The First Newspaper Announcements of the Camel Pleasure Hour

The First Newspaper Announcements of the Camel Pleasure Hour

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 5th, 2012, 12:45 am #1


The premiere of the Camel Pleasure Hour took place on June 4, 1930 over the NBC network.

Producer: John Wiggin.
Director: Charles Previn.
Announcer: John Young.
Contractor: Nat Shilkret.

Bix was one of the members of one of the orchestras. Other members with connections to Bix were Charlie Margulis, Leo McConville, the Dorsey Brothers, Min Leibrook, Carl Kress, Lennie Hayton, and Arthur Schutt.

Here are some announcements of the program in a couple of newspapers.

Charleston Daily Mail, June 1, 1930.
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Seven outstanding figures of the stage und microphone, augmented by two orchestras and an 18-voicechorus, will inaugurate the Camel Pleasure hour through an extensive National network Wednesday night. Heading the list of those presentingthe program, which will be broadcast for an hour each Wednesday, starting at 9:30 p. m., will be Helen Kane, Doc. Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath, Willard Robison, Mary McCoy, Charles Previn and Billy Hughes.
<p align="left">Burlington Hawkeye, June 1, 1930.
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">A brilliant new radio hour, with unique features and exceptional talent will have its air premiere Wednesday night, June 4, at 7:30 CST. The new program will be knovwn as the Camel Pleasure Hour and is sponaored by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.
<font face="Times New Roman">0n the premiere of the new hour, Helen Kane, "Dr." Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath and Willard Robison will divide honors. <font face="Times New Roman"><font face="Times New Roman">"Doc" Rockwell, for years one of Broadway's famous moneymakers, will be "master of ceremonies." As headliner of many great stage revues, Rockwell is regarded as one of America's foremost humorists. Reinald Werrenrath. the distinguished baritone, will be a fixed star of the Camel Pleasure Hour as will Willard Robistm and </font><font face="Times New Roman">his<em></em></font><font face="Times New Roman">famous Deep River orchestra.</font></font></font>

We know about Helen Kane and Willard Robison. Here is some information about Werrenrath and Rockwell.

The New York Times obituary for Reinald Werrenwrath, Sep 13, 1953.

Obituary, New York Times, Sunday, September 13, 1931, pg 85


<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td valign="top">Birth: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Aug. 7, 1883
Brooklyn
Kings County
New York, USA</td></tr><tr><td valign="top">Death: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Sep. 12, 1953
Plattsburgh
Clinton County
New York, USA</td></tr></table>

Werrenrath Dies; Radio Singing Star
Baritone Who Was Heard in 20's Made Concert Appearances, Owned Music School
Plattsburg, N, Y, Sept. 12 AP
Reinald Werrenrath, concert and radio singing star of the Nineteen Twenties, died today in Physicians Hospital here. He was 70 years old. He had been staying at his summer home at near-by Chazy Lake when he suffered a heart attack a month ago and was admitted to the hospital.
Son of Danish Tenor
Reinald Werrenrath was born in Brooklyn August 7, 1883. He was the son of Charles (sic, the father was George) Werrenrath, a Danish tenor who made joint appearances in Paris with Gounod and who came to Brooklyn as a tenor soloist at Henry Ward Beecher's Plymouth church. His grandfather, John Peter Werrenrath, was well known in Denmark as a song interpreter. His mother, Aretta Camp Werrenrath, was a church and concert singer. With this family background, it was inevitable that young Reinald should turn to singing. He studied first with his father, then with Carl Dufft, Frank King Clark, Dr. Arthur Mees, and Percy Rector Stephens. At New York University, Mr. Werrenrath was soloist with the glee club. With William LeBaron and Deems Taylor, he collaborated on a musical, "The Eternal Question." Mr. Werrenrath made his oratorical debut in 1907 at the Worcester Festival singing Hans Sachs' monologue from "Die Meistersinger." His Metropolitan Opera debut took place February 19, 1919, when he sang Silvio in "Pagliacci," in a cast that included Florence Easton and Enrico Caruso. Later that season he sang Valentin in "Faust" and Escamillo in "Carmen." He did not return to the Metropolitan the next season and thereafter confined himself to concert, oratorio and radio appearances. He was one of the earliest starts of radio, singing regularly over station WEAF, which later became part of the N.B.C. network. During the years 1932-33 he was a member of N.B.C.'s music staff in this city. Mr. Werrenrath concertized widely throughout the United States and in his later years devoted himself to teaching. For several seasons he had conducted a summer music school at Chazy Lake. His last public appearance in this city was made October 23, 1952, when he sang a joint recital at Carnegie Recital Hall with Tom Donahue, tenor. In 1909 he married Ada Petersen. The couple had three children, George Hans, Mrs. Carleton B. Hutchins, Jr., and Reinald, Jr. The couple was divorced in 1927. The following year Mr. Werrenrath married Verna True Nidig, from whom he separated in 1939 and was divorced in 1941. He married Frances M. Aston in 1942.


