Another early one

Another early one

Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

April 2nd, 2011, 12:36 am #1

A newly documented Idaho summit visited by an early nomadic hunter:

This obsidian projectile point was found on a Columbia-Great Basin Divide summit. Because it was almost fully buried in the limestone substrate, I'd hazard a guess for placement maybe 1000 years ago.
A further guess- the hunter left this poorly knapped arrowhead to mark out his territory, his version of a summit register.
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Rob R
Rob R

April 3rd, 2011, 2:07 am #2

Thanks for the info Rick! I usually only look for fossils at the top of mountains. I should start keeping an eye out for these early human tools too. Good find.
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

April 3rd, 2011, 8:00 pm #3

Thanks for your note.
I too enjoy looking for fossils, and was interested to see you learned a trick that took me a while to figure out. The best fossil hunting, in Idaho's basin ranges anyway, is usually on or near mountain summits.

Care to share what kind of fossils you've been finding?

My own area of interest centers on marine fossils found in upper Paleozoic rock. The ones I usually come across in East Central Idaho are horn coral, colony coral, brachiopod, and crinoid.

Recognize anything here?

The man on horseback is JB Umpleby, one of the pioneering USGS geologists to work in Idaho. Photo ca 1913.
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Joined: April 30th, 2009, 5:26 pm

April 6th, 2011, 4:34 am #4

I found these shells on Mt. Idaho:


And this is possibly a fossilized mollusk?


I can't even begin to guess what your fossils are of. Please enlighten me!
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Joined: April 14th, 2010, 3:52 am

April 7th, 2011, 1:36 am #5

Rob, before we start this game of 'name that fossil', keep in mind I'm the guy that mixes up swans & geese and mule deer & white tail. Here goes:

Your photo #1: a mass of shells, probably brachiopod, is called coquina.
Your photo #2: this is probably a horn coral fragment in cross section.

My Umpleby fossils, clockwise from lower left:
Foraminifers, bryozoan, various colony coral, one a favisite, and tubes (one found on the summit of 10713' Umpleby Peak), trilobite, crinoid stem in cross section (looks like a five point star), and spicule.

Just for fun, here are some more Paleozoic fossils:

From lower right, clockwise:
Coquina, streptelasma (a horn coral), gastropod (snail), 2 trilobites, Devonian bone fish, archemedes, bryozoan.

All these critters made a living in a tropical barrier reef some 350 million years ago. Now we find their skeletons 12000' above the sea. Truly, we live in a topsy turvy world.

The ca 1935 photo shows the 'Dean of Idaho Geologists' Clyde P Ross doing field work in Sawmill Canyon, Lost River Range, with White Cap Peak behind him. In geologic time, Ross was there a few seconds ago
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Joined: June 29th, 2007, 2:08 am

April 9th, 2011, 4:17 am #6

The trilobite fossils you have are better than the ones from my Geology lab. That would be really neat finding something like that.
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Bob
Bob

April 9th, 2011, 3:29 pm #7

Mt Borah has a layer of sediment that contains lots of fossils but for the life of me I can't remember where we were at the time when we found them. We found them on several trips but only in certain layers of the limestone and on specific aspects of the mountain. I have an aversion to putting rocks in my pack when I'm climbing and I won't chip just to get a cheap souvenir so I never brought any back with me.


bob
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Dave
Dave

April 9th, 2011, 5:23 pm #8

I found these shells on Mt. Idaho:


And this is possibly a fossilized mollusk?


I can't even begin to guess what your fossils are of. Please enlighten me!
Here's a photo taken in the Lost River Range of a bunch of fossils we found. For scale, the one on the right is about 8 inches long.

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