KM - Back pain, injections

KM - Back pain, injections

Joined: January 27th, 2003, 11:09 pm

May 17th, 2012, 4:46 pm #1

KM,

You ended up canceling, didn't you? I wanted to let you know that I'm scheduled for injections on May 25th. It's supposed to be injections of lydacane (sp?) followed by injections of cortisone, and it's given with x-ray guidance. (My problems are at L4 and L5 and one of my SI joints is fused). I was instructed that someone has to drive me. I am nervous, but I feel like I don't really have anything to lose. The neurosurgeon doesn't want to do surgery. He said I should try this first (the recovery from surgery, he says, will feel like I've been hit by a bus for six weeks). I will let you know how it goes if you like.

xoxoxo
MM
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 17th, 2012, 6:23 pm #2

I did have dh drive me, but I would have been ok. It was just an abundance of caution.

The initial injection was ok. First there was numbing spray. Then a small sting. The part that hurt was when he pushed in the steroid. I'd already had that same shot 2x in my foot, so I knew roughly what to expect in my back. This was L3-L4. I might have to have L5 done, too.

I didn't feel relief at first, but today I do notice improvement.

Tell you what the podiatrist did that the back dr didn't do: she kept yacking during the shot, and it did help distract me. I guess the dr felt he had to focus, so maybe you could take your ipod in and play some tunes? I'll try to remember to do that next time if I do this again.

(It would be interesting to do a music therapy study to see what kind of music is best for this procedure. Since the chatty podiatrist wasn't exactly soothing, my guess is that something pretty energetic is more distracting than something more calm.)




Keiki's Makuahine (Keiki's Mom) 51, dh 52
Keiki: b. 2002 after 3 months bedrest
Natural conception following ZIFT/chem. pg

Olivia: b. 1999 d. 1999
28-week preemie, ptl cause unknown
Natural conception after 1 mc

ttc since 1998
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Joined: January 27th, 2003, 11:09 pm

May 17th, 2012, 7:16 pm #3

I will bring my ipod with me. I'm glad you are feeling some improvement. I think the doctor said that it usually took a couple of days to kick in.

This was my first experience going to a pain clinic, and it was, well interesting. After filling out lots of forms including one that included questions like, "Have you ever been threatened, slapped, hit or kicked?" (!!!?) a woman asked me what I was taking for the pain. When I told them I wasn't currently taking anything, she handed me a cup and told me to pee in it! I was a bit shocked that they were testing me for drugs, when I wasn't even asking for any, but they were like, "Well, this is a pain clinic." I guess they have to be cautious.

xoxoxoox
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cy2
Joined: February 16th, 2006, 6:45 pm

May 17th, 2012, 9:41 pm #4

KM,

You ended up canceling, didn't you? I wanted to let you know that I'm scheduled for injections on May 25th. It's supposed to be injections of lydacane (sp?) followed by injections of cortisone, and it's given with x-ray guidance. (My problems are at L4 and L5 and one of my SI joints is fused). I was instructed that someone has to drive me. I am nervous, but I feel like I don't really have anything to lose. The neurosurgeon doesn't want to do surgery. He said I should try this first (the recovery from surgery, he says, will feel like I've been hit by a bus for six weeks). I will let you know how it goes if you like.

xoxoxo
MM
Usually my rheumatologist topically numbs with that freezing spray. Then when the skin is white he injects a mixture of lidocaine and cortisone. The area usually hurts like H&%$!! until the lidocaine kicks in. By the next morning I usually feel relief and the swelling is decreasing.

My only warning is to try not to overdo things when you feel better. I made that mistake once (went out and played golf while it was still numb after my shot) and that shot didn't last very long. Other times, I've "babied" the joint that was injected and sometimes the pain/swelling didn't come back at all. Other times the relief lasted a year.

I know it's probably a lot more complicated to inject the spinal column instead of a knuckle, but the cortisone is magical. (without the side effects of the oral type!)

Good luck!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 18th, 2012, 1:18 am #5

I'm not supposed to do strengthening exercises for a couple of weeks, although I do move and flex gently. He told me no breast stroke for a while.

My injections were not in the spinal cord.

Thanks for your valuable info!




Keiki's Makuahine (Keiki's Mom) 51, dh 52
Keiki: b. 2002 after 3 months bedrest
Natural conception following ZIFT/chem. pg

Olivia: b. 1999 d. 1999
28-week preemie, ptl cause unknown
Natural conception after 1 mc

ttc since 1998
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Joined: January 27th, 2003, 11:09 pm

May 18th, 2012, 12:40 pm #6

Usually my rheumatologist topically numbs with that freezing spray. Then when the skin is white he injects a mixture of lidocaine and cortisone. The area usually hurts like H&%$!! until the lidocaine kicks in. By the next morning I usually feel relief and the swelling is decreasing.

My only warning is to try not to overdo things when you feel better. I made that mistake once (went out and played golf while it was still numb after my shot) and that shot didn't last very long. Other times, I've "babied" the joint that was injected and sometimes the pain/swelling didn't come back at all. Other times the relief lasted a year.

I know it's probably a lot more complicated to inject the spinal column instead of a knuckle, but the cortisone is magical. (without the side effects of the oral type!)

Good luck!
They didn't say anything about taking it easy. I hope they don't tell me no strengthening exercises! I can wait a few more weeks to do all of the many things I haven't been able to do comfortably for a long time now, but if I have to refrain from my usual routines I'm going to be bumming.

Now I'm getting really scared about how painful the procedure will be, but I've got to do it. I figure I can endure anything, knowing it will end. It's the pain with no end in sight that wears me down.

xoxoxo
MM
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Joined: January 27th, 2003, 11:09 pm

May 18th, 2012, 12:40 pm #7

Usually my rheumatologist topically numbs with that freezing spray. Then when the skin is white he injects a mixture of lidocaine and cortisone. The area usually hurts like H&%$!! until the lidocaine kicks in. By the next morning I usually feel relief and the swelling is decreasing.

My only warning is to try not to overdo things when you feel better. I made that mistake once (went out and played golf while it was still numb after my shot) and that shot didn't last very long. Other times, I've "babied" the joint that was injected and sometimes the pain/swelling didn't come back at all. Other times the relief lasted a year.

I know it's probably a lot more complicated to inject the spinal column instead of a knuckle, but the cortisone is magical. (without the side effects of the oral type!)

Good luck!
nt
Last edited by MM-IL on May 18th, 2012, 12:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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