Doc Rockwell, form Wikipedia.

George Lovejoy "Doc" Rockwell (1889-1978) was an American vaudeville performer and radio personality.

Born in Providence, Rhode Island, Rockwell was a fast-talking "nut comic" who developed an act as a lecturing doctor, sometimes with a stethoscope and an oversized five-foot banana as props, billed as "Doc Rockwell - Quack! Quack! Quack!".

One sign of Rockwell's surprising success was his appearances as the headline act at the Palace Theater in New York, the single most coveted booking in vaudeville. Rockwell headlined at the Palace not once but six times, the first in April 1925, the last in May 1932.<span>[</span>1<span>]</span>

In the 1930s he also appeared on the inaugural bill at the Radio City Music Hall (on December 27, 1932),<span>[</span>2<span>]</span> at the Ziegfeld Theater, and in a single musical comedy film, 1937's The Singing Marine. In 1939 Rockwell had his own short-lived national radio show on NBC, and through the 1940s he was a frequent guest on the radio show of his friend Fred Allen.

He married fellow performer Claire Schade in 1915 in Bloomington, Illinois. Rockwell's first son was George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, whose views his father did not share.

For many years after his retirement from performing, Doc Rockwell contributed a humor column to Down East Magazine, published in his adopted state of Maine. He had the last page from shortly after the magazine's founding in 1954 to his death. Doc always ended his column with "Maker of fine cigar ashes since 1889."

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 5th, 2012, 1:01 am #2


From the Lebanon Daily News, June 30, 1930.



Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 5th, 2012, 3:12 pm #3

The premiere of the Camel Pleasure Hour took place on June 4, 1930 over the NBC network.

Producer: John Wiggin.
Director: Charles Previn.
Announcer: John Young.
Contractor: Nat Shilkret.

Bix was one of the members of one of the orchestras. Other members with connections to Bix were Charlie Margulis, Leo McConville, the Dorsey Brothers, Min Leibrook, Carl Kress, Lennie Hayton, and Arthur Schutt.

Here are some announcements of the program in a couple of newspapers.

Charleston Daily Mail, June 1, 1930.
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Seven outstanding figures of the stage und microphone, augmented by two orchestras and an 18-voicechorus, will inaugurate the Camel Pleasure hour through an extensive National network Wednesday night. Heading the list of those presentingthe program, which will be broadcast for an hour each Wednesday, starting at 9:30 p. m., will be Helen Kane, Doc. Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath, Willard Robison, Mary McCoy, Charles Previn and Billy Hughes.
<p align="left">Burlington Hawkeye, June 1, 1930.
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">A brilliant new radio hour, with unique features and exceptional talent will have its air premiere Wednesday night, June 4, at 7:30 CST. The new program will be knovwn as the Camel Pleasure Hour and is sponaored by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.
<font face="Times New Roman">0n the premiere of the new hour, Helen Kane, "Dr." Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath and Willard Robison will divide honors. <font face="Times New Roman"><font face="Times New Roman">"Doc" Rockwell, for years one of Broadway's famous moneymakers, will be "master of ceremonies." As headliner of many great stage revues, Rockwell is regarded as one of America's foremost humorists. Reinald Werrenrath. the distinguished baritone, will be a fixed star of the Camel Pleasure Hour as will Willard Robistm and </font><font face="Times New Roman">his<em></em></font><font face="Times New Roman">famous Deep River orchestra.</font></font></font>

We know about Helen Kane and Willard Robison. Here is some information about Werrenrath and Rockwell.

