Am I crazy?

Am I crazy?

Joined: October 25th, 2008, 1:51 am

October 25th, 2008, 2:28 am #1

I am fast approaching 40 and am starting to feel my own mortality. Since I don't have the financial ability to buy a Porsche or run off to Australia, I have been thinking about trying to summit all of the 12ers in Idaho in the next 60 months.

I actually got this idea while working through a couple of pitchers of microbrews with friend who is well on his way to summiting all of the 12ers (6 of 9). He says that with a little work and commitment it would be no problem for me. However, this is the same guy who once talked me into taking "a little float trip" down the Jarbidge river after I had completed an 8 week kayaking course. Needless to say, I am now much more wary of any estimation he gives of my skills and abilities.

Here is what I do know. I am in reasonably good shape. I run/walk 10-12 miles a week and bike 20-50, and have no known physical ailments (at least according the physical I had to take for the latest insurance policy my wife took out on me). I do have some bouldering and scrambling experience, but no technical climbing experience.

I am interested in hearing from anyone in this forum about what they think it would take to summit all of the 12ers. Especially any suggestions on which one(s) to start with; what skills are needed; and/or if I am out of my head.
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Joined: June 9th, 2003, 11:50 pm

October 25th, 2008, 4:03 am #2

Your not crazy !!!I think it is a great idea but what does it have to do with turning 40? It sounds like you are in great shape and have a desire to do this and love the outdoors. I would suggest starting on something smaller. I don’t know where you live but find some smaller notable mountains to climb. Some people get discouraged after the first 12 er because the didn’t expect it to be so hard. Find someone that has been there before.( this is a great place to find partners) and tackle one of the 9. First purchase a Orange Bible ,IDAHO a climbers guide then I would start with Hyndman peak. I think it is the easiest. Try to keep your climbing trips no longer than 2 weeks apart. You will be amazed how this helps build conditioning. Hang around the cliffs and learn from others. Practice, Practice, Practice, Being comfortable on the rock really helps with dealing with the exposure in the mountains.

Beginners are many but enders are few.
Stick to the task until it sticks to you.

Bind at it, stretch at it,, Smile at it to.
For after the binds the stretch and smiles,
Will come life’s victory after a while.
Stick to the task until it sticks to you.

Honor power praise and glory,
Comes in time to those that stay.
Stick to the task until it sticks to you.

Have fun, Be safe, hope to see you in the mountains. Teton
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Joined: August 15th, 2007, 5:39 am

October 25th, 2008, 10:13 am #3

I am fast approaching 40 and am starting to feel my own mortality. Since I don't have the financial ability to buy a Porsche or run off to Australia, I have been thinking about trying to summit all of the 12ers in Idaho in the next 60 months.

I actually got this idea while working through a couple of pitchers of microbrews with friend who is well on his way to summiting all of the 12ers (6 of 9). He says that with a little work and commitment it would be no problem for me. However, this is the same guy who once talked me into taking "a little float trip" down the Jarbidge river after I had completed an 8 week kayaking course. Needless to say, I am now much more wary of any estimation he gives of my skills and abilities.

Here is what I do know. I am in reasonably good shape. I run/walk 10-12 miles a week and bike 20-50, and have no known physical ailments (at least according the physical I had to take for the latest insurance policy my wife took out on me). I do have some bouldering and scrambling experience, but no technical climbing experience.

I am interested in hearing from anyone in this forum about what they think it would take to summit all of the 12ers. Especially any suggestions on which one(s) to start with; what skills are needed; and/or if I am out of my head.
Two and a half years ago I looked in the mirror and admitted to myself that I was not in the shape I wanted to be in as my 30th birthday rolled around, which was about 6 months from that time. I decided to set a goal to climb Borah before my 30th. I hooked up with a buddy that has done quite a bit of climbing and he agreed to show me the ropes and accompany me on my quest.
We did some smaller stuff around the Pocatello area so that I could prove to him that I could actually take care of myself in the hills. I also got serious about a diet and some exercise.
The one stipulation my buddy put on the Borah hike was that we did Diamond first, and I'm so glad we did. It was a fun hike that gave me the right mixture of grunt and spooky. His reasoning with the Diamond hike first was that so many people go trudge up Borah just so they can say they've done it and in the process they push themselves so hard they burn out and never return to another big peak.
Well, on the Diamond hike I set the goal of climbing all the 12ers. Because of work and a young family I don't have the time to bang em all out through the course of a summer so I decided to just do one or two a year until I get them all done. This year I got Leatherman. Next year will be something else.
This goal has changed my life. Get after it and it will change yours as well. I've still got six left and you'd be more than welcome to come along.
TEWFAT
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

October 25th, 2008, 11:46 am #4

I am fast approaching 40 and am starting to feel my own mortality. Since I don't have the financial ability to buy a Porsche or run off to Australia, I have been thinking about trying to summit all of the 12ers in Idaho in the next 60 months.

