Looking for a CNA to join our family

Looking for a CNA to join our family

Laura Brittain
Laura Brittain

May 4th, 2008, 2:05 am #1

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
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Joined: February 23rd, 2007, 5:42 am

May 5th, 2008, 2:26 am #2

I'm under the impression that a CNA has to work under a nurse's license and supervision.
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Shelley
Shelley

May 5th, 2008, 3:07 pm #3

I believe that you can by your own insurance to work on your own. At least that is what I was told in class.
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Joined: September 4th, 2007, 12:39 pm

May 6th, 2008, 10:28 pm #4

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
I have been offered these types of things numerous times, and i must say for the state I live in, this would be a pretty sweet deal if you were on fire for doing private duty, and have chosen to become a "career cna" without any intentions of widening your scope. In truth, they could offer me $100,000 a year to take that assignment and I would not touch it, because once my basic needs are met, I am fine. Everyone is different. I just happen to like working in ICUs and cardiac stepdown units where the acuity is to the point that every single patient is a time bomb. I have a passion for getting people well, but once they are medically stable, it sounds harsh, but they are no longer interesting to me. I will stuff them into their car, wish them good luck and tell them to never smoke again, and start looking for the next time bomb. High acuity is what makes me come alive. For some, it is the intricacies of how to figure out what an alzheimer's patient is trying to tell you when everything else about them is working just fine. All types of direct care are equally important. Try as many things as you can, as soon as you can, so that you find out what makes you come alive. If I was at all interested in taking this deal, step one would be to find out which state this lake is located in, and see if the money offered and the flexibility would allow me to widen my scope at some future date. Where I used to live, there is a huge geriatric population and these positions are filled by experienced nurses that get sick of the high acuity, or whose bodies can't take the punishment of bedcare anymore. When in doubt, check it out.

peace always,

xtech64
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Joined: September 4th, 2007, 12:39 pm

May 6th, 2008, 10:56 pm #5

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
when i was new to the business, i was obsessive about details to the point where it made me a bit slow. the RNs weren't crazy about it, but because the families were, the RNs left me alone. On the date of one of our resident's discharge, the family approached me with a private duty offer, and said they were looking for a "quality" CNA like me because the last person they employed didn't mow the lawn often enough, and were unimpressed by the CNA's lack of attention to the tile on the kitchen floor. This was the mid 1990s and the offer was $7.00 per hour and nothing else, not a single perk. A horrible wage even then. There was absolutely no guarantee on the number of hours you would receive. It could be anywhere between 0 and 40, and this family expected me to be on call if they wanted to go see a movie and come right back, and then I would be expected to leave. Imagine waiting for the telephone to ring all day. It might not ring that day. If it was movie day, perhaps you would receive two hours pay. Yes, $14.00 for sitting around the house all day, and being run off of the premises when they got home. this was the most outrageous offer i received, and i picked this one to make a point. when i completed my very first shift as a CNA, i immediately understood why unions existed. get this straight in your mind. you are in a licensed profession that can never be fully automated, and you will never have to participate in a recession while you are licensed. claim your power and never let people abuse you. don't be fooled. there are people out there who will take your kindness, and leverage it to get you into a weak position that you can't get out of. this does not have to happen. once again, when in doubt, check it out.

peace always,

xtech64
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Janay Jefferson
Janay Jefferson

May 8th, 2008, 5:01 pm #6

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
I am interested in joining your family. I am a CNA i have been doing this for sometime now and i know as a nurse i can fufill my patients needs.If you are still looking for someone to join your family please email me at Scoprio117@yahoo.com
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cna guy
cna guy

May 11th, 2008, 12:24 pm #7

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
For 1400.00 a month...good luck finding quality care. You want someone to take care of your Father 24/7...plus rehab....plus housework for 1400.00? Good luck, you will be lucky if you find someone that can speak english fluently, anyone that would do that job is desperate for housing....a full time CNA working at a hospital would recieve around $25,000 a year...more with experience...plus health and pension benefits.... so no benefits...no insurance...and only 1400.00 a month? The fact you offer room and board is not really any incentive because whoever took this job would be working 24/7. Good luck...closest your going to find is a fresh immigrant looking for work....you will be lucky if they speak english...
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Joined: May 21st, 2007, 3:01 am

May 15th, 2008, 1:55 am #8

I am looking for a live-in CNA to stay with my father. He is 57 and has suffered a stroke but is extremely easy to work with. Salary is $1,400.00 per month. You would have a private room with french doors leading to a deck overlooking Lake Rhodhiss, with wireless internet, cable TV and all meals and board provided. In addition to caring for my father, you would be expected to help take care of the house and work with my dad on his rehab. Good references are a must. Please email daandyaya@aol.comif intererested.
I'm sure to some people this would be a sweet deal, but I have and would decline a job offer like this. I would not be on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for just $350 a week! That's a joke! Room and board or not, you'll be certain to work your tail off well over 8 hours a day. Plus housework.....OMG! At this rate, it probably pans out to be less than minimum wage! Who knows how many hours a day you'll really be expected to work! I did not really read this message until today. I am upset over this! I reluctantly agree with the last poster! Is this all we are worth? I don't know what kind of CNA this family is expecting.....but I doubt anyone will stay long enough to show their true caliber-unless the CNA has nowhere else to go. I wish this family well in finding a CNA who will devote thier life/body for $350 a week. Lets not forget about taxes!

