British Section!

British Section!

Pavel Korchargin
Pavel Korchargin

May 10th, 2009, 3:08 pm #1

Did anybody back in the 1980s used to listen to the British Service of Radio Moscow. These broadcasts were especially tailored to a British audience and went about for about one hour at 8.00pm every evening. They had programmes such as "Commentator Answers Listeners Questions", "This Younger Generation" and "Moscow Mailbag".One of their announcers had a perfect English accent and was named Doris Maximova.Every edition of "Moscow Mailbag" had a letter from certain "Miss Amy Smith" from the Shetland Islands. Infact an associate went to the USSR as the winner of a Radio Moscow competition "The influence of the Russian Language in the World Today", back in the mid-1980s. Radio Moscow provided an alternative media to the imperialist press, particularly at the time of the Great Miners strike 1984-85.Let go down the memory lane of boardcasting from the good Socialist camp!
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The Listener
The Listener

May 10th, 2009, 3:50 pm #2

Yes, I'm glad you brought this up. It was in fact known as the Great Britain and Ireland Service of Radio Moscow. I have fond memories of listening to it as a enthusiastic schoolboy in the mid to late 1980s. I think they also had a current affairs segment called "In The News Today". The name of Amy Smith does ring a bell. Some of us were fairly regular correspondents with socialist countries' radio stations. I didn't write to Radio Moscow so much. I certainly listened to them almost daily for the news, but I was more of a fan of Radio Tirana, Radio Berlin International, Radio Prague and Radio Bucharest. Radio Tirana was great because it was about the only way (in those pre-Internet times) you could find out anything about Albania, its great history with its heroic struggles for independence, its rich culture and wonderful folk music. I could day much the same for Radio Bucharest, while Radio Berlin International and Radio Prague offered insights into socialist countries whose level of development weren't that far removed from western European countries, so they offered a good example of what really existing socialism could have been like. I also loved Radio Berlin International and Radio Prague because they sent out free first day covers, something that greatly appealed to me as a stamp collector. What socialist countries' radio stations did other comrades enjoy listening to, and why?
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Pavel Korchargin
Pavel Korchargin

May 10th, 2009, 4:24 pm #3

I used to correspond very often with the British Section of Radio Moscow and on occasions with the World Service of RM. I believe the head of the British Secton correspondence department was a young lady called Elena Romanova. I even at times used to receive from Radio Moscow programme synopies. I had as matter of course Radio Moscow Schedules sent out every six months.I only turned off Radio Moscow when the dreadful perestrokia reached its counter-revolutionary conclusion.

Another station from the USSR was the "Radio Station Peace and Progress- the Voice of Soviet Public Opinion".This station seemed to broadcast at illregular hours of the day and night and would last for about half an hour. Was it the Soviet Peace Committee behind its operations?

Radio Berlin International had a weak signal unfortunately. They boardcast in the late afternoon. I could really only listen to it on Sundays. I remember "Hay - Mr.Postman" being as played as the signature tune of "The Post Bag Programme".RBI used to send out DDR booklets,"DDR Review" and a youth magazine "Contact". I got the impression that most of the RBI annoucners were expats by their accents.

Well Good Old Radio Tirana is a whole story to itself. Just to say it was in my top 4 radio stations from the socialist countries.
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John Peet (Former Reuters correspondent)
John Peet (Former Reuters correspondent)

May 10th, 2009, 9:14 pm #4

We have discussed this on this forum a few times over the years. I was an avid listener to all the socialist stations, and always looked forward to the books, magazines, records, pennants, etc.

Radio Berlin International was my favourate, and I even went to visit the station as a teenager. Loads more info about it, and a few Where Are They Now? snippets about the presenters onhttp://radioberlininternational.blog.co.uk/

Many of the Soviet republics also had their own English language stations. I remember Radio Vilnius, Radio Kiev, and Radio Tashkent.

At the age of 14, in the 70s, I wrote to Radio Hanoi - The Voice of Vietnam voluteering to join them in the fight. I got a reply back thanking me, and suggesting that campaigning for peace at home would be a much better idea.-JP
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NM
NM

May 10th, 2009, 9:31 pm #5

My first - not terribly successful - attempt at learning Russian involved the Radio Moscow course in the late 1970s. I've still got the coursebooks they sent out to applicants. I recall the biggest problem was the signal drift - you'd be trying to listen to the exercises and repeat the phrase, and the station would disappear, to be replaced by those weird psychedelic sounds that populated the bandwidth between 41m and 49m, or, worse still, that strangely metallic voice of the Radio Tirana anouncer...
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Pavel Korchargin
Pavel Korchargin

May 10th, 2009, 11:55 pm #6

Radio Tirana, the voice of Marxism-Leninism was a firm favourite of mine. I recall with joy listening to such delights as "Marxism-Leninism - an Ever Young and Scientific Theory" "For National and Social Liberation" "A Review of the Marxist-Leninist Movements Across the World". In the review programme you got to hear roundups of the actvities of the all the pro-Albanian M-L parties including our very own RCP-ML.Radio Tirana quoted "Workers Weekly" back in 1985 announcing the formation of the Trade Union Revolutionary opposition(a bloody good idea)by the RCP-ML.
As regards the announcers,it sounded like as if some of them had learned their english in Beijing.Then was that the ever-continuing mystery of the woman announcer(she was like the leading one) who had what a sort of a Lancshire or Blackpool accent. Perhaps she was either an Albanian who had lived in the UK or an CPE or RCPB-ML member. Some people claim she was even of New Zealand origin.

