Up And At 'Em - The Hottest Of The California Ramblers On Edison

Up And At 'Em - The Hottest Of The California Ramblers On Edison

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2011, 7:01 pm #1

Last edited by ahaim on October 9th, 2011, 7:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 9th, 2011, 7:21 pm #2


I forgot to mention this. Until I listened  carefully to the interpretation of "I Ain't Got Nobody" by the CR, I thought my favorite version was by the Coon-Sanders Nighthawks. Not anymore. I just point out to the Bixian contribution by (I think) Mickey Bloom and the lovely Tommy Dorsey trombone solo.

"I Ain't Got Nobody" is an old song (ca 1915) written by Spencer Williams.



Albert
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vince giordano
vince giordano

October 10th, 2011, 10:07 am #3

One of my favorite tunes, too !

The Coon Sanders version was recorded on 6/25/1927 and the California Ramblers was done on 1/27/1928. If you play them back to back you will see the arrangements are quite similar. I asked Spencer Clark many years ago if he had any info about this arrangement, but he said he could not remember...it was too long ago ! It is not a stock [ I have a few stocks of this song from the 1920s..unless it is a "special" that was published and I haven't found yet]. I really think it was transcribed by someone from the California Ramblers from the Coon Sanders recording and adapted for them. Also: the weird percussion sound beneath Tommy Dorsey's trombone solo was made by Herb Weil cupping/clapping his hands. I asked him about this and he told me this fact ! With the bass sax of Spencer Clark and Herb Weil's hand effect together, it is a unique sound for sure ! Herb and Spencer were friends from childhood and were a great rhythm team.

More about this tune: The first title of this tune was I Ain't Got Nobody Much and it was recorded by Marion Harris in 1916 and Earl Fuller's band in 1918. When it was revived in the 1920s, stock orchestrations and record labels dropped the "Much" part off the title. And finally: I Ain't Got Nobody was recorded by Ernie Golden's Orch for Edison on 9/26/1927 but was rejected...thank goodness it was...otherwise the California Ramblers version would not have been recorded !
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 10th, 2011, 3:32 pm #4


Thanks, Vince. Indeed similar arrangements. The California Ramblers version has no vocal and, being on Edison, it is longer. Thus, the band has more of a chance to play, for example Tommy Dorsey, Mickey Bloom  and (I think) Pete Pumiglio have chances to play solos.

Marion Harris first recorded the tune in her first recording session, Aug 9, 1916, Vic 18133. Accompanied by Orchestra Rosario Bourdon and pianist Ted levy.



You can hear the recording in the LOC Jukebox site.

http://www.loc.gov/jukebox/recordings/detail/id/4993

She recorded the tune again on April 21, 1920, Col A-3371. Accompanied by Orchestra  ?Charles A Prince.

http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/ramr/RiCOLA-3371.ram

She recorded the tune once more in Dec 1922, Br 2395. Accompanied by Orchestra Carl Fenton. The jazziest version

http://www.archive.org/details/MarionHarris-56-60

Oddly enough, the California Ramblers also recorded the tune three times.

Oct 27, 1925 Pathe 36361  I don't have this one.

Aug 12, 1927 Ban 6082, Or 1022, Re 8390, BM 253, OFC 38   bixography.com/IAintGotNobodyCR12Aug1927.mp3

Jan 27, 1928 Ed 52206 (the recording discussed in this thread).  http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/carambl ... tnobody.ra (the sound in Nick's transfer is immensely superior)

You see that the two versions by the California Ramblers are totally different. Is Herb Weil doing the trick with his cupping./clapping hands at 2:31 behind Rollini in the Aug 12, 1927 recording?

I could not write about various versions of "I Ain't Got Nobody" without mentioning the great version by the Rhythmic Eight with the fabulous Finn Sylvester Ahola in a great solo at 2:03.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xnnC-Z00FtQ

Albert
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Richard Iaconelli
Richard Iaconelli

October 10th, 2011, 6:26 pm #5

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 10th, 2011, 8:35 pm #6


In 1904 the Edison commercial studios were moved from West Orange to New York. The West Orange facility remained the experiementing and manufacturing center. Edison was the last major recording studio to move from acoustic to electric recording. It did so in 1927. I believe records made after July are electric, before acoustic. Ed 52088 is supposed to be the last acoustic Edison record.