I actually got this idea while working through a couple of pitchers of microbrews with friend who is well on his way to summiting all of the 12ers (6 of 9). He says that with a little work and commitment it would be no problem for me. However, this is the same guy who once talked me into taking "a little float trip" down the Jarbidge river after I had completed an 8 week kayaking course. Needless to say, I am now much more wary of any estimation he gives of my skills and abilities.

Here is what I do know. I am in reasonably good shape. I run/walk 10-12 miles a week and bike 20-50, and have no known physical ailments (at least according the physical I had to take for the latest insurance policy my wife took out on me). I do have some bouldering and scrambling experience, but no technical climbing experience.

I am interested in hearing from anyone in this forum about what they think it would take to summit all of the 12ers. Especially any suggestions on which one(s) to start with; what skills are needed; and/or if I am out of my head.
40? You're just a kid!
Get out there- it's about the best mid-life crisis you could have. Even if your "mid-life" isn't really for another decade.
Here's my dad nearing the top of Hyndman at 72.
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Judi S
Judi S

October 27th, 2008, 5:40 pm #5

I am fast approaching 40 and am starting to feel my own mortality. Since I don't have the financial ability to buy a Porsche or run off to Australia, I have been thinking about trying to summit all of the 12ers in Idaho in the next 60 months.

I actually got this idea while working through a couple of pitchers of microbrews with friend who is well on his way to summiting all of the 12ers (6 of 9). He says that with a little work and commitment it would be no problem for me. However, this is the same guy who once talked me into taking "a little float trip" down the Jarbidge river after I had completed an 8 week kayaking course. Needless to say, I am now much more wary of any estimation he gives of my skills and abilities.

Here is what I do know. I am in reasonably good shape. I run/walk 10-12 miles a week and bike 20-50, and have no known physical ailments (at least according the physical I had to take for the latest insurance policy my wife took out on me). I do have some bouldering and scrambling experience, but no technical climbing experience.

I am interested in hearing from anyone in this forum about what they think it would take to summit all of the 12ers. Especially any suggestions on which one(s) to start with; what skills are needed; and/or if I am out of my head.
My husband and I were just a couple months shy of 40 when we moved to Boise. We hiked the 12ers (interspersed with many other peaks) over the next 6 years and we are still hiking peaks. We stay in aerobic shape by bike commuting, and we go on trips as often as our schedule permits.

In addition to the orange Bible, you will want topographic maps, compass, etc. and experience route finding to keep the climbs at the level you are comfortable with - all have routes no harder than Yosemite Decimal System Class 3 (real climbing/scrambling requiring the use of hands but no significant exposure). The best way to get experience is to go with others with experience; we lead peak bagging trips posted at www.idahomoutainrec.org .
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Joined: April 14th, 2005, 2:42 am

October 27th, 2008, 6:25 pm #6

Judi's suggestion is a good one, but the URL doesn't work for me.
Try this (no WWW):
http://idahomountainrec.org/


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Joined: October 3rd, 2006, 6:10 pm

October 28th, 2008, 11:17 pm #7

Wow I wish I had talent to build and maintain that kind of a web site! What a great asset to the climbing folks of the Boise area.

In response to the "AM I CRAZY' thread. Yes you are. Quit now! Give up! Stay on that expensive couch. Why did you buy your nice leather furniture if you're planning on spending all you free time in the mountains? Sounds like a waste of money to me.
Don't get motivated to aspire to new heights, see new things. It takes time, money, effort, and work! What, are you looking for a second job that sucks your money away instead of pays? If you are, you should take up restoreing old Volkswagens! Believe me I have 3!
Trust me; you don't want to get into mountaineering. Try something safe like race car driving or even mushroom picking. Or something less financially risky like farming. Let’s face it have you ever heard of a farmer say "I regret getting into farming?" yea me neither.
Take my advice stay away from the mountains; they will only bring you blisters, soreness, aches, and pains. Instead you should look for something that is easier on the body like a stationary machine. That way you don't expose your body to any sudden shocks. Besides think of all the people you could meet at the local gym! I bet you they work out.? If you were out in the mountains, you'd miss out on meeting new friends and conversations with people who look like they work out. Who are you going to make friends with to out there? A squirrel? A rock? A tree? What kind of a friend would a tree make? "Hello Mr. Squirrel do you work out?" I mean really..
Yep, the best thing is to only look at mountains from your windshield. It’s the new rage! Last year 4,413,668 people visited Grand Canyon NP and a whapping 3% of them used the trail system. The other 97% were parked at the rim looking down laughing and pointing at those dumb backpackers. If GOD wanted us to carry heavy loads on our backs He wouldn't have invented cars, or those neat suitcases with wheels! You don't want to be laughed at. It makes you feel sad.
I think it’s good that you came to a mountaineering message board for advice on whether or not to get into this kind of a sport or life style. It shows that you are a smart person. Do the smart thing and stay away from the mountains. Or even the foot hills for that matter.
Kevin
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Joined: December 20th, 2007, 3:45 pm

October 29th, 2008, 4:16 am #8

with Kevin. Just this Saturday I was forced to battle a terrible headwind in my Westy on the way home from the City. That just topped off the three days spent climbing there. We hardly ate at all and when we did, it was bagels and soup. We slept in a van filled with a mix of odors of armpits, farts, and coffee (my wife says that the armpits and farts were mine). We woke up at sunrise and climbed until it was almost dark. I even missed two days of work to do this!

