The Sheik by Red Nichols and His (Many More Than) Five Pennies.

The Sheik by Red Nichols and His (Many More Than) Five Pennies.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 1st, 2012, 11:11 pm #1


Th<em>e Sheik of Araby</em> is one of the jazz standards. Lord lists over 600 recordings of the tune. Composed in 1921 by Smith, Wheeler and Snyder,



it was recorded in late 1921 by the Club Royal Orchestra, the California Ramblers and Vincent Lopez's band. There were a couple of recordings in 1922, and then silence until Jul 30, 1930 when Red Nichols and His Five (really twelve) Pennies recorded it in a great arrangement by Glenn Miller. The musicians in the band were <em>la crème de la crème: </em>Red Nichols (c), Ruby Weinstein and Charlie Teagarden (t), Jack Teagarden and Glenn Miller (tb), Benny Goodman (cl), Sid Stoneburn (as), Babe Russin (ts), Joe Sullivan (p), Treg Brown (g), Art Miller (sb, bb), Gene Krupa (d). Jack is on vocal. This recording made <em>The Sheik</em> a "jazz standard." It is a terrific recording. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsiczuYwy1s

The May 1931 issue of Gramophone has a very favorable review.

Good review, but the trombonist who plays the straight melody is not Tommy but Glenn (sounding a bit like Tommy Dorsey). I like that duet very much, with Jack doing a hot improvisation against Glenn's mellow and straight interpretation of the melody. It is fantastic. And Benny is in great shape playing a hot clarinet against the straight rendition of the melody by Babe Russin. Highly inventive arrangement. 

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 1st, 2012, 11:29 pm #2


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQZCn-3nMe0

Perhaps the first banjo solo on record. This version has (to my ears) a certain bittersweet, nostalgic feeling that appeals to me enormously.

Albert
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bixokeh27
bixokeh27

January 3rd, 2012, 8:56 pm #3

Th<em>e Sheik of Araby</em> is one of the jazz standards. Lord lists over 600 recordings of the tune. Composed in 1921 by Smith, Wheeler and Snyder,



it was recorded in late 1921 by the Club Royal Orchestra, the California Ramblers and Vincent Lopez's band. There were a couple of recordings in 1922, and then silence until Jul 30, 1930 when Red Nichols and His Five (really twelve) Pennies recorded it in a great arrangement by Glenn Miller. The musicians in the band were <em>la crème de la crème: </em>Red Nichols (c), Ruby Weinstein and Charlie Teagarden (t), Jack Teagarden and Glenn Miller (tb), Benny Goodman (cl), Sid Stoneburn (as), Babe Russin (ts), Joe Sullivan (p), Treg Brown (g), Art Miller (sb, bb), Gene Krupa (d). Jack is on vocal. This recording made <em>The Sheik</em> a "jazz standard." It is a terrific recording. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsiczuYwy1s

The May 1931 issue of Gramophone has a very favorable review.

Good review, but the trombonist who plays the straight melody is not Tommy but Glenn (sounding a bit like Tommy Dorsey). I like that duet very much, with Jack doing a hot improvisation against Glenn's mellow and straight interpretation of the melody. It is fantastic. And Benny is in great shape playing a hot clarinet against the straight rendition of the melody by Babe Russin. Highly inventive arrangement. 

Albert
2012 is the year of great strides in Nichols research. We have removed the NIGGER Steve Hester from our IAJRC Facebook groups Red Nichols and Hot Records and are dedicated to the destruction of his name, life, and property. I have full authority of the IAJRC to kill this fucker. This is our material not this NIGGER.
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bixokeh27
bixokeh27

January 6th, 2012, 2:13 pm #4

Th<em>e Sheik of Araby</em> is one of the jazz standards. Lord lists over 600 recordings of the tune. Composed in 1921 by Smith, Wheeler and Snyder,



it was recorded in late 1921 by the Club Royal Orchestra, the California Ramblers and Vincent Lopez's band. There were a couple of recordings in 1922, and then silence until Jul 30, 1930 when Red Nichols and His Five (really twelve) Pennies recorded it in a great arrangement by Glenn Miller. The musicians in the band were <em>la crème de la crème: </em>Red Nichols (c), Ruby Weinstein and Charlie Teagarden (t), Jack Teagarden and Glenn Miller (tb), Benny Goodman (cl), Sid Stoneburn (as), Babe Russin (ts), Joe Sullivan (p), Treg Brown (g), Art Miller (sb, bb), Gene Krupa (d). Jack is on vocal. This recording made <em>The Sheik</em> a "jazz standard." It is a terrific recording. Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsiczuYwy1s

The May 1931 issue of Gramophone has a very favorable review.

Good review, but the trombonist who plays the straight melody is not Tommy but Glenn (sounding a bit like Tommy Dorsey). I like that duet very much, with Jack doing a hot improvisation against Glenn's mellow and straight interpretation of the melody. It is fantastic. And Benny is in great shape playing a hot clarinet against the straight rendition of the melody by Babe Russin. Highly inventive arrangement. 

Albert
Have you noticed how wonderful our IAJRC groups are after we eliminated the Nigger, Steve Hester. Yes the NIGGER is in the hospital and I hope will die within the day.

We, the IAJRC, owns and are entitled to the research and materials this NIGGER had. It is ours. FUCK STEVE HESTER AND WE ALL WANT DIE NIGGER.
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John Leifert
John Leifert

January 6th, 2012, 10:18 pm #5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQZCn-3nMe0

Perhaps the first banjo solo on record. This version has (to my ears) a certain bittersweet, nostalgic feeling that appeals to me enormously.

Albert
Thanks for posting that version of "Sheik Of Araby", Albert - somewhere I have a copy of this Vocalion, but have not played it in recent years. It really is quite enjoyable, and certainly this is one of the earliest banjo solos on a dance band recording.

For a wistful quality (not especially hot, but a very smooth dance performance for the era), I can recommend the Benson Orchestra of Chicago's version of "The World Is Waiting For the Sunrise". There is a palpably nostalgic yearning throughout (the scoring for the violins, harmonies, etc.) Beautifully orchestrated, marvelous side.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7oBngcG4zc

It's a medley fox trot, with the second song entitled "Singing", and the composers (on the label) are Seitz-Hylton. Concert pianist Ernest Seitz wrote "...Sunrise" in 1919, and I imagine "Hylton" is the composer of "Singing". JACK Hylton, perhaps ??

John L

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

January 6th, 2012, 11:15 pm #6

<font size="3" face="ArialMT"></font>
From Pete Faint's website.

Singing Jun 7, 1922 Hayes, Middlesex HMV B-1364
<font size="3" face="ArialMT"></font><p align="left">Singing Jul 5, 1922 Hayes, Middlesex Zonophone  Rejected
<font size="3" face="ArialMT"></font>
Singing Sep 20, 1922 Hayes, Middlesex Zonophone 2284
<font size="3" face="ArialMT"></font><p align="left">Singing/In Romany/Jenny ("Experimental, using special machine") May 9, 1923 Hayes, Middlesex HMV Rejected
<p align="left">Very likely, a Jack Hylton composition.
<p align="left">The recording by the Benson Orchestra of Chicago is very much to my liking. I have a weakness for old, acoustic, nostalgic recordings. Thanks for providing the link.
<p align="left">Albert
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