Who is drummer?

Who is drummer?

Andrei
Andrei

July 6th, 2010, 6:22 pm #1

This video, dating from 1929.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z3RL1fr7TE

Drummer very looke like is Victor Berton. Does it he?

And what is title of film?



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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 6th, 2010, 9:36 pm #2


The youtube video is a fragment from the Paramount 1930 film "Applause" with Helen Morgan, directed by Rouben Mamoulian. The movie was filmed in 1929 in the Kaufman Astoria Studios in Queens, NY. Berton was making a lot of recordings at this time in New York with Red Nichols, Don Voorhes, the Ipana Troubadours, the Cotton Pickers and Merle Johnston.

The star of "Applause" was Helen Morgan.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://image3.examiner.com/images/blog/ ... Morgan.jpg">

She sings "What Wouldn't I Do for that Man" and "Give Your Little Baby Lots of Loving."

Helen Morgan's Oct 8, 1929 recording of "What Wouldn't I Do for that Man" can be heard at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MV71-4KrCtg<a href="http://videos.wittysparks.com/id/960914162"></a>

Helen Morgan was in the Broadway premiere (1927) and revival (1932) of "Show Boat." She played the role of Julie Laverne.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on July 6th, 2010, 9:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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David Logue
David Logue

July 7th, 2010, 12:10 pm #3

What a cool piece of 1929 (or 1930). Given the clarity of the image, my initial thought was that the film was from the 1940s. It's interesting to think that Bix may have seen this very clip.

Are any of the other musicians recognizable?

The guy on the banjo looks right at the camera at one point. Obviously a newcomer to the film-making experience! And I wonder what he's saying to Berton that's making them smile.
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Laura Demilo
Laura Demilo

July 7th, 2010, 6:51 pm #4

- I own a copy. Available on Kino video, on DVD, and the quality and condition of the 1929 film is superlative. Also, it's not a typical "stagnant camera" early talkie where the entire film just looks like a stage play with people standing around emotionally speaking. There's lots of sophisticated camera movement and the sound reproduction is especially superior for its time. It's quite an interesting story -- a blowsy, past-her-peak vaudeville entertainer performing in the sleaziest dives gives birth to a daughter in the 1910's and while the child is still a tot, she realizes the sordid backstage life isn't appropriate for her little girl, and uses all her savings to educate her daughter in a fine Catholic boarding school. The no-good cad boyfriend of this woman persuades her to take the daughter out of school at age 17 and make her "earn her own keep" and "join the act", exposing the sheltered, gently-reared teen to a squalid life she could hardly imagine for herself. Plus sleazy boyfriend is making passes at the adolescent behind mamma's back, so the girl runs away from him and manages to meet a nice boy, a young sailor on leave who protects her, and they fall in love. Helen Morgan is great as the has-been performer and her sad end in the story is harrrowingly done. The musical "acts" in the film are very watchable, realistic and believable of what entertainment in crummy low theaters was like in the 1920's -- I heartily recommend this movie to everyone, and over 80 years later this film is still lauded as a treasure.

Laura (I love early talkie movies from the late 1920's, and have managed to collect all kinds of neat out of print stuff on video. just ask me what I HAVEN'T seen friom that era! :D )
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David Sager
David Sager

July 7th, 2010, 9:35 pm #5

The youtube video is a fragment from the Paramount 1930 film "Applause" with Helen Morgan, directed by Rouben Mamoulian. The movie was filmed in 1929 in the Kaufman Astoria Studios in Queens, NY. Berton was making a lot of recordings at this time in New York with Red Nichols, Don Voorhes, the Ipana Troubadours, the Cotton Pickers and Merle Johnston.

The star of "Applause" was Helen Morgan.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://image3.examiner.com/images/blog/ ... Morgan.jpg">

She sings "What Wouldn't I Do for that Man" and "Give Your Little Baby Lots of Loving."

Helen Morgan's Oct 8, 1929 recording of "What Wouldn't I Do for that Man" can be heard at

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MV71-4KrCtg<a href="http://videos.wittysparks.com/id/960914162"></a>

Helen Morgan was in the Broadway premiere (1927) and revival (1932) of "Show Boat." She played the role of Julie Laverne.

Albert
My great uncle Nat Brusiloff is the violin-playing conductor of the burlesque pit orchestra near the opening of the film. He was doing a bit of work out in Astoria in those days.
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

July 8th, 2010, 12:47 pm #6

What a treasure, knowing your uncle Nat is in that old flick!