The New York Times obituary for Reinald Werrenwrath, Sep 13, 1953.

Obituary, New York Times, Sunday, September 13, 1931, pg 85


<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td valign="top">Birth: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Aug. 7, 1883
Brooklyn
Kings County
New York, USA</td></tr><tr><td valign="top">Death: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Sep. 12, 1953
Plattsburgh
Clinton County
New York, USA</td></tr></table>

Werrenrath Dies; Radio Singing Star
Baritone Who Was Heard in 20's Made Concert Appearances, Owned Music School
Plattsburg, N, Y, Sept. 12 AP
Reinald Werrenrath, concert and radio singing star of the Nineteen Twenties, died today in Physicians Hospital here. He was 70 years old. He had been staying at his summer home at near-by Chazy Lake when he suffered a heart attack a month ago and was admitted to the hospital.
Son of Danish Tenor
Reinald Werrenrath was born in Brooklyn August 7, 1883. He was the son of Charles (sic, the father was George) Werrenrath, a Danish tenor who made joint appearances in Paris with Gounod and who came to Brooklyn as a tenor soloist at Henry Ward Beecher's Plymouth church. His grandfather, John Peter Werrenrath, was well known in Denmark as a song interpreter. His mother, Aretta Camp Werrenrath, was a church and concert singer. With this family background, it was inevitable that young Reinald should turn to singing. He studied first with his father, then with Carl Dufft, Frank King Clark, Dr. Arthur Mees, and Percy Rector Stephens. At New York University, Mr. Werrenrath was soloist with the glee club. With William LeBaron and Deems Taylor, he collaborated on a musical, "The Eternal Question." Mr. Werrenrath made his oratorical debut in 1907 at the Worcester Festival singing Hans Sachs' monologue from "Die Meistersinger." His Metropolitan Opera debut took place February 19, 1919, when he sang Silvio in "Pagliacci," in a cast that included Florence Easton and Enrico Caruso. Later that season he sang Valentin in "Faust" and Escamillo in "Carmen." He did not return to the Metropolitan the next season and thereafter confined himself to concert, oratorio and radio appearances. He was one of the earliest starts of radio, singing regularly over station WEAF, which later became part of the N.B.C. network. During the years 1932-33 he was a member of N.B.C.'s music staff in this city. Mr. Werrenrath concertized widely throughout the United States and in his later years devoted himself to teaching. For several seasons he had conducted a summer music school at Chazy Lake. His last public appearance in this city was made October 23, 1952, when he sang a joint recital at Carnegie Recital Hall with Tom Donahue, tenor. In 1909 he married Ada Petersen. The couple had three children, George Hans, Mrs. Carleton B. Hutchins, Jr., and Reinald, Jr. The couple was divorced in 1927. The following year Mr. Werrenrath married Verna True Nidig, from whom he separated in 1939 and was divorced in 1941. He married Frances M. Aston in 1942.


Doc Rockwell, form Wikipedia.

George Lovejoy "Doc" Rockwell (1889-1978) was an American vaudeville performer and radio personality.

Born in Providence, Rhode Island, Rockwell was a fast-talking "nut comic" who developed an act as a lecturing doctor, sometimes with a stethoscope and an oversized five-foot banana as props, billed as "Doc Rockwell - Quack! Quack! Quack!".

One sign of Rockwell's surprising success was his appearances as the headline act at the Palace Theater in New York, the single most coveted booking in vaudeville. Rockwell headlined at the Palace not once but six times, the first in April 1925, the last in May 1932.<span>[</span>1<span>]</span>

In the 1930s he also appeared on the inaugural bill at the Radio City Music Hall (on December 27, 1932),<span>[</span>2<span>]</span> at the Ziegfeld Theater, and in a single musical comedy film, 1937's The Singing Marine. In 1939 Rockwell had his own short-lived national radio show on NBC, and through the 1940s he was a frequent guest on the radio show of his friend Fred Allen.

He married fellow performer Claire Schade in 1915 in Bloomington, Illinois. Rockwell's first son was George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, whose views his father did not share.

