WTIC Radio On Goldkette

WTIC Radio On Goldkette

Scott
Scott

December 13th, 2009, 2:50 am #1

I found this site for WTIC radio out of Hartford Connecticut. They broadcast a series of big band interviews and programs during the 1970's and these links are on their website. One of the more interesting to Bix fans is a show on Jean Goldkette where the host talks to Spiegle Willcox and Bill Challis about Bix and the Goldkette band. The link ishttp://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-24.html. If it doesn't work let me know and I will send an alternate link to the main site. Sorry if this has been covered before
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 13th, 2009, 12:35 pm #2


.... April 2008. Worth listening again!

The link you gave does not work because it has a period at the end. The following works

http://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-24.html

Fascinating program. We had a long thread on this, beginning with

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1209062300

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 13th, 2009, 12:57 pm #3

I found this site for WTIC radio out of Hartford Connecticut. They broadcast a series of big band interviews and programs during the 1970's and these links are on their website. One of the more interesting to Bix fans is a show on Jean Goldkette where the host talks to Spiegle Willcox and Bill Challis about Bix and the Goldkette band. The link ishttp://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-24.html. If it doesn't work let me know and I will send an alternate link to the main site. Sorry if this has been covered before
.... WTIC site. See

http://www.goldenage-wtic.org/log-bb.html

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 13th, 2009, 1:52 pm #4

I found this site for WTIC radio out of Hartford Connecticut. They broadcast a series of big band interviews and programs during the 1970's and these links are on their website. One of the more interesting to Bix fans is a show on Jean Goldkette where the host talks to Spiegle Willcox and Bill Challis about Bix and the Goldkette band. The link ishttp://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-24.html. If it doesn't work let me know and I will send an alternate link to the main site. Sorry if this has been covered before
Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang were not part of the working Goldkette band when Bix was with Goldkette. Eddie and Joe were added for recordings. Bill Challis said that when the numbers were played on the road, Bix would take the solos that Joe and Eddie had taken in the recording. That gave me an idea. Maybe arrangements could be made of the Goldkette recordings where the violin solo is replaced by a cornet solo in the style of Bix but keeping the guitar as Eddie had played it. I don't mean use Venuti's notes played on cornet, although that might be interesting too as an experiment; I mean a newly created solo in the style of Bix blending with the original Goldkette arrangement, instead of Venuti's solo. I hope this suggestion is not viewed as presumptuous on my part. Just an idea for expanding the repertoire of recreations/reinventions of Bix's music without copying note for note what Bix was doing.

Another related idea would be making arrangements of tunes we wish Bix had recorded (Star Dust, Angry, Too Busy, Ain't Misbehaving, etc) following closely the style of Godlkette for some tunes, Whiteman for other tunes, or Trumbauer with Bix for still other tunes, re-inventing the way these bands would have done such tunes. The model for this would be Hyman and Pletcher's "If Bix Played Gershwin." Maybe, "If Bix Had Recorded These Tunes."

Albert

 
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Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

December 13th, 2009, 2:33 pm #5

.... April 2008. Worth listening again!

The link you gave does not work because it has a period at the end. The following works

http://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-24.html

Fascinating program. We had a long thread on this, beginning with

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1209062300

Albert
Not having heard this broadcast before, I listened enthralled to the reminiscences of three legends from the 1920's being interviewed, Spiegle Willcox (aged 69 at the time), Bill Challis and Joe Venuti. Whenever the subject of Bix came up, there was a genuine warmth there in their memories of him and the great Gene Goldkette Orchestra. Unfortunately most of their "Hot" performances were restricted to their playing in public and not the recording studio. Don't miss!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 13th, 2009, 8:41 pm #6

.... WTIC site. See

http://www.goldenage-wtic.org/log-bb.html

Albert
One of the programs is a conversation with George T. Simon.

http://www.goldenage-wtic.org/BB-15.html

Fascinating material. There is a segment where Simon talks about Bix. Here is that segment.

http://bixography.com/SimonSays.ram

Bix did not die in his 30s, but at age 28. <em>Changes</em> is the second recording of Bix with Whiteman (the first was <em>Washboard Blues</em>, discussed in a recent thread). Fantastic recording! Bix plays his solo using a mute. I wonder why he chose (or the arranger, Bill Challis) chose to do so.

Albert
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

December 14th, 2009, 4:27 pm #7

Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang were not part of the working Goldkette band when Bix was with Goldkette. Eddie and Joe were added for recordings. Bill Challis said that when the numbers were played on the road, Bix would take the solos that Joe and Eddie had taken in the recording. That gave me an idea. Maybe arrangements could be made of the Goldkette recordings where the violin solo is replaced by a cornet solo in the style of Bix but keeping the guitar as Eddie had played it. I don't mean use Venuti's notes played on cornet, although that might be interesting too as an experiment; I mean a newly created solo in the style of Bix blending with the original Goldkette arrangement, instead of Venuti's solo. I hope this suggestion is not viewed as presumptuous on my part. Just an idea for expanding the repertoire of recreations/reinventions of Bix's music without copying note for note what Bix was doing.

Another related idea would be making arrangements of tunes we wish Bix had recorded (Star Dust, Angry, Too Busy, Ain't Misbehaving, etc) following closely the style of Godlkette for some tunes, Whiteman for other tunes, or Trumbauer with Bix for still other tunes, re-inventing the way these bands would have done such tunes. The model for this would be Hyman and Pletcher's "If Bix Played Gershwin." Maybe, "If Bix Had Recorded These Tunes."