I think that the worst thing that you could do is to find partners to go with and meet new people that climb. Then they will hassle you about the climbs that they want to take you on and then you will be less productive at work because you will be reading TRs online and installing TOPO! on your workstation computer. Eventually, you may even start calling in sick when you're not!
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Anonymous
Anonymous

October 29th, 2008, 11:26 pm #9

Wow I wish I had talent to build and maintain that kind of a web site! What a great asset to the climbing folks of the Boise area.

In response to the "AM I CRAZY' thread. Yes you are. Quit now! Give up! Stay on that expensive couch. Why did you buy your nice leather furniture if you're planning on spending all you free time in the mountains? Sounds like a waste of money to me.
Don't get motivated to aspire to new heights, see new things. It takes time, money, effort, and work! What, are you looking for a second job that sucks your money away instead of pays? If you are, you should take up restoreing old Volkswagens! Believe me I have 3!
Trust me; you don't want to get into mountaineering. Try something safe like race car driving or even mushroom picking. Or something less financially risky like farming. Let’s face it have you ever heard of a farmer say "I regret getting into farming?" yea me neither.
Take my advice stay away from the mountains; they will only bring you blisters, soreness, aches, and pains. Instead you should look for something that is easier on the body like a stationary machine. That way you don't expose your body to any sudden shocks. Besides think of all the people you could meet at the local gym! I bet you they work out.? If you were out in the mountains, you'd miss out on meeting new friends and conversations with people who look like they work out. Who are you going to make friends with to out there? A squirrel? A rock? A tree? What kind of a friend would a tree make? "Hello Mr. Squirrel do you work out?" I mean really..
Yep, the best thing is to only look at mountains from your windshield. It’s the new rage! Last year 4,413,668 people visited Grand Canyon NP and a whapping 3% of them used the trail system. The other 97% were parked at the rim looking down laughing and pointing at those dumb backpackers. If GOD wanted us to carry heavy loads on our backs He wouldn't have invented cars, or those neat suitcases with wheels! You don't want to be laughed at. It makes you feel sad.
I think it’s good that you came to a mountaineering message board for advice on whether or not to get into this kind of a sport or life style. It shows that you are a smart person. Do the smart thing and stay away from the mountains. Or even the foot hills for that matter.
Kevin
I needed it.
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Joined: October 25th, 2008, 1:51 am

October 30th, 2008, 12:57 am #10

Wow I wish I had talent to build and maintain that kind of a web site! What a great asset to the climbing folks of the Boise area.

In response to the "AM I CRAZY' thread. Yes you are. Quit now! Give up! Stay on that expensive couch. Why did you buy your nice leather furniture if you're planning on spending all you free time in the mountains? Sounds like a waste of money to me.
Don't get motivated to aspire to new heights, see new things. It takes time, money, effort, and work! What, are you looking for a second job that sucks your money away instead of pays? If you are, you should take up restoreing old Volkswagens! Believe me I have 3!
Trust me; you don't want to get into mountaineering. Try something safe like race car driving or even mushroom picking. Or something less financially risky like farming. Let’s face it have you ever heard of a farmer say "I regret getting into farming?" yea me neither.
Take my advice stay away from the mountains; they will only bring you blisters, soreness, aches, and pains. Instead you should look for something that is easier on the body like a stationary machine. That way you don't expose your body to any sudden shocks. Besides think of all the people you could meet at the local gym! I bet you they work out.? If you were out in the mountains, you'd miss out on meeting new friends and conversations with people who look like they work out. Who are you going to make friends with to out there? A squirrel? A rock? A tree? What kind of a friend would a tree make? "Hello Mr. Squirrel do you work out?" I mean really..
Yep, the best thing is to only look at mountains from your windshield. It’s the new rage! Last year 4,413,668 people visited Grand Canyon NP and a whapping 3% of them used the trail system. The other 97% were parked at the rim looking down laughing and pointing at those dumb backpackers. If GOD wanted us to carry heavy loads on our backs He wouldn't have invented cars, or those neat suitcases with wheels! You don't want to be laughed at. It makes you feel sad.
I think it’s good that you came to a mountaineering message board for advice on whether or not to get into this kind of a sport or life style. It shows that you are a smart person. Do the smart thing and stay away from the mountains. Or even the foot hills for that matter.
Kevin
What is this? Sarcasm!?!? I thought that was banished from the realm of corporate right-think long ago. I am pleasantly surprised that there are people like Kevin who are still allowed to run around unmedicated and/or restrained. Please tell me, is free thinking and open debating still practiced? Is this representative of the climbing community? Can I expect to find more specimens like Kevin above 11,000 ft? Most people I meet develop their opinions from the pablum and inane sound bites they recive from the nightly news, or what ever they picked up from the most recent reality TV show.

Please someone, anyone, let me know if this is what I can expect! For if it is I will be above the 11,000 ft mark within the next 6 mos.
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