For many years after his retirement from performing, Doc Rockwell contributed a humor column to Down East Magazine, published in his adopted state of Maine. He had the last page from shortly after the magazine's founding in 1954 to his death. Doc always ended his column with "Maker of fine cigar ashes since 1889."

Albert
From the Wisconsin State Jouranl, Jul 7, 1930. Bix was there!
[size=300]<font size="7" face="Times New Roman">[/size]</font><p align="left">O.K. Strike Up The
<p align="left">Band! Here Comes
<p align="left">Doctor Rockwell
<p align="left">Suspenders Trailing, Doc Beats Clock in Wild Dash To Studio
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Eccentric costumes, for obvious reasons. hare never been the standard equipment of radio comedians. But Dr. Rockwell, "down east" wit of the Camel Pleasure hour, has introduced the mode. Recently he burst into the NBC studios clad in an old green raincoat, with collar turned up, opera pumps and full dress trousers, and undershirt and trailing suspenders as the final gestures ot nonchalance.
Here's the story. It was 9:27 o'clock. In three minutes the Camel program would be on the air. Theorchestra tuned; visitors shifted expectantly; John S. Young listened through his announcer's headphones and watched his lights for the program cue; and John Wlggin, production man, mentally called the roll ot participants. Suddenly he gasped.

<p align="left"><strong>Call the Doctor</strong>
<p align="left"> "Where's Rockwell?" No one knew. At the telephone, a casual voice answered from the other end. "No, Dr. Rockwell hasn't left for the NBC. It's only 9:00 o'clock." "You're mistakenit's 9:27!" "Good Lord," and the receiver slammed. Exactly nine minutes later, a weird apparition dashed into the lobby ot the NBC building, knocking  down three brass posts in his mad flight to the elevator,
In the meantime, the program had begun. The opening announcements, the overture and one orchestral  selection had taken up six ot the  sixty minues, and Dr. Rockwell's first cue was at hand. By this time, John

<font face="Times New Roman"><font size="2">S. </font></font><font size="2" face="Times New Roman">Young was  racking his brain for something to say. "Wisecrack, stall, say something  funny," the program sponsors were urging him. And Young was trying to formulate some remark  about walking a mile with Dr. Rockwell. </font><p align="left"><font face="Times New Roman"><strong><font size="2">Without a Shirt</strong></font></font>
<p align="left">At this very instant with the incredible punctuality of such accidents. Dr. Rockwell broke into the studio. Raincoat and suspenders flying, he weaved his way through the orchestral setup to his little table, whispering hoarsely, "I'm here, I'm here," and waving his handful of notes to indicate complete readiness to take the air. He flopped into hischair, and began talking to a coast-to-coast audience. So "Doc" Rockwell served the Camel Pleasure hour without his shirt Say what you will about his raincoat, and dragging suspenders. In one point he was impeccably groomed. His hair was parted perfectly.
<font size="6" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">How Famous Contralto
<p align="left">Met Radio Soprano
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">A happy reunion occurred recently in the New York studios of the National Broadcasting company when Mary McCoy and Mme. Schumann- Heink met. Several years ago on one of her American tours the great German artist was in Kansas City. From the loud speaker in her hotel suit came the appealing voice of a girl. Immediately Mme. Schumann- Heinck was interested. She asked to see the performer. This interview led Mary McCoy, who it was who was singing over the radio, to join the famous contralto's entourage for the remainder of the tour. The inspiration of thisassociation largely is responsible for the success Miss McCoy has enjoyed in recent years, the young artist declares.
Since the time Mary McCoy first met the grand old lady of opera, she has starred in several Broadway musical comedy hits and appears regularly as the featured soprano in a number of National Broadcasting company programs.
Mme. Schumann- Heinck, though a great-grandmother and nearly 70 years old. is today enthusiastic .over the future possibilities ot radio in bringing the best stagers to the homes of the public.
<p align="left">Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 5th, 2012, 8:38 pm #4

The premiere of the Camel Pleasure Hour took place on June 4, 1930 over the NBC network.

Producer: John Wiggin.
Director: Charles Previn.
Announcer: John Young.
Contractor: Nat Shilkret.