Albert

 
It would have been great if there had been a Bix "Stampede" --
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alan
alan

December 15th, 2009, 3:05 am #8

Joe Venuti and Eddie Lang were not part of the working Goldkette band when Bix was with Goldkette. Eddie and Joe were added for recordings. Bill Challis said that when the numbers were played on the road, Bix would take the solos that Joe and Eddie had taken in the recording. That gave me an idea. Maybe arrangements could be made of the Goldkette recordings where the violin solo is replaced by a cornet solo in the style of Bix but keeping the guitar as Eddie had played it. I don't mean use Venuti's notes played on cornet, although that might be interesting too as an experiment; I mean a newly created solo in the style of Bix blending with the original Goldkette arrangement, instead of Venuti's solo. I hope this suggestion is not viewed as presumptuous on my part. Just an idea for expanding the repertoire of recreations/reinventions of Bix's music without copying note for note what Bix was doing.

Another related idea would be making arrangements of tunes we wish Bix had recorded (Star Dust, Angry, Too Busy, Ain't Misbehaving, etc) following closely the style of Godlkette for some tunes, Whiteman for other tunes, or Trumbauer with Bix for still other tunes, re-inventing the way these bands would have done such tunes. The model for this would be Hyman and Pletcher's "If Bix Played Gershwin." Maybe, "If Bix Had Recorded These Tunes."

Albert

 
What you've suggested is very interesting and very possible. I've been playing a transcription of "I'm Gonna Meet My Sweetie Now" with the college jazz orchestra I direct. At a couple of rehearsals, I or one of the other trumpets "covered" the spot where the violin solo takes place while our violinist was away. Naturally, it works perfectly and I wouldn't be surprised if Bill wrote that solo spot with Bix in mind-even though Joe Venuti solos on the recording. Bix makes his presence known earlier in the chart where he's the lead voice over three saxophones and it would make sense to leave space him to improvise a solo.
I conducted and played on two radio shows produced by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. in tribute to Paul Whiteman in 1995-96. We made use of a number of unrecorded Whiteman pieces from the "Old Gold" radio era and many of these tunes ("Ain't Misbehavin', "I've Got A Feeling I'm Falling", "Love Me Or Leave Me" and "Mean To Me") all had spots for Bix. They were arranged by either Challis or Lennie Hayton and really displayed the jazz side of the Whiteman orchestra-both in terms of the solo spots and the ensemble writing. Too bad Columbia passed on recording these at the time!
Thanks for the great website!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

December 15th, 2009, 1:17 pm #9


Thanks for your posting and your kind words.

Some information about Alan. He is a faculty member in the Jazz Studies program at Capilano University in Vancouver, Canada. Alan also teaches trumpet and jazz piano at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, as well as at Vancouver Community College. Alan has a lot in common with Andy S. They both have a strong interest in Bix, play trumpet or cornet and piano, and have degrees from prestigious universities in Illinois, Alan from Northwestern University, Andy from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champagne.

The two Canadian Broadcasting Corporations programs about Whiteman were entitled "Paul Whiteman and Friends" (March 1995) and "Paul Whiteman - The King of Symphonic Jazz" (March 1996). Alan conducted and was soloist. Interesting that Alan played in one of the CBC programs Bill Challis' arrangement of Fats Waller's  "Ain't Misbehaving," one of the tunes I wished Bix had recorded. Alan, do you happen to have a recording of that tune played in the CBC program? I imagine that for Bix's solo, Challis's arrangement simply left room for Bix to do his thing.

Albert

 
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alan
alan

December 15th, 2009, 10:21 pm #10

Thanks Albert for the kind introduction. Regarding the arrangement of "Ain't Misbehavin'", the opening chorus is for solo trumpet-straight melody-and was a spot for Charlie Margulis. Then follows a solo spot for Trumbauer (24 bars-the strings play the bridge), the verse (which you rarely hear today) and then a transition to the vocal. On the score, this is marked "Vocal for Crosby". After the vocal the band takes the tune out, richly scored a la "Reaching For Someone" (arranged by Bill Challis around the same time as "Ain't...")with the melody carried in 3 separate octaves {from high to low} by the strings, 1st trumpet and baritone sax. There's a solo section for Bix at the final bridge which has brass section punctuations ("shots") that help climax the cornet solo. The band plays the last 8 bars of the melody with a short 4 tag added on the end of the tune.
This material from the concerts you mentioned above did get recorded but since the recordings belongs to the CBC, I cannot share them at this time. I'm hoping to get the funding together to license and release this material at some point. We also recorded some relatively unknown arrangements for the Whiteman band by Jimmy Mundy (including an interesting "Take The A Train"), Don Redman ("Henderson Stomp" from 1926), Bill Challis ("Milenberg Joys" and "Limehouse Blues" from 1938-both built to feature the Teagarden brothers) and Artie Shaw ("One Foot In The Groove" and "Non-Stop Flight" no doubt used on Shaw's guest spots on Whiteman's Chesterfield show c.1938-39).
This is a great forum and I enjoy all the information that gets posted here.
I should mention that I wouldn't have taken up the cornet if not for Bix. When I was 9 years of age, I heard an 8 bar solo on "The Love Nest" on the RCA Victor LP "Paul Whiteman, Volume One" and I had an epiphany as to what I wanted to do with my life! Thanks Bix!
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