On Radio Tirana they used read extracts from the latest works of Comrade Enver such as "The Two Superpowers" and later on from Ramiz Alia (His memiors "Our Enver"). Due to the revolutionary influence of Radio Tirana and their calls for militant class struggle aganist US Imperialism and Soviet Social Imperialism i for a brief time flirted with Hoxhaism.
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The Listener
The Listener

May 11th, 2009, 12:22 am #7

I listened to Radio Tirana from 1987 to 1992. The programmes had titles such as "Leafing Through the Marxist-Leninist Press" (which quoted the organs of pro-Albania parties, such as "Workers' Weekly" of the RCPB-ML), "Socialism and the Youth", "Introducing You to Albania", "The Song of Our Life", "Profile" (a later addition, I think this appeared around 1990). They also had the occasional programme of revolutionary music from around the world, which I remember included some pieces by the musicians of the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-Leninist) (is any of that available online) and classics such as the German revoutionary anthem "Roter Wedding". At the time, Radio Tirana had the most powerful medium wave transmitter in Europe (1000kW in Lushnjë - a lovely city near the Adriatic). The transmitter was built by our Chinese comrades in the 1960s. Radio Tirana also had quite a powerful signal on shortwave at 9480 kHz. As it was just outside the official shortwave band, it was free from interference from other stations. The woman with the interesting accent who worked as a Radio Tirana announcer was June Taylor (her married name is June Prifti). She accompanied her father (a New Zealand dentist) to Albania in the early 1970s (I think), and got a job at the radio station. She stayed there for around 20 years. I think she still lives in Albania but haven't heard anything about her recently.
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The Listener
The Listener

May 11th, 2009, 3:36 am #8

Radio Tirana, the voice of Marxism-Leninism was a firm favourite of mine. I recall with joy listening to such delights as "Marxism-Leninism - an Ever Young and Scientific Theory" "For National and Social Liberation" "A Review of the Marxist-Leninist Movements Across the World". In the review programme you got to hear roundups of the actvities of the all the pro-Albanian M-L parties including our very own RCP-ML.Radio Tirana quoted "Workers Weekly" back in 1985 announcing the formation of the Trade Union Revolutionary opposition(a bloody good idea)by the RCP-ML.
As regards the announcers,it sounded like as if some of them had learned their english in Beijing.Then was that the ever-continuing mystery of the woman announcer(she was like the leading one) who had what a sort of a Lancshire or Blackpool accent. Perhaps she was either an Albanian who had lived in the UK or an CPE or RCPB-ML member. Some people claim she was even of New Zealand origin.

On Radio Tirana they used read extracts from the latest works of Comrade Enver such as "The Two Superpowers" and later on from Ramiz Alia (His memiors "Our Enver"). Due to the revolutionary influence of Radio Tirana and their calls for militant class struggle aganist US Imperialism and Soviet Social Imperialism i for a brief time flirted with Hoxhaism.
Just a minor correction, the Radio Tirana programme you are referring to was actually called "Marxism-Leninism, An Ever-Young and Scientific Doctrine". I still have their 1987 programme schedule somewhere. I will try to dig it out and scan it. They also used to run contests. I remember entering one in 1988 called "What Do You Know About Albania". The top prize was a holiday in Albania. I was one of the runners-up, and won a cassette of lovely Albanian light music. This whetted my appetite for the genre, and I am still a fan of the likes of Luan Zhegu, Parashqevi Simaku and Bashkim Alibali. And I remain the proud owner of a copy of "Our Enver" sent to me Radio Tirana in 1988.
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Cuban Pete (from Barnsley)
Cuban Pete (from Barnsley)

May 11th, 2009, 9:14 am #9

I don't know what he is singing about (the good old days?)but he carries the song well and does not have a bad voice:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZSyewjz9 ... re=related
I think link is going to break, so comrades who are interested will need to use You Tube search engine.
best wishes,
Cube
I hope O.P. doen't get the grumps.
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Cuban Pete (from Barnsley)
Cuban Pete (from Barnsley)

May 11th, 2009, 9:23 am #10

The link did not break so here is another:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KgE7wyMfUfY
Cube
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