dunno what you think about meldrum but..

dunno what you think about meldrum but..

SasquatchMs
SasquatchMs

August 8th, 2012, 10:23 pm #1

this is an amazing read, i know lots of people think hes phony but when you put this much science and research into a topic and write a 16 page scientific paper breaking down the locomotion of apes,humans and early humans ...well speaks for your credibility and knowledge in itself, i for one think hes 100%

http://www.scientificexploration.org/jo ... eldrum.pdf
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woodswatcher
woodswatcher

August 9th, 2012, 2:18 am #2

we all have our full time jobs that we do, I would imagine in Academia teaching in colleges you have to have a "specialty" and that seems to be his.

I wonder how many students he gets to assist his research.

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hogue34
hogue34

August 9th, 2012, 10:05 am #3

this is an amazing read, i know lots of people think hes phony but when you put this much science and research into a topic and write a 16 page scientific paper breaking down the locomotion of apes,humans and early humans ...well speaks for your credibility and knowledge in itself, i for one think hes 100%

http://www.scientificexploration.org/jo ... eldrum.pdf
I think Meldrum is ok. He is pretty knowledgeable and since Dr. Grover Krantz is no longer with us, I honestly don't know of anyone else foremost authority wise.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 9th, 2012, 6:55 pm #4

The opening paragraph...

He speaks of the mid tarsal break comparing this to the apes...makes sense doesn't it...but if this is some type of ape only why do Monsters have opposable thumbs?...if Monsters, according to Meldrum, are bipeds why would they need a mid tarsal joint?...the mid tarsal joint is for climbing, grasping and found only in quadrupeds...here in most southern areas there aren't any mountains to need a mid tarsal joint for climbing but yet they do have them...why?...

Meldrum studies cast tracks without having or with very limited field research in areas of activity...he bases his analogy on the Patterson film along with a few pictures taken after the filming of the Patterson footage...I've seen a few of his pictures that show, maybe, a mid tarsal break...

From field experience...sightings in areas of activity...Monsters are not only bipeds but can quite handily go down on on all fours becoming a quadruped...the quadruped part is what Meldrum neglects in his theory of these creatures belonging to the ape family...personally from sightings, field experience, I also believe these Monsters are some type of ape but my belief comes from experience and not from looking at casts or pictures of tracks...

Is Meldrum good for this community?...I would think he is to a point...every cryptid critter needs some type of academic to help support and promote...but IMO...he needs hands on more then on casts and pictures...His analogy reminds me of a person reading the first few pages of a book and making up an ending that suits what they think...
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scottt from philly
scottt from philly

August 9th, 2012, 8:15 pm #5

wouldnt the mid tarsal joint make it much easier for the to go down on all 4's, and much faster on all 4's?
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sasquatchms
sasquatchms

August 9th, 2012, 8:55 pm #6

The opening paragraph...

He speaks of the mid tarsal break comparing this to the apes...makes sense doesn't it...but if this is some type of ape only why do Monsters have opposable thumbs?...if Monsters, according to Meldrum, are bipeds why would they need a mid tarsal joint?...the mid tarsal joint is for climbing, grasping and found only in quadrupeds...here in most southern areas there aren't any mountains to need a mid tarsal joint for climbing but yet they do have them...why?...

Meldrum studies cast tracks without having or with very limited field research in areas of activity...he bases his analogy on the Patterson film along with a few pictures taken after the filming of the Patterson footage...I've seen a few of his pictures that show, maybe, a mid tarsal break...

From field experience...sightings in areas of activity...Monsters are not only bipeds but can quite handily go down on on all fours becoming a quadruped...the quadruped part is what Meldrum neglects in his theory of these creatures belonging to the ape family...personally from sightings, field experience, I also believe these Monsters are some type of ape but my belief comes from experience and not from looking at casts or pictures of tracks...

Is Meldrum good for this community?...I would think he is to a point...every cryptid critter needs some type of academic to help support and promote...but IMO...he needs hands on more then on casts and pictures...His analogy reminds me of a person reading the first few pages of a book and making up an ending that suits what they think...
why did you formulate that large un-educated opinion without connecting more dots, instead of just basing stuff off the limited things you've seen? ....not very scientific.
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M.K.Davis
M.K.Davis

August 9th, 2012, 9:14 pm #7

this is an amazing read, i know lots of people think hes phony but when you put this much science and research into a topic and write a 16 page scientific paper breaking down the locomotion of apes,humans and early humans ...well speaks for your credibility and knowledge in itself, i for one think hes 100%

http://www.scientificexploration.org/jo ... eldrum.pdf
The mid tarsal break concept regarding hominids,is an interpretation of tracks left in the ground. Sometimes there is more than one cause for the same effect. When I was at Bluff Creek in June of this year, I simply imitated the walking "style" seen in the Patterson film, and it produced the ridge in nearly every track. This does not exclude the possibility of flexation in the mid foot, but it should remind us that suggestion is very strong coming from academics. An educational degree is not a guarantee of accuracy but it is the college or university vouching for this person's competency in his field. Many with degrees in the same field disagree strongly with Dr. Meldrum. Time in the field usually helps with how a person see's footprints and interprets them. I had to go there myself and experiment with my own foot in the unique sand of that area to know for sure what I was looking at. M.K.
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Lone Wolf
Lone Wolf

August 9th, 2012, 10:47 pm #8

wouldnt the mid tarsal joint make it much easier for the to go down on all 4's, and much faster on all 4's?
like a chimpanzee, there needs to be a mid tarsal break or flexation in order to facilitate quadruped locomotion.

BF probably did not evolve the stiffer design foot that we have due to the terrain he lives in.
Our feet are designed for long distances on relatively flat terrain.

Meldrum's ideas make sense to me.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 10th, 2012, 2:22 pm #9

why did you formulate that large un-educated opinion without connecting more dots, instead of just basing stuff off the limited things you've seen? ....not very scientific.
Is from over twenty years of experience in areas of activity...while many of you thrill seekers want to see a track or hear some type of unidentifiable sound I want and I'm going to find, see and hunt the Monsters...I knew about the mid tarsal joint, what I called a hinge, from tracking more then several Monsters long before Meldrum wrote any paper concerning the foot...

You need to know and understand that being an academic means you have a sheep skin on the wall...it doesn't give you needed experience from field observation...




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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 10th, 2012, 2:43 pm #10

N/T
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