Bix was one of the members of one of the orchestras. Other members with connections to Bix were Charlie Margulis, Leo McConville, the Dorsey Brothers, Min Leibrook, Carl Kress, Lennie Hayton, and Arthur Schutt.

Here are some announcements of the program in a couple of newspapers.

Charleston Daily Mail, June 1, 1930.
<font size="2" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Seven outstanding figures of the stage und microphone, augmented by two orchestras and an 18-voicechorus, will inaugurate the Camel Pleasure hour through an extensive National network Wednesday night. Heading the list of those presentingthe program, which will be broadcast for an hour each Wednesday, starting at 9:30 p. m., will be Helen Kane, Doc. Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath, Willard Robison, Mary McCoy, Charles Previn and Billy Hughes.
<p align="left">Burlington Hawkeye, June 1, 1930.
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">A brilliant new radio hour, with unique features and exceptional talent will have its air premiere Wednesday night, June 4, at 7:30 CST. The new program will be knovwn as the Camel Pleasure Hour and is sponaored by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company.
<font face="Times New Roman">0n the premiere of the new hour, Helen Kane, "Dr." Rockwell, Reinald Werrenrath and Willard Robison will divide honors. <font face="Times New Roman"><font face="Times New Roman">"Doc" Rockwell, for years one of Broadway's famous moneymakers, will be "master of ceremonies." As headliner of many great stage revues, Rockwell is regarded as one of America's foremost humorists. Reinald Werrenrath. the distinguished baritone, will be a fixed star of the Camel Pleasure Hour as will Willard Robistm and </font><font face="Times New Roman">his<em></em></font><font face="Times New Roman">famous Deep River orchestra.</font></font></font>

We know about Helen Kane and Willard Robison. Here is some information about Werrenrath and Rockwell.

The New York Times obituary for Reinald Werrenwrath, Sep 13, 1953.

Obituary, New York Times, Sunday, September 13, 1931, pg 85


<table border="0" cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0"><tr><td valign="top">Birth: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Aug. 7, 1883
Brooklyn
Kings County
New York, USA</td></tr><tr><td valign="top">Death: </td><td valign="top" align="left">Sep. 12, 1953
Plattsburgh
Clinton County
New York, USA</td></tr></table>

Werrenrath Dies; Radio Singing Star
Baritone Who Was Heard in 20's Made Concert Appearances, Owned Music School
Plattsburg, N, Y, Sept. 12 AP
Reinald Werrenrath, concert and radio singing star of the Nineteen Twenties, died today in Physicians Hospital here. He was 70 years old. He had been staying at his summer home at near-by Chazy Lake when he suffered a heart attack a month ago and was admitted to the hospital.
Son of Danish Tenor
Reinald Werrenrath was born in Brooklyn August 7, 1883. He was the son of Charles (sic, the father was George) Werrenrath, a Danish tenor who made joint appearances in Paris with Gounod and who came to Brooklyn as a tenor soloist at Henry Ward Beecher's Plymouth church. His grandfather, John Peter Werrenrath, was well known in Denmark as a song interpreter. His mother, Aretta Camp Werrenrath, was a church and concert singer. With this family background, it was inevitable that young Reinald should turn to singing. He studied first with his father, then with Carl Dufft, Frank King Clark, Dr. Arthur Mees, and Percy Rector Stephens. At New York University, Mr. Werrenrath was soloist with the glee club. With William LeBaron and Deems Taylor, he collaborated on a musical, "The Eternal Question." Mr. Werrenrath made his oratorical debut in 1907 at the Worcester Festival singing Hans Sachs' monologue from "Die Meistersinger." His Metropolitan Opera debut took place February 19, 1919, when he sang Silvio in "Pagliacci," in a cast that included Florence Easton and Enrico Caruso. Later that season he sang Valentin in "Faust" and Escamillo in "Carmen." He did not return to the Metropolitan the next season and thereafter confined himself to concert, oratorio and radio appearances. He was one of the earliest starts of radio, singing regularly over station WEAF, which later became part of the N.B.C. network. During the years 1932-33 he was a member of N.B.C.'s music staff in this city. Mr. Werrenrath concertized widely throughout the United States and in his later years devoted himself to teaching. For several seasons he had conducted a summer music school at Chazy Lake. His last public appearance in this city was made October 23, 1952, when he sang a joint recital at Carnegie Recital Hall with Tom Donahue, tenor. In 1909 he married Ada Petersen. The couple had three children, George Hans, Mrs. Carleton B. Hutchins, Jr., and Reinald, Jr. The couple was divorced in 1927. The following year Mr. Werrenrath married Verna True Nidig, from whom he separated in 1939 and was divorced in 1941. He married Frances M. Aston in 1942.