If the date I gave is correct, then Tracks 1-13 in the Hottest of the California Ramblers on Edison Edison CD are acoustic, and tracks 14-18 are electric.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 10th, 2011, 10:04 pm #7

Last edited by ahaim on October 10th, 2011, 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 12th, 2011, 2:53 pm #8


According to Rust's Jazz Discography. the reed players in the June 23, 1925 California Ramblers recording of <em>Collegiate</em> are Jimmy Dorsey and Arnold Brilhart.

The first recording of Bobby Davis with the California Ramblers was cut on Aug 2, 1923, the last on Nov 11, 1931. (Rust, Dance Band Discography). Davis had two periods where he does not appear in California Ramblers recordings: Nov 1924 to Jul 1925 and Sep 1927 to Jun 1930 (at this time Davis was either with the New Yorkers or in England). However, in Jan-Apr 1925 he recorded with the Five Birmingham Babies and in Jun 1925 with the Goofus Five and the Little Ramblers. [He also recorded with Bailey's Lucky Seven in Jun 1925]. It is not as if Davis was not a member of the California Ramblers Organization in the first half of 1925. Jimmy Dorsey recorded with the Varsity Eight in Feb-Jun 1925 and with the California Ramblers in Dec 1924 to Jul 1925. It looks like Jimmy and Bobby divided the recordings in the first half of 1925 as follows: Jimmy with the California Ramblers and the Varsity Eight; Bobby with the Goofus Five, the Five Birmingham Babies and the Little Ramblers. Does this make sense? If we go by discographical information, Jimmy replaced Bobby in the California Ramblers in Dec 1924 and Bobby replaced Jimmy in Jul 1925. Interestingly, Bobby Davis recorded with Spike Hughes in Apr 1930 and was replaced by Jimmy Dorsey in May 1930.

Albert
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

October 12th, 2011, 3:04 pm #9

In 1904 the Edison commercial studios were moved from West Orange to New York. The West Orange facility remained the experiementing and manufacturing center. Edison was the last major recording studio to move from acoustic to electric recording. It did so in 1927. I believe records made after July are electric, before acoustic. Ed 52088 is supposed to be the last acoustic Edison record.

If the date I gave is correct, then Tracks 1-13 in the Hottest of the California Ramblers on Edison Edison CD are acoustic, and tracks 14-18 are electric.

Albert
Albert,

What you say about tracks 1-13 being acoustic and 14-18 being electric is correct.

Thank you for your kind comments about the CD.


Nick

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 12th, 2011, 10:49 pm #10

..... with the underrated Bobby Davis doing a terrific solo. Listen to Collegiate, Ed 51560, Jun 23, 1925.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpeUh9My ... re=related

The sheet music with Jean Goldkette's Orchestra on the cover.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixography.com/CollegiateShetMus ... te1924.jpg">

The same cover except that the band is the Nixon Restaurant Orchestra.

flickr.com/photos/jeremyhopkin/4108671896/sizes/l/in/photostream.jpg

The Nixon Restaurant Orchestra was from Pittsburgh and the leader was an Etzi Corvato. Another example of the "iceberg" effect. One of many bands that never recorded.

Albert
Here is an ad for the appearance of the California Ramblers at Bach's Dance Studio in Reading, PA.



Note the mention of  <em>See and hear "Adrian," the world's greatest bass saxophonist in action.</em>

The ad specifies ten musicians. Here are nine from the Jan 27, 1927 recording session: Chelsea Quealey, Roy Johnston, Abe Lincoln, Bobby Davis, Sam Ruby, Adrian Rollini, Jack Russin, Tommy Felline, Herb Weil. Who would be the tenth? Ed Kirkeby?

Albert

 
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