An interesting question

An interesting question

Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

April 12th, 2010, 1:37 am #1

So yesterday Rob and I were hiking up Cervidae and we came up with an interesting question. Here in the Northern Hemisphere we all know that the North faces and slopes of peaks are often the most glaciated and retain the most snow throughout the year. We were wondering if in the Southern Hemisphere the opposite were true, that South faces and slopes would be more glaciated and snowy? Anybody have the answer?
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Sean
Sean

April 12th, 2010, 2:35 am #2

That is an interesting question and I believe that the opposite is true in the southern hemisphere. The sun appears to travel in the southern portion of the sky during a northern hemisphere winter and the opposite in the southern hemisphere. My first hand on Aconcagua involved climbing far north up a valley, then turning back and ascending the north slopes to summit. The south slopes were snowier.
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

April 12th, 2010, 2:42 am #3

It seemed like that would be the case since the equator is to the North where the sun would face the majority of the time. So then that would mean that south faces there would be more precipitous like many north faces are here right? That's pretty fascinating.
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mlsl
mlsl

April 12th, 2010, 3:58 am #4

just like the toilet swirling thing...opposite...interesting. So likewise, moss would grow on the south side o stuff too?
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Pete
Pete

April 12th, 2010, 4:18 am #5

Moss grows on the south side of a lot of things
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Sean
Sean

April 12th, 2010, 4:26 am #6

It seemed like that would be the case since the equator is to the North where the sun would face the majority of the time. So then that would mean that south faces there would be more precipitous like many north faces are here right? That's pretty fascinating.
My guess would be that south faces in the southern hemisphere would be more precipitous in the winter, but not necessarily in the summer (like here). Throw in different weather patterns, mountain ranges, topography, proximity to the ocean and I think you have highly variable precip totals.
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Joined: January 15th, 2008, 6:19 am

April 12th, 2010, 4:35 am #7

Sorry if I wasn't clear. I meant "precipitous" and in sharp, vertical, and dramatic, not "precipitation".
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Sean
Sean

April 12th, 2010, 5:12 am #8

I think it would depend almost entirely on the historical glaciation patterns and volcanism in the areas. I believe those two factors are the major contributors to whether a slope is steep or not in any area.
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Joined: April 1st, 2008, 9:56 pm

April 12th, 2010, 5:32 am #9

Moss grows on the south side of a lot of things
Does the mossy stone roll up hill down south?
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crappyclimber
crappyclimber

April 12th, 2010, 10:04 pm #10

That is an interesting question and I believe that the opposite is true in the southern hemisphere. The sun appears to travel in the southern portion of the sky during a northern hemisphere winter and the opposite in the southern hemisphere. My first hand on Aconcagua involved climbing far north up a valley, then turning back and ascending the north slopes to summit. The south slopes were snowier.
Having climbed many peaks in the southern hemisphere (New Zealand), it is true about the South faces being equivilent to our North faces of mountains. It really throws your sense of direction out of whack for a couple of weeks until your mind adjusts too.
I really think that we should take an education trip to climb for a season in the southern hemisphere to really prove the theory though.....anyone else on board?
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