Doc Rockwell, form Wikipedia.

George Lovejoy "Doc" Rockwell (1889-1978) was an American vaudeville performer and radio personality.

Born in Providence, Rhode Island, Rockwell was a fast-talking "nut comic" who developed an act as a lecturing doctor, sometimes with a stethoscope and an oversized five-foot banana as props, billed as "Doc Rockwell - Quack! Quack! Quack!".

One sign of Rockwell's surprising success was his appearances as the headline act at the Palace Theater in New York, the single most coveted booking in vaudeville. Rockwell headlined at the Palace not once but six times, the first in April 1925, the last in May 1932.<span>[</span>1<span>]</span>

In the 1930s he also appeared on the inaugural bill at the Radio City Music Hall (on December 27, 1932),<span>[</span>2<span>]</span> at the Ziegfeld Theater, and in a single musical comedy film, 1937's The Singing Marine. In 1939 Rockwell had his own short-lived national radio show on NBC, and through the 1940s he was a frequent guest on the radio show of his friend Fred Allen.

He married fellow performer Claire Schade in 1915 in Bloomington, Illinois. Rockwell's first son was George Lincoln Rockwell, the founder of the American Nazi Party, whose views his father did not share.

For many years after his retirement from performing, Doc Rockwell contributed a humor column to Down East Magazine, published in his adopted state of Maine. He had the last page from shortly after the magazine's founding in 1954 to his death. Doc always ended his column with "Maker of fine cigar ashes since 1889."

Albert
From the Toledo News, Aug 20, 1930, the column titled

<strong>"This and That From the Radio World" </strong>

<strong>"A Column of Little Things of Interest That Have To Do With Broadcasting"</strong>

by Ted Magee.

In my previous posting I cited Lennie and Arthur as two pianists in the Camel Pleasure Hour. The column gives fascinating information about these two outstanding pianists.

***************************************

After each weekly broadcast of the Camel Pleasure Hour, the sponsors of the program receive numerous letters about the two-piano team that is one of the features of the hour.
Not long ago Leonard Hayton and Arthur Schutt were two young music students a New York University. [<em>Really? I don't think so. AH</em>] They did not know each other but after being thoroughly grounded in the musical classics, each separately took up the piano. Their individual playing won them positions with Paul Whiteman, Roger Kahn [<em>no Wolfe. AH</em>] and other famous leaders.
Just before the launching of the Camel Pleasure Hour this year, the two young pianists met [<em>Arthur was 27 and Lennie was 22. AH</em>] and shortly after were signed as a piano duo. Since their first performance in the Camel Pleasure Hour they have built up a reputation as one of the best teams on the air.
Hayton ans Schutt's next performance with the Camel Pleasure Hour will be Wednesday evening at 8:30from WJR and associated NBC stations. Mary McCoy and Bily Hughes, Reinald Werrenrath, Willard Robison, the Camel Quartet and Glee Club will be on the prgram.


The full program follows.

The Campbells Are Comin'
Girl Trouble
Sweetheart
The Free and Easy
I've Got It But I Don't Do Me No Good
I'm Doing That Thing
Spain - Tango
March of the Grenadiers
Just a Little Closer
How I Wish I Could Sing A Love Song
Soliloquy
Songs of Araby
Selections From Apple Blossoms
Down the River of Golden Dreams
Singin' In A Hammock
Yellow Dog Blues
Mary Lou
Fuzzy-Wuzzy

*******************************


Arthur and Lennie played Bix's "Candlelights" in the Camel Pleasure Hour broadcast of September 3, 1930, four days after Bix copyrighted his piano composition.

Albert

 
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