Oh, and I was groping around trying to remember the term "burlesque" to describe what the stage people did in that movie. Thanks for jogging my memory -- it's the heat. :D

Laura
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Jamaica
Jamaica

July 8th, 2010, 2:52 pm #7

- I own a copy. Available on Kino video, on DVD, and the quality and condition of the 1929 film is superlative. Also, it's not a typical "stagnant camera" early talkie where the entire film just looks like a stage play with people standing around emotionally speaking. There's lots of sophisticated camera movement and the sound reproduction is especially superior for its time. It's quite an interesting story -- a blowsy, past-her-peak vaudeville entertainer performing in the sleaziest dives gives birth to a daughter in the 1910's and while the child is still a tot, she realizes the sordid backstage life isn't appropriate for her little girl, and uses all her savings to educate her daughter in a fine Catholic boarding school. The no-good cad boyfriend of this woman persuades her to take the daughter out of school at age 17 and make her "earn her own keep" and "join the act", exposing the sheltered, gently-reared teen to a squalid life she could hardly imagine for herself. Plus sleazy boyfriend is making passes at the adolescent behind mamma's back, so the girl runs away from him and manages to meet a nice boy, a young sailor on leave who protects her, and they fall in love. Helen Morgan is great as the has-been performer and her sad end in the story is harrrowingly done. The musical "acts" in the film are very watchable, realistic and believable of what entertainment in crummy low theaters was like in the 1920's -- I heartily recommend this movie to everyone, and over 80 years later this film is still lauded as a treasure.

Laura (I love early talkie movies from the late 1920's, and have managed to collect all kinds of neat out of print stuff on video. just ask me what I HAVEN'T seen friom that era! :D )
Thanks for the heads-up, Laura, I just put it on my Netflix list!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 9th, 2010, 10:11 pm #8

My great uncle Nat Brusiloff is the violin-playing conductor of the burlesque pit orchestra near the opening of the film. He was doing a bit of work out in Astoria in those days.
.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpAY25Awafo&NR=1

not to the video intially cited by Andrei (the violin player in the nightclub scene is not Uncle Nat).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z3RL1fr7TE

You can see Uncle Nat in the terrific video of  "I'm More Than Satisfied" by the Capitolians. He plays "single hair" violin!

http://www.dailymotion.com/video/x1gbm2 ... itol_music

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 9th, 2010, 10:30 pm #9

This video, dating from 1929.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Z3RL1fr7TE

Drummer very looke like is Victor Berton. Does it he?

And what is title of film?


.... "The tune they're playing in the <span class="yshortcuts" style="background:transparent none repeat scroll 0% 0%;border-bottom:medium none;">YouTube clip</span>, "Give Your Little Baby Lots of Lovin'," reminds me of the Selvin version of that tune (Ed <span class="yshortcuts" style="border-bottom:#366388 2px dotted;">Blossom</span> and his New Englanders on Harmony 809-H) on the LP "It Sounds Like Bix."  It's worth hearing again for the nice trumpet playing.  No idea who it is, though!"

Rob sends a file of the recording. Thanks Rob. Nice recording. Great trumpet obbligato behind the vocal and trumpet work throughout the recording. Could it be Tommy Gott? I think the vocalist is the ubiquitous Irving Kaufman!

http://bixography.com/GiveYourLittleBabyEdBlossom.ram

Albert
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Steve Zalusky
Steve Zalusky

July 20th, 2010, 6:54 pm #10

- I own a copy. Available on Kino video, on DVD, and the quality and condition of the 1929 film is superlative. Also, it's not a typical "stagnant camera" early talkie where the entire film just looks like a stage play with people standing around emotionally speaking. There's lots of sophisticated camera movement and the sound reproduction is especially superior for its time. It's quite an interesting story -- a blowsy, past-her-peak vaudeville entertainer performing in the sleaziest dives gives birth to a daughter in the 1910's and while the child is still a tot, she realizes the sordid backstage life isn't appropriate for her little girl, and uses all her savings to educate her daughter in a fine Catholic boarding school. The no-good cad boyfriend of this woman persuades her to take the daughter out of school at age 17 and make her "earn her own keep" and "join the act", exposing the sheltered, gently-reared teen to a squalid life she could hardly imagine for herself. Plus sleazy boyfriend is making passes at the adolescent behind mamma's back, so the girl runs away from him and manages to meet a nice boy, a young sailor on leave who protects her, and they fall in love. Helen Morgan is great as the has-been performer and her sad end in the story is harrrowingly done. The musical "acts" in the film are very watchable, realistic and believable of what entertainment in crummy low theaters was like in the 1920's -- I heartily recommend this movie to everyone, and over 80 years later this film is still lauded as a treasure.

Laura (I love early talkie movies from the late 1920's, and have managed to collect all kinds of neat out of print stuff on video. just ask me what I HAVEN'T seen friom that era! :D )
I'm reading a fascinating book about filmmaking in New York called "Hollywood on the Hudson." I haven't gotten very far with it yet, but I have no doubt it will touch on "Applause." By the way, they showed another feature - a lesser one - with Helen Morgan at Cinevent in Columbus, Ohio. "Roadhouse Nights" was also shot in New York and is the film debut of Jimmy Durante. Here is a YouTube clip from it.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SI57mZd3Kow
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