The Wolverines Open At Cinderella

The Wolverines Open At Cinderella

Ralph Wondraschek
Ralph Wondraschek

January 21st, 2018, 12:11 am #1

The following report appeared - rather belatedly - in Metronome Band Monthly, November 1924, p.70:


THE WOLVERINES OPEN AT CINDERELLA

The Wolverines came to New York and opened at the Cinderella, where they were one of the biggest hits that ever hit New York. The Wolverines, under the direction of Richard Voynow, have been the favorite orchestra of all the college and fraternity houses throughout Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan, and Mr. Joseph, general manager of the Cinderella, arranged for them to come to New York after hearing so much about them. After their opening, Mr. Joseph said the best thing he ever did was to bring this orchestra to New York. They have received new names from the visitors of the Cinderella and are known to them as the "personality kids." When Voynow and the Wolverines finish their season's engagement at the Cinderella, they will take their annual leap through Indiana, Ohio and Michigan, where their music is still remembered by all the members of the colleges who always engage them for their annual proms and hops.


The accompanying photograph in Metronome is the well-known one, which is printed in Evans book on page 162, and in Evans & Sudhalter on page 108, bottom.

Nothing really new here, but still nice to have, IMO.

Ralph
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well wisher
well wisher

January 21st, 2018, 10:57 am #2

Obviously a very successful band. One wonders why they split up.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 21st, 2018, 2:14 pm #3

.... join Jean Goldkette in Detroit. Without Bix who was the key member of the band, things were not the same, and after a few months, with a stint in Florida in early 1925, the Wolverines disbanded.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 21st, 2018, 2:59 pm #4

The following report appeared - rather belatedly - in Metronome Band Monthly, November 1924, p.70:


THE WOLVERINES OPEN AT CINDERELLA

The Wolverines came to New York and opened at the Cinderella, where they were one of the biggest hits that ever hit New York. The Wolverines, under the direction of Richard Voynow, have been the favorite orchestra of all the college and fraternity houses throughout Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan, and Mr. Joseph, general manager of the Cinderella, arranged for them to come to New York after hearing so much about them. After their opening, Mr. Joseph said the best thing he ever did was to bring this orchestra to New York. They have received new names from the visitors of the Cinderella and are known to them as the "personality kids." When Voynow and the Wolverines finish their season's engagement at the Cinderella, they will take their annual leap through Indiana, Ohio and Michigan, where their music is still remembered by all the members of the colleges who always engage them for their annual proms and hops.


The accompanying photograph in Metronome is the well-known one, which is printed in Evans book on page 162, and in Evans & Sudhalter on page 108, bottom.

Nothing really new here, but still nice to have, IMO.

Ralph
http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1308927301

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Albert
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Bob Lang
Bob Lang

January 21st, 2018, 7:36 pm #5

The following report appeared - rather belatedly - in Metronome Band Monthly, November 1924, p.70:


THE WOLVERINES OPEN AT CINDERELLA

The Wolverines came to New York and opened at the Cinderella, where they were one of the biggest hits that ever hit New York. The Wolverines, under the direction of Richard Voynow, have been the favorite orchestra of all the college and fraternity houses throughout Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky and Michigan, and Mr. Joseph, general manager of the Cinderella, arranged for them to come to New York after hearing so much about them. After their opening, Mr. Joseph said the best thing he ever did was to bring this orchestra to New York. They have received new names from the visitors of the Cinderella and are known to them as the "personality kids." When Voynow and the Wolverines finish their season's engagement at the Cinderella, they will take their annual leap through Indiana, Ohio and Michigan, where their music is still remembered by all the members of the colleges who always engage them for their annual proms and hops.


The accompanying photograph in Metronome is the well-known one, which is printed in Evans book on page 162, and in Evans & Sudhalter on page 108, bottom.

Nothing really new here, but still nice to have, IMO.

Ralph
Does anyone know if the bronze plaque that had been at the location of the Cinderella Ballroom,commemorating the appearance of the Wolverines, was ever found?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 21st, 2018, 9:32 pm #6

.... but met with failure.
All we have left is a photo courtesy of the late Joe Giordano.

From my article in the Mississippi rag more than a decade ago:

"The Plaque at 1600 Broadway.

