Taped interview with witness that called Patterson...

Taped interview with witness that called Patterson...

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2009, 5:03 pm #1

You may have to click the arrow on the bottom left hand side for this to play...

<embed width="600" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" src="http://static.photobucket.com/player.sw ... terson.flv">
Last edited by tiny on October 9th, 2009, 9:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Monster Hunter
Monster Hunter

October 9th, 2009, 5:09 pm #2


Begins pg 74, Greens second trip down:
The first morning after I got home I was awakened by a phone call from Bud Ryerson, who had just driven out to Blue Creek Mountain where his crew was working and had found fresh tracks running for hundreds of yards in the loose dust on the new road. He was calling on the radio phone, which half of northern California could hear, and all he said was that what I was looking for was there. I knew what he meant and it turned out that a lot of other people did too. I got on the phone trying to round up scientists, a tracking dog and money to charter a plane. The Vancouver Sun came through with $500 the only time anything like that has ever happened to me and Rene and I got away early in the afternoon with Dale Moffit and White Lady but no scientists. In the meantime I had made a phone call to Al Hodgson, who I met only briefly a couple of days before and asked him to have someone meet us at the Orleans airstrip with transportation, food and American money.

Landing at Orleans was interesting. The airstrip runs at right angles to the valley, which is rather narrow and the pilot shouted in my ear that he would have to side slip to get low enough to touch down. Side slipping turned out to involve a sharp drop to one side and then to the other, like a falling leaf. Knowing that it was going to happen, I found it interesting if slightly disconcerting. Not knowing it was going to happen, Rene and Dale got a lot more out of it than that.

At Orleans we found waiting for us a school teacher cum bear hunter, S.C. Buttram with a jeep, a stock of groceries and $100.00 cash. There arent too many people who would come through in a pinch like that for a new acquaintance and we said a silent thank you to Al Hodgson. Syl McCoy had meanwhile been sent to some other part of the country to fight a fire. We drove immediately to meet Bud Ryerson but by the time we got to where the tracks were it was already night. At the first sniff the dog turned ad rigid as if she had been given an electric shock, but no one cared to try following the tracks off into the woods in the dark. At dawn the dogs reaction was entirely different. Exhibiting no sign of excitement, she puttered around sniffing the leaves of little bushes at the edge of an old jeep road where the larger of the two creatures had apparently gone. The ground there was too hard to show anything and Dale told us that underneath the leaves was the last place where a trace of scent would hang. Lady went a few hundred yards down the road but showed no sign of having anything definite to follow.

The main purpose of the trip having failed, there were a lot more things we could have done and we picked away at them, but not very efficiently. The evening before Dale had found that he had left the dogs tracking harness in the plane. I had some pone calls to make anyway, so Rene and I drove back to Orleans. The pilot having found nothing to pass the time in the tiny town, elected to come back with us and we stopped to show him the old tracks on Onion Mountain.

I dont remember what he said on first seeing those giant tracks outlined by flashlight with black woods all around us, but he said plenty after Rene let out a scream just behind him. The next time we stopped there we found new tracks, only 12 inches long but with an enormous stride and sinking in far deeper than our own tracks. I thought they might have been made by some barefoot person taking high leaping strides and tried to duplicate them that way, but sharp little stones in the gravel put an immediate end to the experiment. Whether the scream had anything to do with the new tracks appearing, I dont know. Since then a hearty scream just before hitting the sack has been tried many times in hopes of attracting visitors in the night, but without results. I dont know what the sasquatches think of it, but it gets interesting results with people.

After the letdown when the dog wouldnt track, Rene and I started feeling the effects of lack of sleep, especially when the heat passed 100 in the shade. We didnt exactly waste the rest of the day but I have wished ever since that we had been more painstaking and systematic in examining and recording the tracks. There were an awful lot of them, covering two sections of road totaling about 600 yards right at the peak of Blue Creek Mountain, which is the high point of a fairly level ridge just under 5,000 feet in elevation.
Bud Ryerson said that when he first saw the tracks there were plainly two small sets and one large one. During the day before, we arrived traffic on the road had wiped out the tracks on about a quarter of the road surface and we could no longer find a place where there was a double set of small tracks.

Two creatures had come up on the road at the same point out of the valley of Pecwan Creek, west of Bluff Creek and had wandered north. They had not walked side by side and were not necessarily together at all. At some points one set of the other would go off the side of the road onto hard-packed ground, then return after a while. Once the larger creature apparently did a loop off the road and came back on it father back than where he left it, making a double set of big tracks. The smaller tracks finally left the road on the east side, a considerable distance before the point where the larger tracks went off to the same side down the old jeep road.

Just after they first came on the road, the large tracks went over to where the men had left some small tractor parts in a box and those were scattered out on the road which was what had first drawn Bud Ryersons attention to the tracks. Deep dust stirred up by the road equipment was the only material the tracks would show in and it was so soft that human tracks would sink in it to almost equal depth. There had been a sprinkle of big drops of rain that evening however and all the tracks were literally cast in a delicate skin of dried mud. Some of them would have shown perfect detail but traffic had filled them with a layer of dust and they were so fragile that there was no way to remove the dust without damaging the tracks. Perhaps half of them had been wiped out in the wheel ruts, yet there were still 590 tracks left.

