WBIX # 174

WBIX # 174

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 30th, 2010, 11:53 am #1

Last edited by ahaim on May 3rd, 2010, 12:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 30th, 2010, 12:32 pm #2


I can't get enough of this great tune written by Collie Knox and Vivian Ellis. It happens to me all the time, I can't stop listening to a tune, by the same artist or by several artists.

Listen to Jimmy Dorsey at 49 sec and  1:13 in the Dorsey Brothers version

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/dorseyb ... eblues.ram

Doesn't he sound a lot like Tram?

Lots of versions in youtube and the redhotjazz archive

Waring's Pennsylvanians http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzFknTWws5s (a bit of a Bixian thing at ca 1:55)

Ray Starita  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utE-cWC9FS8 

Jimmy Joy http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/joy/theyaleblues.ram (fast version; great arrrangement)

Arthur Briggs http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/briggs/yaleblues.ram (nice, relaxed version)

Emerson Gill and His Bamboo Gardens Orchestra (who are these guys? Excellent! Nat Natoli was in the band in 1926; they recorded in New York and Chicago))http://www.archive.org/details/EmersonG ... eBlues1928

Albert

 
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 30th, 2010, 9:44 pm #3


Bridget, what do you think of this?



Mr. J.G.W. writes that "The Yale Blues" is based on the Tango. I imagine JGW is an Englishman, and therefore probably has no idea of what a real tango is. Here is a tango as danced in the 1935 film "Tango Bar."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOpAvx5tpUg

First you see Tito Lusiardo, and then the immortal Carlos Gardel cuts in. This is the way the tango was danced from the 1920s into the 1950s. [My wife and I won a tango contest in 1951 in one of the dances organized by the student association of the University of Uruguay. We danced it just as you see in the above youtube]. Bridget, do you think that the classic style of dancing the tango has anything remotely resembling "The Yale Blues" style of dance? I seriously doubt it. I'would be interested in your opinion.

Albert
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Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

May 1st, 2010, 10:28 am #4

I can't get enough of this great tune written by Collie Knox and Vivian Ellis. It happens to me all the time, I can't stop listening to a tune, by the same artist or by several artists.

Listen to Jimmy Dorsey at 49 sec and  1:13 in the Dorsey Brothers version

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/dorseyb ... eblues.ram

Doesn't he sound a lot like Tram?

Lots of versions in youtube and the redhotjazz archive

Waring's Pennsylvanians http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzFknTWws5s (a bit of a Bixian thing at ca 1:55)

Ray Starita  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utE-cWC9FS8 

Jimmy Joy http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/joy/theyaleblues.ram (fast version; great arrrangement)

Arthur Briggs http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/briggs/yaleblues.ram (nice, relaxed version)

Emerson Gill and His Bamboo Gardens Orchestra (who are these guys? Excellent! Nat Natoli was in the band in 1926; they recorded in New York and Chicago))http://www.archive.org/details/EmersonG ... eBlues1928

Albert

 
I agree Albert, we don't hear this catchy little tune nearly often enough. English composer Vivian Ellis wrote the "Yale Blues" in 1927. Recorded in London on 30th September 1927 by The Savoy Orpheans with a mainly American line up (Frank Guarente on trumpet) and conducted by Carroll Gibbons.
Brian Rust's sleeve notes: "The number took the public fancy in the way the Charleston and Black bottom had. The song describes the mythical effect of a new collegiate dance on the American dancing public, and on Harvard in particular! It had all that any of the American "novelty" dance numbers of the time had: a good tune, an engaging, enticing rhythm, slow but not stodgy, and (when sung) a lyric that was all the better for being slightly tongue-in-cheek."
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 2nd, 2010, 2:28 pm #5

I can't get enough of this great tune written by Collie Knox and Vivian Ellis. It happens to me all the time, I can't stop listening to a tune, by the same artist or by several artists.

Listen to Jimmy Dorsey at 49 sec and  1:13 in the Dorsey Brothers version

http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/dorseyb ... eblues.ram

Doesn't he sound a lot like Tram?

Lots of versions in youtube and the redhotjazz archive

Waring's Pennsylvanians http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzFknTWws5s (a bit of a Bixian thing at ca 1:55)

Ray Starita  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utE-cWC9FS8 

Jimmy Joy http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/joy/theyaleblues.ram (fast version; great arrrangement)

Arthur Briggs http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/briggs/yaleblues.ram (nice, relaxed version)

Emerson Gill and His Bamboo Gardens Orchestra (who are these guys? Excellent! Nat Natoli was in the band in 1926; they recorded in New York and Chicago))http://www.archive.org/details/EmersonG ... eBlues1928

Albert

 
A style of music? A type of dance? Both? Neither? In his article in the Gramophone  issue of Dec 1927, J.G.W classifies the following recordings, among others, as Yale Blues,

Play it Red - Original Memphis Five

Ida - Red Nichols and His Five Pennies

Do you agree? To me, the fantastic recording of "Ida" is a slow Fox-Trot, a jazz ballad.

JGW provides designations to a number of recordings in his article,



He uses the following designations, Black Bottom, Charleston, Fox-Trot, Waltz and Yale Blues. Do you agree with JGW's assignements? For example, look at some of the recordings he classifies as Charleston:

Here I am Broken Hearted - Lou Gold

Sixty Seconds Every Minute - Lou Gold

After You've Gone - California Ramblers

Feelin' No Pain - Red Nichols and His Five Pennies

I'm Somebody's Somebody Now - Annette Hanshaw with Four Instrumental Stars

Really?

Albert

 

 
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Forrest Outman
Forrest Outman

July 22nd, 2012, 7:53 am #6

Bridget, what do you think of this?



Mr. J.G.W. writes that "The Yale Blues" is based on the Tango. I imagine JGW is an Englishman, and therefore probably has no idea of what a real tango is. Here is a tango as danced in the 1935 film "Tango Bar."

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tOpAvx5tpUg

First you see Tito Lusiardo, and then the immortal Carlos Gardel cuts in. This is the way the tango was danced from the 1920s into the 1950s. [My wife and I won a tango contest in 1951 in one of the dances organized by the student association of the University of Uruguay. We danced it just as you see in the above youtube]. Bridget, do you think that the classic style of dancing the tango has anything remotely resembling "The Yale Blues" style of dance? I seriously doubt it. I'would be interested in your opinion.

Albert
Being a dance historian I felt compelled to shed some light on this question for the readers.

You must realize that by 1927 the English style of Tango was quite formalized and tame by comparison. The argument that has been put forward can better be understood when put into the context of the mind of the author. The article is dated December of 1927 which is precisely when "The Yale Blues" began to gain national attention.

For comparison footage please go BritishPathe.com and search for tango, Yale Blues, and Fox Trot. All of the dances discussed can be viewed being performed in the 1920's at BrishePathe.com.

ALSO:
Two of the finest sources for learning English dance history are:

A history of English ballroom dancing, 1910-45. The story of the development of the modern English style, etc. [With portraits.].
by Philip John Sampey Richardson
Book
Language: English
Publisher: London, [1947]

Social dance, a short history.
by A H Franks
Book
Language: English
Publisher: London, Routledge and K. Paul [1963]

In brief, the statement in the 1927 article is perfectly logical when viewed from the perspective of English dancers of that era.

Sincerly, Forrest Outman
of DanceHistory.org
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