my summer USFS work seem so awesome at times.



Number 2. This is another on the job photo taken on the way to do a hydrologic sample on a stream that had an average bankfull width of 14 meters. Lest that lead people astray, this is a fairly zoomed view. It is ten miles as the crow flies from the nearest road in any direction. Save for one nearby higher summit, it is the highest peak in a 25 mile radius. It is made of the Idaho batholith rock. A named chain of lakes sits below this aspect of the peak. The general vicinity will attract my visit in the next couple of years if I continue to live in this state.



Number 3. This mountain is an elevener. The stream that drains this view has a name having to do with sound. My coworker cemented her ski crazed reputation by hauling her telemark skis with plastic boots for thousands of feet before reaching the point where further hiking meant she was actually earning turns. She did enjoy a nice 1500 foot descent that me and my other friend glissaded. That run is just out of view to the right of what is pictured. I also backcountry ski, so I guess in this instance, I missed an opportunity to secure some July turns.



This mountain is made of metamorphosed oceanic crust derived rock. In places, it looks just like the name of some of it: greenstone. In these spectacular mountains, this rock colored green to reddish brown, looked surprisingly like granite in the overall way the bedrock looked on the landscape level. No official trail reaches the lake where this photograph was taken. The flowers on the mid July backpack here (2009) were some of the most stunning displays I have ever seen.

Enjoy


Number 2 is actually slightly less than ten miles from one road I was unaware of. But it would round to ten sooner than zero.
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December 5th, 2010, 7:19 pm #6

The Chinese Wall from that high alpine basin that I can't remember the name of in the Pioneers?
This is not the Pioneer Range. But what you said first leads me to believe you might be right.
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Anonymous
Anonymous

December 5th, 2010, 7:47 pm #7

I can't imagine my last photo will make it much longer, so here is another installment with added bonus of a few choices if one mountain seems too boring.


Number 1. This peak is viewed from one of Idaho's most extensive tundra/fell type areas. It was one of the most unpleasantly windy nights I've had. My tent flattened onto my face time and time again. I couldn't inspect the rock closely, but it appeared to be limestone. Views such as are what make my summer USFS work seem so awesome at times.



Number 2. This is another on the job photo taken on the way to do a hydrologic sample on a stream that had an average bankfull width of 14 meters. Lest that lead people astray, this is a fairly zoomed view. It is ten miles as the crow flies from the nearest road in any direction. Save for one nearby higher summit, it is the highest peak in a 25 mile radius. It is made of the Idaho batholith rock. A named chain of lakes sits below this aspect of the peak. The general vicinity will attract my visit in the next couple of years if I continue to live in this state.



Number 3. This mountain is an elevener. The stream that drains this view has a name having to do with sound. My coworker cemented her ski crazed reputation by hauling her telemark skis with plastic boots for thousands of feet before reaching the point where further hiking meant she was actually earning turns. She did enjoy a nice 1500 foot descent that me and my other friend glissaded. That run is just out of view to the right of what is pictured. I also backcountry ski, so I guess in this instance, I missed an opportunity to secure some July turns.



This mountain is made of metamorphosed oceanic crust derived rock. In places, it looks just like the name of some of it: greenstone. In these spectacular mountains, this rock colored green to reddish brown, looked surprisingly like granite in the overall way the bedrock looked on the landscape level. No official trail reaches the lake where this photograph was taken. The flowers on the mid July backpack here (2009) were some of the most stunning displays I have ever seen.

Enjoy


Peak 11,458 - Boulders
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December 6th, 2010, 12:48 am #8

Good job! 11458 in the Boulders is indeed the correct location of number 3.
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

December 6th, 2010, 2:28 am #9

Mark-
What's the date on this photo?
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Dan
Dan

December 6th, 2010, 2:49 am #10

7/1/2010 - According to the "Date Picture Taken" file attribute.
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