We took a lot of pictures and made some casts but we did not cast the best tracks because we had work that the British Columbia Museum was sending an anthropologist to see them. It took him two days to arrive and despite the co-operation of Bud Ryerson in trying to preserve the tracks even at the cost of interfering with his road projecttraffic and curious visitors were constantly wiping out some and putting more dust in others. In the meantime, we heard that similar sizes of tracks had been reported made the same night down in the bed of Bluff Creek several miles to the northwest. They were on a sandbar where some loggers had a trailer camp but the night they were made, the loggers were all away for the weekend. When they got back and found the tracks they moved the trailers away, destroying most of the tracks in the process. There were a few left, however, and they were definitely made by the same individuals. Even the smaller track sank an inch deep in the damp sand, where we did not sink in at all.

When Don Abbot arrived from the provincial museum, he chose to try to lift a track out of the ground by impregnating it with glue. It proved difficult to soak the glue in without eroding the track and then the glue showed no sign of wanted to set, so we left it overnight. The next day Don persuaded some zoologists from Humboldt State University to come and look at the tracks but waiting for them proved a fatal mistake. Before we got back the road crew had decided we were finished with the tracks and they had graded the road, wiping out almost all of them including those we had tried to solidify with glue. Not only had we made only a few casts of second rate tracks, we had promised casts to a number of people who had come up to make their own, persuading them to wait until the scientists had been there. As a result we didnt have much left for ourselves. The museum does have one good cast showing one track of each size in a single piece of plaster but things being as they are between museums and sasquatches, they dont display it. Dr. Clifford Carl, the director of the B.C. Museum was almost solely responsible for the interest they did show and his death not long afterwards pretty well put an end to it. Don Abbott was entirely convinced when he was looking at them that the tracks were those of an unknown primate. He is a cultural anthropologist, however and he was not able to convince the zoologists.

The Blue Creek Mountain tracks eliminated one of the possible ways that it seemed tracks might be manufactured by humans. Even though many tracks gave every appearance of having been made by pressure even to the point of making cracks in the ground around them, we had wondered if an extremely skillful person could dig and shape the tracks, removing the material instead of compressing it. The tiny layer of mud on the dust at Blue Creek Mountain ruled that out. It had sprinkled early in the evening and in such hot weather the dampness could hardly have lasted more than an hour or so. There was no dew at all the following night. To have shaped a thousand tracks by hand in that brief period and in the dark would be impossible many times over. It did not appear that they could have been made with false feet either, since they showed evidence of flexibility and muscular control including one 15 track that appeared to have as shap an outline as the others, yet was narrower and showed only four toes.

It probably will never be possible to rule out entirely the possibility that tracks are faked. There have been a lot of attempts to imitate them and some have fooled people for a time. There are almost certainly other fakes that have not been detected. To go from that to faking all the tracks however, is a colossal step. Tracks have been reported for centuries and from all over North America as well as other parts of the world. In the years before the subject was widely publicized there would probably have had to be some kind of continuing undercover organization to have achieved those results. It is not reasonable to argue that such an effort could go on without anyone ever being caught in the act of coming forward to brag of his exploits. In the height of the Bigfoot excitement a television program offered a reward of $1000.00 for anyone who could show how to make the tracks. That was a more impressive sum of money then, than it is now and all sorts of people applied but no one collected. It would also be unreasonable that there should be an animal making the tracks without ever being caught in the act, but that is not the cast. Many hundreds of people have reported seeing just such an animal and one had been photographed in the act of making a fine set of tracks. The problem is to produce the animal in the flesh.

People still cling to the idea that bears made the tracks and certainly they are the only possible candidate among North American animals but the differences a re specific and unmistakable. A bear has long claw marks. A bears hind foot is wider than a Sasquatch track in proportion to its length and more pointed in the heel. Its front foot has a totally different shape with the sole far wider than it is long. A bears toes are fairly uniform in size. The one extending farthest forward is the middle one and the outside one is well forward of the inside one. Only two of the many five toed Sasquatch tracks I am familiar with have toes of uniform size. All the others have a big toe on the inside of the foot. In every track I know of but one, the longest toe is the inside toe. There is one exception that has toes all the same size with the middle one farthest forward but even it doesnt look anything like a bear track. The middle toe is farthest forward because the others stick out toward the sides. You can get the approximate shape of a Sasquatch track where a bears hind foot has stepped ahead of his front foot with the hind heel obliterating some of the front toe imprints. I doesnt cover them all because it isnt wide enough and the back of a bears front print is concave, bearing no resemblance to a sasquatch heel.