Just a few weeks ago, I went on a group job interview for a home health care agency. They wanted to pay just 7.15 an hour and reimburse $13.00 a week for fuel. This was a joke to me. You didn't get paid for a job until you got there. You don't get paid for traveling to get there. They expected us to care for 2-4 residents a day on 2 hour jobs. To me, traveling 5-10 miles in between each job was not worth the $13.00 gas reimbursement. Were talking traveling over 50 miles a day. $13.00 wouldn't even give me a quarter tank! That would last me a half a day! At 7 bucks an hour, I would end up loosing more than gaining by taking this job. Plus wear n tear on my vehicle. I need to survive too, so I kindly declined. I understand there is not enough money to pay us CNA's, but sometimes you miss out on quality care by being cheap. You cannot expect someone to put out more than your willing to give.
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Joined: September 4th, 2007, 12:39 pm

May 15th, 2008, 3:40 am #9

i have a bachelor's degree from a state university in a finance-related major. I worked in a southern state for a hotel as an "account clerk" that paid $7.00 an hour, with moderately good benefits. Because the wages were generally low in this area, that would be about right for the level of responsibility. Shortly after I started, it became clear that they expected me to be a staff accountant (which I had the credential to do) and an internal auditor at the same time (which i had the training to do). Either one of those jobs alone would have paid a minimum of $35,000 per year for a new graduate with absolutely no experience, even in this area where the wages were lower. Now, this was not Motel 6. This is a well known company where marble and brass are everywhere, gold leaf around the moulding. You get the idea. Because it was close to a beach, the hotel made tons of cash from rooms, and tons more renting conference space. Who came up with the idea "$7.00 is a fair wage for this situation"? The guy that had the job before me warned me about it, and then left to go work for Northrup Grumman and was immediately making more money than he could spend as a staff accountant there. I knew I would be gone in less than 30 days, and I was. I took their money to put food on the table while I was getting my CNA license. The day that they terminated me, I shook his hand and smiled. I could not have cared less.

peace always,

xtech64
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Katherine
Katherine

May 15th, 2008, 11:51 am #10

I'm sure to some people this would be a sweet deal, but I have and would decline a job offer like this. I would not be on call 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for just $350 a week! That's a joke! Room and board or not, you'll be certain to work your tail off well over 8 hours a day. Plus housework.....OMG! At this rate, it probably pans out to be less than minimum wage! Who knows how many hours a day you'll really be expected to work! I did not really read this message until today. I am upset over this! I reluctantly agree with the last poster! Is this all we are worth? I don't know what kind of CNA this family is expecting.....but I doubt anyone will stay long enough to show their true caliber-unless the CNA has nowhere else to go. I wish this family well in finding a CNA who will devote thier life/body for $350 a week. Lets not forget about taxes!

Just a few weeks ago, I went on a group job interview for a home health care agency. They wanted to pay just 7.15 an hour and reimburse $13.00 a week for fuel. This was a joke to me. You didn't get paid for a job until you got there. You don't get paid for traveling to get there. They expected us to care for 2-4 residents a day on 2 hour jobs. To me, traveling 5-10 miles in between each job was not worth the $13.00 gas reimbursement. Were talking traveling over 50 miles a day. $13.00 wouldn't even give me a quarter tank! That would last me a half a day! At 7 bucks an hour, I would end up loosing more than gaining by taking this job. Plus wear n tear on my vehicle. I need to survive too, so I kindly declined. I understand there is not enough money to pay us CNA's, but sometimes you miss out on quality care by being cheap. You cannot expect someone to put out more than your willing to give.
This is not a 24/7 job. My family is offering all food, rent, gas, water, electric, internet, cable with private room and deck over the lake plus $1400 a month. There are rarely nights involved. It is a live-in situation because my mom delivers the mail and regardless of the weather - she has to be there. Also, because my dad sleeps late, if the caregiver lived they would not have to be at my parents home by 6:30 every morning but could sleep later. My parents are extremely neat and my mom keeps there home spotless - since there is not a lot to do during the day I do not think asking someone to keep my fathers room and their own tidy, wash the dishes they use and keep the area where they spend the day clean is an OMG as Pam put it. My mom would like to be able to have dinner out with her granddaughter every once in awhile... I guess that is an OMG also.

This situation is not for a patient with high needs. It is not at all like Pam's dramatic post of a family looking to use and abuse someone.
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