The Voice of Bix Beiderbecke

The Voice of Bix Beiderbecke

Brendan Wolfe
Brendan Wolfe

February 19th, 2010, 10:28 pm #1

Quote
Share

Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

February 20th, 2010, 9:45 pm #2

There is only one known example of Bix getting to speak on record. Bix biographer J.P.Lion writes:
"Edgar Jackson, from the British magazine 'Melody Maker', travelled to New York with the Bandleader Jack Hylton in August 1929. He attended one Whiteman performance, at the end of which he recorded on portable equipment (using an aluminium record) the voices of the main musicians of the Band. Bix's voice was recorded. This unique disc was destroyed in 1941, together with Edgar Jackson's other record collections during the bombing of his house in London."
On these records the various members of the Band are supposed to have sent their greetings to the Orchestra's fans in England. These priceless discs, in the ten years they were in existance in London, must have been played occasionally and it's quite possible there is someone still around who has actually heard what was on these discs.
As for the German bomber pilot who destroyed Edgar's house, well he must linger in Hell for all of eternity.
Quote
Share

Linda
Linda

February 21st, 2010, 5:47 am #3

Since the subject of these recordings were greetings from Whiteman band members to the Orchestra's fans in England I would think it possible that that when Edgar Jackson went back to London he would have listened to the discs and had a secretary transcribe what was on the discs and had that published in Melody Maker.
I would think that Edgar Jackson, because he was not just any fan but the editor of the Melody Maker, would want these messages by Whiteman band members to British fans published in the magazine.
To me that would be a possible reason to have the recordings made in the first place. So the records could be played back in England and the messages published in Melody Maker.
Also admittedly a long shot but since the discs lasted until 1941 there were home recording machines in common use in the late 1930's and early 1940's couldn't it have been possible that one person Edgar Jackson played the recordings for have made a dub of them for himself?
I just think someone would have made a copy of the original discs because of their historical importance. As was mentioned the discs must have been played occasionally and someone might have made a home recorded copy of them.
Quote
Share

Linda
Linda

February 21st, 2010, 6:46 pm #4

There is only one known example of Bix getting to speak on record. Bix biographer J.P.Lion writes:
"Edgar Jackson, from the British magazine 'Melody Maker', travelled to New York with the Bandleader Jack Hylton in August 1929. He attended one Whiteman performance, at the end of which he recorded on portable equipment (using an aluminium record) the voices of the main musicians of the Band. Bix's voice was recorded. This unique disc was destroyed in 1941, together with Edgar Jackson's other record collections during the bombing of his house in London."
On these records the various members of the Band are supposed to have sent their greetings to the Orchestra's fans in England. These priceless discs, in the ten years they were in existance in London, must have been played occasionally and it's quite possible there is someone still around who has actually heard what was on these discs.
As for the German bomber pilot who destroyed Edgar's house, well he must linger in Hell for all of eternity.
Another German or whoever did it I would nominate for hades would be the one who caused the death of singer Al Bowlly. I read he was killed in 1941 by the explosion of a parachute mine outside his flat in Jermyn Street, London during the Blitz. What is a parachute mine? I hadn't heard that term before.
Quote
Share

Laura Demilio
Laura Demilio

February 22nd, 2010, 8:19 pm #5

There is only one known example of Bix getting to speak on record. Bix biographer J.P.Lion writes:
"Edgar Jackson, from the British magazine 'Melody Maker', travelled to New York with the Bandleader Jack Hylton in August 1929. He attended one Whiteman performance, at the end of which he recorded on portable equipment (using an aluminium record) the voices of the main musicians of the Band. Bix's voice was recorded. This unique disc was destroyed in 1941, together with Edgar Jackson's other record collections during the bombing of his house in London."
On these records the various members of the Band are supposed to have sent their greetings to the Orchestra's fans in England. These priceless discs, in the ten years they were in existance in London, must have been played occasionally and it's quite possible there is someone still around who has actually heard what was on these discs.
As for the German bomber pilot who destroyed Edgar's house, well he must linger in Hell for all of eternity.
I don't doubt that the greeting to their English admirers had to have been brief -- each Whiteman Orchestra member who spoke on those records probably didn't say much more than their name, and maybe something along the lines of: "Sending greetings and best wishes to England," or something equally short. Of course we can't possibly know, but wouldn't it seem so? Unless we know how many and the length of the discs? Then could there have been interviews, however cursory, consisting of several questions and answers. Or a quick explanation of which instrument they played? But somehow it seems just a couple of sentences at most from each Whiteman member would have been what those recordings consisted of.

Alas, to not know. . . .


Laura
Quote
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 25th, 2010, 2:24 pm #6

Another German or whoever did it I would nominate for hades would be the one who caused the death of singer Al Bowlly. I read he was killed in 1941 by the explosion of a parachute mine outside his flat in Jermyn Street, London during the Blitz. What is a parachute mine? I hadn't heard that term before.
.... this interesting youtube video posted by Enrico.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K1CJJjwr4hY

Very interesting record. Note that the label of the record specifies trumpet,clarinet and two pianos, as well as "vocal refrain, but  does not give the name of the vocalist. Wasn't Al Bowlly sufficiently well known by 1931 that his name would have been given in records where he took the vocal?

Albert

 
Quote
Like
Share