There is one thing really strange about the Bigfoot situation at Bluff Creek, and that is the fact that so many tracks showed up in the one locality. Tracks are generally seen so seldom that one has to assume that if these creatures are real they must be in the habit of avoiding places where their tracks will show. For one individual to get careless about this would perhaps be understandable, but in Bluff Creek two different individuals started doing it almost at the same time and several others have made contributions on a less frequent scale. I used to think that the explanation was the kind of soil in the Bluff Creek valley combined with the weather conditions there that there was so little gravel available and so much dry weather that it was not worth while to gravel the logging roads, so that they would always be either dusty or muddy and would show a track. There is some truth in that compared to the situation in coastal British Columbia where logging roads are always heavily graveled but the conditions in Bluff Creek are not as different as I once thought and certainly not so unique as to account for so many more tracks being found there than anywhere else. Besides a lot of the tracks were in the creekbed. There is a partial explanation in the fact that many more man hours have been spent looking for tracks in the Bluff Creek area than anywhere else, perhaps more than everywhere else put together. But in 1958 1963 and 64 nobody had to look for the tracks, there were showing up all over.

Why did they do it then and why have they stopped since. There are some possible explanations. The new road may have entered an area where Bigfoot had always been carelessly leaving his tracks around. He may indeed have died or moved elsewhere, after 1964 and the maker of the 15 tracks may be departed since 1967. Perhaps there are just so many Bigfoot hunters roaming those hills now that the sasquatches have left or learned caution. Whatever the truth about him may be, Bigfoot at Bluff Creek certainly left his mark on North America. Ends pg 82.
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DonDon
DonDon

October 9th, 2009, 6:37 pm #3

You may have to click the arrow on the bottom left hand side for this to play...

<embed width="600" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" src="http://static.photobucket.com/player.sw ... terson.flv">
that outta tighten up some buttcheeks on a few people wonfering what else that witness said to the interviewer. Things that make you go hummmmmmm.
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Bobbie Short
Bobbie Short

October 9th, 2009, 7:47 pm #4

You may have to click the arrow on the bottom left hand side for this to play...

<embed width="600" height="361" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" wmode="transparent" src="http://static.photobucket.com/player.sw ... terson.flv">
I believe that phone conversation between Al Hodgson & Roger Patterson occurred on Monday of that week. (Green's "Apes Among Us" 1978 Chaper 4 Bigfoot at Bluff Creek) Hodgson is also on tape placing his son and Bob Titmus meeting John & Rene's chartered plane at the Orleans airport. Or as Rene called him... "dat bugger, Titmouse."

Patterson had plenty time to drive down to Bluff Creek because Rene, John and Titmus waited for Don Abbott to arrived from BC until Thursday. They were all there. John, Rene, Titmus, Dale, the dog, Roger and Bob until at least until the end of the week; explaining Roger's lack of beard in one photo (arrival) and his substantial beard, same clothes in another on his departure.

Once Bill Miller verifies the date the pilot filed the flight plan; when he left BC & when he flew the chartered plan out of Orleans & back to BC., he'll come to understand the full picture.

At the same time, the pilot's license will have his mug shot on it, proving he looks nothing like Bob Titmus as John insists...

Fwiw, and this is just my own observations, I think the Patterson film was shot during John's second trip down via the chartered plane and not in October. I presume (if we believe the testimony of Sheriff Charlie Edson & Red Collier) that Bob & Roger went back down in October only to shoot new fall footage for the movie Roger was making and to make it look like it happened then. This would explain how the film got processed so fast too.
Bobbie
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2009, 7:55 pm #5

This is how you investigate...gather evidence, talk to those involved then make a statement from evidence not an opinion from what you think...

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2009, 8:04 pm #6

in verifying facts Bobbie...they're in a denial mode regardless of film or written evidence...typical politician move...throw enough sxxx on the wall and hope enough of it sticks...
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Bobbie Short
Bobbie Short

October 9th, 2009, 8:35 pm #7



There is a very old saying Jim....
"A lie repeated often enough becomes history; a rumor repeated often enough becomes fact."
Ambrose Bierce, (The Devil's Dictionary)

Think about that for a minute, we've been fed a song & dance for 43 years...

There will always be rats that follow the pied-piper. Occasionally there will be
a larger rat who will be able to see over the ******* in front of him.....
and when he does, daylight will wash his face.... (he will see clearly)

How many times did my Irish grandmother say that to me? LOL
Bobbie
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2009, 8:38 pm #8

Some are so blinded with lies they refuse to see the truth...
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Cindy
Cindy

October 10th, 2009, 1:24 pm #9


There is a very old saying Jim....
"A lie repeated often enough becomes history; a rumor repeated often enough becomes fact."
Ambrose Bierce, (The Devil's Dictionary)

Think about that for a minute, we've been fed a song & dance for 43 years...

There will always be rats that follow the pied-piper. Occasionally there will be
a larger rat who will be able to see over the ******* in front of him.....
and when he does, daylight will wash his face.... (he will see clearly)

How many times did my Irish grandmother say that to me? LOL
Bobbie
Your Irish grandmother sounds like she was a wise woman n/t
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