Whiteman Stomp.

Whiteman Stomp.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 22nd, 2011, 2:43 pm #1

Last edited by ahaim on November 22nd, 2011, 7:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 22nd, 2011, 7:53 pm #2


But it is Whiteman's recording!

According to  "Tommy Dorsey: Livin' in a Great Big Way" b<span class="addmd">y Peter J. Levinson,</span>

<span class="addmd">"Not surprisingly, Tommy Dorsey would regale his fellow Whiteman musicians with imitations of Armstrong's famous solos on cornet, and in a demonstration of his desire to become a respected jazz trombonist, in his solo on <em>Whiteman Stomp</em>."</span>

<span class="addmd">According to Rayno, Tommy does not solo here. The 4+4+4 trombone part is played by Wilbur Hall.</span>

<span class="addmd">Don Redman also wrote the arrangement for <em>Sensation Stomp</em>, the old ODJB tune. Here it is</span>

<span class="addmd">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TCVtVlO7PPI  This is fast!!</span>

<span class="addmd">Albert</span>
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

November 22nd, 2011, 8:25 pm #3

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 23rd, 2011, 12:17 am #4

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 23rd, 2011, 5:04 pm #5


I am pretty certain that Jo Trent was African American. I found several articles in the New York Amsterdam News that clearly demonstrate this fact.
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Songwriters In Top Ranks As Creators Of Our Music by Jack Yellen
<font face="Times New Roman">
</font><font face="Times New Roman">New York Amsterdam News (1962-1993); </font><font face="Times New Roman">Jun 25, 1966.</font>
<font face="Times New Roman">This article provides a list of "negro songwriters in ASCAP. " It includes selected compositions. Here is the entry for Jo Trent.</font>

<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Jo Trent - "Muddy Waters, "My Kinda Love," "Maybe I'm Wrong Again."</font></font>

<font face="Times New Roman">When Florence Mills died, the following article was published in the New York Amsterdam News.</font>
<font face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Poets Profuse With Miss Mills Poems: Jo Trent, Ann Lawrence, Henry B. Wilkinson Among Contributors

<font face="Times New Roman">The New York Amsterdam News (1922-1938); </font><font face="Times New Roman">Nov 9, 1927.</font>
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Harlem's poets did not fail to express their sentiments over the recent death of Florence Mills. Jo Trent, who wrote the lyrics for "Rang Tang," is publishing a song called "You Live On In My Memory."</font></font>

<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">An article about "our song writers [sic]."</font></font>
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font></font></font><p align="left">With Our Song Writers Along Tin Pan Alley

<font face="Times New Roman"><font face="Times New Roman">WORDS AND MUSIC
</font><font face="Times New Roman">The New York Amsterdam News (1922-1938); </font></font><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Mar 26, 1930.</font></font><p align="left">The names cited in this article are Spencer Williams, Maceo Pinkard, James J. Johnson, Eubie Blake, etc. "What has happened to Jo Trent of "Muddy Water" fame. This clever lyricist went to the coast some months ago with his publisher, Jack Robbins, and was apparently doing well on the lots with such songs as "Wake Up Chillun," "Got A Feeling For You" and others."
<p align="left">And here is the smoking gun:
<p align="left">
<p align="left">a photo of Jo Trent in the New York Times with an article written by Jo Trent.
<p align="left">I will go to the local libray later today or in a couple of days and look up Jo Trent in ancestry.com. Maybe I'll write to the University of Pennsylvania and ask for a course transcript.
<p align="left">Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 23rd, 2011, 8:09 pm #6


Bix recorded several songs penned by Jo Trent.

- <strong>Just An Hour of Love</strong>. Frank Trumbauer's Orchestra. Sep 30, 1927.



- <strong>I'm Wondering Who.</strong> Frank Trumbauer's Orchestra. Sep 30, 1927.

- <strong>Goose Pimples</strong>. Bix Beiderbecke and His Gang. Oct 25, 1927.
 


- <strong>Dixie Dawn</strong>. Paul Whiteman' Orchestra. April 23, 1928.



- <strong>Rhythm King</strong>. Bix Beiderbecke and His Gang. Sep 21, 1928.



Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 25th, 2011, 9:24 pm #7

I am pretty certain that Jo Trent was African American. I found several articles in the New York Amsterdam News that clearly demonstrate this fact.
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Songwriters In Top Ranks As Creators Of Our Music by Jack Yellen
<font face="Times New Roman">
</font><font face="Times New Roman">New York Amsterdam News (1962-1993); </font><font face="Times New Roman">Jun 25, 1966.</font>
<font face="Times New Roman">This article provides a list of "negro songwriters in ASCAP. " It includes selected compositions. Here is the entry for Jo Trent.</font>

<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Jo Trent - "Muddy Waters, "My Kinda Love," "Maybe I'm Wrong Again."</font></font>

<font face="Times New Roman">When Florence Mills died, the following article was published in the New York Amsterdam News.</font>
<font face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Poets Profuse With Miss Mills Poems: Jo Trent, Ann Lawrence, Henry B. Wilkinson Among Contributors

<font face="Times New Roman">The New York Amsterdam News (1922-1938); </font><font face="Times New Roman">Nov 9, 1927.</font>
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Harlem's poets did not fail to express their sentiments over the recent death of Florence Mills. Jo Trent, who wrote the lyrics for "Rang Tang," is publishing a song called "You Live On In My Memory."</font></font>

<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">An article about "our song writers [sic]."</font></font>
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font></font></font><p align="left">With Our Song Writers Along Tin Pan Alley

<font face="Times New Roman"><font face="Times New Roman">WORDS AND MUSIC
</font><font face="Times New Roman">The New York Amsterdam News (1922-1938); </font></font><font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">Mar 26, 1930.</font></font><p align="left">The names cited in this article are Spencer Williams, Maceo Pinkard, James J. Johnson, Eubie Blake, etc. "What has happened to Jo Trent of "Muddy Water" fame. This clever lyricist went to the coast some months ago with his publisher, Jack Robbins, and was apparently doing well on the lots with such songs as "Wake Up Chillun," "Got A Feeling For You" and others."
<p align="left">And here is the smoking gun:
<p align="left">
<p align="left">a photo of Jo Trent in the New York Times with an article written by Jo Trent.
<p align="left">I will go to the local libray later today or in a couple of days and look up Jo Trent in ancestry.com. Maybe I'll write to the University of Pennsylvania and ask for a course transcript.
<p align="left">Albert
In a previous posting I mentioned that Jo Trent had gone to the west coast and was doing well in the studios. Here is confirmation. The 1930 US Census lists a Jo Trent, age 37, born in Illinois, profession "music composer," living with wife Nancy and mother in law on Clarence Avenue, LA. All three are described in the column "color or race" as "negr."

I also looked up Joseph and Joe Trent, but upon a quick examination, I did not find one to match "our" Jo Trent. I wrote to the University of Pennsylvania and asked about the possilbe enrollment of a Jo/Joseph Trent. Let's see  if I get an answer.

Albert
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