The idea of a plaque in honor of Bix at 1600 Broadway came to Bixophile Paul Hutcoe (then in New York City, now deceased) when he learned that a concert in commemoration of Bix's music was to be held in Carnegie Hall in April of 1975. Several of the surviving musicians who had played with Bix were going to be present at the concert. Paul thought that Bix's fellow musicians could be invited to the unveiling of a plaque. With jazz musicians of the caliber of Paul Mertz, Chauncey Morehouse, Bill Rank, and Spiegle Willcox, and arranger Bill Challis, Paul Hutcoe was confident that the event would have even more historical significance. Paul Hutcoe paid for half the cost of the plaque and received contributions from Bill Donahoe - a member of the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Jazz Band and the man responsible for the establishment of the Bix Beiderbecke Memorial Society in Davenport- and from several other Bixophiles. The plaque was unveiled on April 2, 1975. In addition to the musicians mentioned above, Virginia Horvath Morehouse, Chauncey’s wife, was present. Joe Venuti had been invited, but did not attend.

The plaque remained on the front of the building for many years. However, a letter from a reader, F. Tauber, to the New York Daily News issue of July 11, 1987 alerted that "A few months ago, because of painting, a plaque commemorating Leon (Bix) Beiderbecke was removed from the entrance to the Screen Building at 1600 Broadway. The paint has long since dried. Where is the plaque?" Joe Giordano, Bixophile and record collector, tried to contact the building manager, but was unsuccessful. He decided then to organize a letter-writing campaign to have the plaque remounted. In an article in Jersey Jazz, Joe asked all readers to write to the manager of the building at 1600 Broadway and "demand that the plaque be put back." The campaign was successful, witness the fact that the plaque was remounted in 1987.

The plaque remained on the building until about 1998 or 1999. Some work was done on the facade of the building at that time and the plaque was removed. A few years ago, I made some inquiries as to the fate of the plaque. I talked to the building manager: he remembered the plaque, but could not tell me what had happened to it.
The plaque is no longer on the building at 1600 Broadway. Trying to recover it at this point has become a moot point. The building is scheduled for demolition. A landmark for New York City and a shrine for jazzophiles will be gone soon. History will receive another btlow."



Unveiling of the plaque at 1600 Broadway. From left to right: Bill Challis, Spiegle Willcox, Paul Mertz, Chauncey Morehouse, Paul Hutcoe, Bill Rank, Jeff Atherton and Virginia Horvath Morehouse. Photographed by Jack Bradley. July 1975.



Albert
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Bob Lang
Bob Lang

January 21st, 2018, 9:52 pm #7

Albert,

I remember you, Joe Giordano, and I, and maybe a few more people, meeting at the site of the plaque many years ago. We were all hoping that it could be found. I guess, if the building is gone, it doesn't matter that much, but it would be a nice addition to the Bix Museum. Maybe some day it will show up on ebay.

Bob
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 21st, 2018, 10:54 pm #8

.... I remember it well.

Albert
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

January 26th, 2018, 6:20 pm #9

.... join Jean Goldkette in Detroit. Without Bix who was the key member of the band, things were not the same, and after a few months, with a stint in Florida in early 1925, the Wolverines disbanded.

Albert
Listening to bands with Bix and immediately after his departure shows that his actual presence--on the stand or in the recording studio--contributed a lot to the band's sound, apart from his actual playing. As his band mates said in one way or another, he had a lot of ideas that contributed to the arrangements and style of any band he joined. The little glimpse of Bix as leader in Take 1 of "Thou Swell," shaping the tempo of the bridge that Roy Bargy played on piano, tells us something of how he helped craft a performance. His original introductions and conclusions on his Gang recordings and with Tram show that part of his contribution to the records.
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John Coffin
John Coffin

January 27th, 2018, 1:54 am #10

It is striking how much Bix's presence affects his fellows. Without playing a 'usual' lead, there's an excitement that includes everyone. This seems especially strong on the 'Gang' sides.

Its a measure of the quality of the other players that they aren't confused or intimidated by him. On some of Armstrong's early New York records, he sometimes has to play straight quarter notes on the beat so the rhythm players can get back on track. Some of Louis' rhythmic daring seemed to overwhelm the piano-banjo pickup accompanists.
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