Victrola Question

Victrola Question

Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

January 8th, 2010, 5:54 pm #1

Anyone out there experienced at oiling a Victrola? I have an XI 1920 upright model and because of the bad weather our friend who was going to come overand oil it with 3-in-1 can't -- I'd really like to learn the maintenance on it.

Rick and I did print out the facsimilie guide from the Victrola site, but I wanted to get any direct personal hands-on experience from anyone out there, like what to watch out for, what specific parts do you oil, anyone have an awful experience where they accidently wrecked their machine? How on earth would one get a 90 year old phonograph repaired. . . .?

We just don't want to ruin anything, but I'm eager to play my 78's on it.



Laura
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 8th, 2010, 7:04 pm #2


.... explanations and diagrams.

http://www.victor-victrola.com/Repair.htm

My only disagreement with the recommenations is that I prefer molybdenum grease over graphite grease, but that may be my a personal preference on my part. Otherwise, all looks good. I strongly agree that cleaning thoroughly the old grease is crucial. Often a old tooth brush is helpful for some of the sections.

Albert
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Rob Burns
Rob Burns

January 8th, 2010, 8:02 pm #3

Anyone out there experienced at oiling a Victrola? I have an XI 1920 upright model and because of the bad weather our friend who was going to come overand oil it with 3-in-1 can't -- I'd really like to learn the maintenance on it.

Rick and I did print out the facsimilie guide from the Victrola site, but I wanted to get any direct personal hands-on experience from anyone out there, like what to watch out for, what specific parts do you oil, anyone have an awful experience where they accidently wrecked their machine? How on earth would one get a 90 year old phonograph repaired. . . .?

We just don't want to ruin anything, but I'm eager to play my 78's on it.



Laura
Here's another source that may help. I have seven phonographs including a Victrola X1 model.

http://alephnull.net/20s/victrola/victrola.html
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

January 9th, 2010, 3:31 am #4

.... explanations and diagrams.

http://www.victor-victrola.com/Repair.htm

My only disagreement with the recommenations is that I prefer molybdenum grease over graphite grease, but that may be my a personal preference on my part. Otherwise, all looks good. I strongly agree that cleaning thoroughly the old grease is crucial. Often a old tooth brush is helpful for some of the sections.

Albert
Yes, I've been looking at the guides on that Victor-Victrola site, and I am going to inquire of our used record dealer in Pittsburgh -- he has connections to a couple of local people who repair old phonographs and perhaps among them is someone who can work with vintage antique models. This item can't be moved from our house, it's that heavy and cumbersome and actually my husband had to have a teenage boy on our street help him get it in, and he's in good shape himself.

Thanks so much for the advice on what kind of grease to use! I'll surely look into that.

My appreciation -- there's just something so much more alluring and real about playing 78's on the actual item, of course --

kind regards from Laura
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

January 9th, 2010, 3:33 am #5

Here's another source that may help. I have seven phonographs including a Victrola X1 model.

http://alephnull.net/20s/victrola/victrola.html
I did check that out -- WOW, seven old phonographs! Tell me about them, what kind? And you restored and maintain them yourself or had them done?

much appreciated, from Laura
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Rob Burns
Rob Burns

January 9th, 2010, 4:15 pm #6

Hi Laura
I have a Victor Victrola Xl, Edison Diamond Disc Upright (about the same size of the Victrola), Edison 2 minute cylinder home with a morning glory horn, Edison Fireside that plays 2 & 4 minute cylinders with a Cygnet horn, Victor 2 with a black petal horn (also black brass bell horn), Columbia Vivatonal portable circa 1927 and a Victor Electrola R57 model radio/phonograph circa 1931 that sounds incredible. I was a member of The Michigan Antique Phonograph society for about nine years starting in the late seventies which was the heyday of collecting(78's). I done very little on restoration of the machines.I added parts like a gear cover for the Fireside, purchased external horns, ID plate for the Victor 2 and try to keep the maintenance up on these machines. I did have a the main spring replaced on my Edison Home cylinder machine about five years ago. My son wound the machine a little too much! Please call or write(email) if you any other questions? Take care
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

January 9th, 2010, 11:00 pm #7

Well, we will defintely chat! I'm just, uh, wiping a bit of drool off my chin here reading about your exquisite collection of phonographs!

In Jerry's USed Records in Pittsburgh today he told me his son, who maintains and deals with the 78's room, will know of somebody who can come by and advise maintenance on the XI Victrola, so next time Willie's in the store --

While I'm at it, any of you out there with an explicit "wish list", do tell me about and I could go on a finding mission for you; Jerry's is a big, well-kept store of used records and is "known" -- I'll have to pass along the website, or any of you can just type in Jerry's Used Records, Pittsburgh -- but there's all categories, good condition, very reasonable prices, and the selection is staggering. He won't touch cd's, it's all vinyl LP's from the time they were invented in 1949 up to pressings from perhaps the late 1980's; a back room of 45's, and another room of 78's -- each huge warehouse-sized room chock-full, and categorically sorted. Rock and popular is the biggest area but I emphatically state that the selection of trad and progressive jazz is enormous; opera and classical, country-western and general crap like novelty and easy listening but that store has things so long out of print which many of us thought we'd never see again, there. I will maintain that it might be a little tight and difficult to get some of the really hot famous jazz 78's from the 1920's -- the real rarities everyone's after and search eBay for -- but there is a surprising selection notwithstanding of good 1920's and 30's popular and jazz, in beautiful condition -- nothing which has been lying about in a dirty garage or someone's moldy basement. Gennett, Brunswick, Okeh, Velvet Tone (I myself like those cheapie dime-store brands of 80-90 years ago); Perfect, Vocalion, Cameo, Grey Gull, piles of Victor and Columbia sorted by artist.

Any of you give me a holler if you think I'd be able to search something out for you and send it along.

Laura

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Veniero Molari
Veniero Molari

January 12th, 2010, 12:09 am #8


Please do not call "vinyl"our beloved 78 or 80 rpm records; vinyl is the material of the LPs. Few late 78s were pressed in vinyl, but they wore out very fast.
I hear my records with a 1925 Victrola Credenza X (electric) and with a Brunswick Ultona consolette for the 80 rpm, the Edison Diamond and the Pathé. I have also an Edison 39 machine for the 4-minute cylinders. If you like to chat about gramophones (and Bix as well) just e-mail me.

Veniero
Last edited by ahaim on January 12th, 2010, 12:15 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

January 13th, 2010, 3:28 am #9

Vinyl is the catch-all word to describe the LP's and 45's in the used record store in Pgh; I know 78's are shellac, and some a better quality of shellac than others.

Any record chat is welcome.

- Laura
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