Photography

Photography

Andrew
Andrew

July 22nd, 2012, 10:53 pm #1

Is there anyone that packs a nice DSLR with them regardless of the weight? The views that many of these peaks offer are simply breathtaking and I always want to bring back a photo that captures the feeling you get up there. Recently I've started to learn on my sister's camera and it's been quite interesting. If anyone is into this I'd appreciate any advice on lenses, technique, etc.

Also, does anyone know of a professional photographer that sells photos of mountaineering scenes?
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Eric Larsen
Eric Larsen

July 23rd, 2012, 12:05 am #2

Well I'm no expert photographer by any means, but I do often carry a DSLR with me. The best investment I've made is a "super zoom" lens with a wide focal length range, in my case a Tamron 18-270mm. It allows me to use a single lens for a wide range of applications. I also use a Nikon D40 body which is one of the lightest DSLRs out there.

If JB still lurks this group, he's an excellent photographer and could help you much more than I could. I'm pretty much a point and shooter who gets lucky every so often.

As for professionals, there are plenty. Here's a good one:

http://rogelphoto.com

A google search could find lots more.
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Wes
Wes

July 23rd, 2012, 12:10 am #3

Is there anyone that packs a nice DSLR with them regardless of the weight? The views that many of these peaks offer are simply breathtaking and I always want to bring back a photo that captures the feeling you get up there. Recently I've started to learn on my sister's camera and it's been quite interesting. If anyone is into this I'd appreciate any advice on lenses, technique, etc.

Also, does anyone know of a professional photographer that sells photos of mountaineering scenes?
I've carried a midsize DSLR body and a quiver of lenses for years but that's started to change. If you're just getting into photography, don't get too hung up on the DSLR platform. The big benefits of shooting a DSLR have always been sensor size and camera control but "3rd generation" cameras are quickly closing the gaps that separated them from the Point-and-shoot.
Shot composition is much more important than camera gear, you can shoot photos with a $20,000 rig but if the setup is weak...
My next mountain camera will have - easy to use manual controls, a large sensor, a lighter calorie count and a reasonable price tag but it definitely won't be a DSLR.

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LT
LT

July 23rd, 2012, 4:14 pm #4

Is there anyone that packs a nice DSLR with them regardless of the weight? The views that many of these peaks offer are simply breathtaking and I always want to bring back a photo that captures the feeling you get up there. Recently I've started to learn on my sister's camera and it's been quite interesting. If anyone is into this I'd appreciate any advice on lenses, technique, etc.

Also, does anyone know of a professional photographer that sells photos of mountaineering scenes?
I am by no means an expert, but I almost always carry a Nikon D80 with the Nikkor 18-200mm lens. I've hauled that combo up many mountains and numerous multi-day backpacking trips. The only time I don't bring it along is while MTBing. That lens is pricey and maybe not great optically, but it's good enough for me and the best part is you only have to carry the one lens and don't have to worry about swapping them. To me the extra weight/bulk is worth it, although I haven't owned a point-n-click camera in a few years. Maybe they have improved substantially but what bugged me the most with them is turn-on time, shutter lag, and zoom range. For landscapes... not so important, but for wildlife, action shots, or if I'm out with the kids (who don't hold still ), it's often the difference between getting a shot or not.

Costco had the D5100 with two lenses on sale for under $1000 recently. If you want a DSLR, I'd check that out. Good luck.
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 4:22 pm

July 23rd, 2012, 5:26 pm #5

Is there anyone that packs a nice DSLR with them regardless of the weight? The views that many of these peaks offer are simply breathtaking and I always want to bring back a photo that captures the feeling you get up there. Recently I've started to learn on my sister's camera and it's been quite interesting. If anyone is into this I'd appreciate any advice on lenses, technique, etc.

Also, does anyone know of a professional photographer that sells photos of mountaineering scenes?
Same here. I carry a D40 with (usually) a couple lenses and various filters. I'm not a great photographer but I really like everything you can do with them and haven't been able to go back to a point and shoot. The exception is also MTBing for me, mostly because I am sure that I will crash and crush the camera.
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Andrew
Andrew

July 26th, 2012, 5:42 pm #6

I've carried a midsize DSLR body and a quiver of lenses for years but that's started to change. If you're just getting into photography, don't get too hung up on the DSLR platform. The big benefits of shooting a DSLR have always been sensor size and camera control but "3rd generation" cameras are quickly closing the gaps that separated them from the Point-and-shoot.
Shot composition is much more important than camera gear, you can shoot photos with a $20,000 rig but if the setup is weak...
My next mountain camera will have - easy to use manual controls, a large sensor, a lighter calorie count and a reasonable price tag but it definitely won't be a DSLR.
So you are referencing the "mirrorless" cameras like Nikon's J1, Sony Nex-3/5/7, etc?

I saw on IMG's website that they recommend this style of camera for expeditions/climbs. Some photographers are saying to wait a few years until they completely surpass any advantage of the DSLR though. However, any advantage there might be may make little or no difference to a beginner like me.
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Andrew
Andrew

July 26th, 2012, 5:47 pm #7

Well I'm no expert photographer by any means, but I do often carry a DSLR with me. The best investment I've made is a "super zoom" lens with a wide focal length range, in my case a Tamron 18-270mm. It allows me to use a single lens for a wide range of applications. I also use a Nikon D40 body which is one of the lightest DSLRs out there.

If JB still lurks this group, he's an excellent photographer and could help you much more than I could. I'm pretty much a point and shooter who gets lucky every so often.

As for professionals, there are plenty. Here's a good one:

http://rogelphoto.com

A google search could find lots more.
Great link.

I'll definitely look into lenses with that range.
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Andrew
Andrew

July 26th, 2012, 6:35 pm #8

I am by no means an expert, but I almost always carry a Nikon D80 with the Nikkor 18-200mm lens. I've hauled that combo up many mountains and numerous multi-day backpacking trips. The only time I don't bring it along is while MTBing. That lens is pricey and maybe not great optically, but it's good enough for me and the best part is you only have to carry the one lens and don't have to worry about swapping them. To me the extra weight/bulk is worth it, although I haven't owned a point-n-click camera in a few years. Maybe they have improved substantially but what bugged me the most with them is turn-on time, shutter lag, and zoom range. For landscapes... not so important, but for wildlife, action shots, or if I'm out with the kids (who don't hold still ), it's often the difference between getting a shot or not.

Costco had the D5100 with two lenses on sale for under $1000 recently. If you want a DSLR, I'd check that out. Good luck.
I will be sure to check that out!
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Jeff
Jeff

July 27th, 2012, 10:01 pm #9

Is there anyone that packs a nice DSLR with them regardless of the weight? The views that many of these peaks offer are simply breathtaking and I always want to bring back a photo that captures the feeling you get up there. Recently I've started to learn on my sister's camera and it's been quite interesting. If anyone is into this I'd appreciate any advice on lenses, technique, etc.

Also, does anyone know of a professional photographer that sells photos of mountaineering scenes?
Hey Andrew, just caught your post.

Yeah, I'm a full-time adventure photographer and normally lug waaaay too much glass into the backcountry. Usually one or two camera bodies, tripod and 4-5 lenses. You can check out my website here:http://www.jacksonholegallery.com

Lots of sweet mtn. pics and yes, you can buy prints from the site if you're interested. Shoot me an email (jeff@jeffdiener.com) if you've got more questions about gear, etc.

Cheers,
-Jeff
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