The Consistency of the Great Miff Mole

The Consistency of the Great Miff Mole

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 11th, 2010, 11:09 pm #1


Here are two juxtaposed solos by my favorite trombone player, Miff Mole.. First, his solo from <em>Ja-Da </em>in 1927 with the Arkansas Travellers and then his solo in 1929 from <em>How Come You Do Me Like You Do</em> with the Capitolians.

http://bixography.com/MoleSolosJaDaArkT ... aporch.ram

He was  superb, and consistency was his middle name. Miff added an extra dimension to all the recordings in which he participated.

Enjoy.

Albert

 
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

April 12th, 2010, 12:08 am #2

Thank you, Albert, for these passages. I especially liked the solo from "How Come You Do Me?"

I'm glad Bix recorded with both Jack Teagarden and Miff Mole--and Tommy Dorsey, too.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 12th, 2010, 2:44 am #3


.... Bill Rank!

Albert
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Glenda
Glenda

April 12th, 2010, 1:00 pm #4

Right! I didn't mean to slight Rank, whose unmistakable sound we hear throughout the Trumbauer and Whiteman recordings, by mentioning the others, only that Bix's chances to record with the other great trombonists of the period were rarer but no less choice.

I'm particularly fond of the 1930 recordings, which give us a chance to hear Bix and Teagarden--and sometimes Goodman--working together, as in the deliciously HOT second half of "Strut, Miss Lizzie," where Bix, Goodman, and Teagarden play off of each other (with breaks by Venuti and Leibrook), and that ending that gives me shivers everytime I hear it.
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Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

April 12th, 2010, 5:17 pm #5

Of the three titles from this 1930 Brunswick session, this one dates back to ODJB days. Bix gets the chance to return to his first love, that is, that "good time jazz" Dixieland style that first fascinated him as a 15 year old. And the ending? Yes, we too get those shivers you refer to, Glenda.
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Glenda
Glenda

April 12th, 2010, 6:35 pm #6

Dear Ken,

Thanks for letting me know that you especially enjoy this one. "Strut, Miss Lizzie" is not often mentioned by Bix fans. Somehow, on this and on other 1930s recordings, I hear something of a mature depth of feeling that is different and very moving.

Do you get the same shiver from the ending to "Georgia on My Mind?" To me that short closing nails the mood of the piece forevermore. It has a kind of sadness that is bluer than the blues, like a stifled sob.
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Ken Bristow
Ken Bristow

April 12th, 2010, 8:11 pm #7

Thanks, Glenda,
On the last session under his own name, I can hear in his playing on both takes of "I'll be a friend with pleasure" a melancholy feeling in his playing, the performance described in the LP sleeve notes as "an odd, sad performance". That's a very accurate description of these two takes.
On the "Georgia", session, the last one of all, perhaps he had a feeling, a premonition, that he only had a short time left on earth. Years later Teagarden tells of seeing an uncertain Bix in a corner of the studio before recording commenced, talking to his cornet and working the valves. Two bars before the end of "Georgia" Bix plays one slight uncertain "fluffed" note. That could be the sob you refer to, Glenda.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

April 12th, 2010, 11:47 pm #8

Dear Ken,

Thanks for letting me know that you especially enjoy this one. "Strut, Miss Lizzie" is not often mentioned by Bix fans. Somehow, on this and on other 1930s recordings, I hear something of a mature depth of feeling that is different and very moving.

Do you get the same shiver from the ending to "Georgia on My Mind?" To me that short closing nails the mood of the piece forevermore. It has a kind of sadness that is bluer than the blues, like a stifled sob.
.... composition by Hoagy Carmichael.

In his biography of Hoagy, Stardust Melody, The Life and Music of Hagy Carmichael," Richard Sudhalter does a detailed analysis of the tune. Here I will transcribe just a short piece,

<em>"Georgia On My Mind." recorded here for the first time [the recording of Bix and Hoagy], seems to underscore Hoagy's regret at not allocating a more prominent role to Beiderbecke. Following a Carmichael vocal, Ray Lodwig stattes the melody in a mute, "nanny-goat" vibrato very prominent. It's an anomaly, in that Venuti and Teagarden, following him, play brief but effective hot solos. Could this sixteen bars have been intended for Bix? As it is, he does the last eight bars of the final chorus, and does them beautifully, ending with a poignant little coda."</em>

Listen, even if you have listened to the recording several times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSKfkJUK ... &index=159

Albert

 
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

April 13th, 2010, 12:54 am #9

Thanks, Glenda,
On the last session under his own name, I can hear in his playing on both takes of "I'll be a friend with pleasure" a melancholy feeling in his playing, the performance described in the LP sleeve notes as "an odd, sad performance". That's a very accurate description of these two takes.
On the "Georgia", session, the last one of all, perhaps he had a feeling, a premonition, that he only had a short time left on earth. Years later Teagarden tells of seeing an uncertain Bix in a corner of the studio before recording commenced, talking to his cornet and working the valves. Two bars before the end of "Georgia" Bix plays one slight uncertain "fluffed" note. That could be the sob you refer to, Glenda.
Ken, that is exactly the color that gives that ending such meaning--that and the delicate final vibrato on the last note.

Carmichael said that since Bix seemed a bit down that day he didn't give him much to do on this song and that he later regretted that Bix didn't play more on "Georgia." But what he did play was what was needed, a distillation of that longing for what can never be again which is the essence of the song.
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Glenda
Glenda

April 13th, 2010, 12:56 am #10

.... composition by Hoagy Carmichael.

In his biography of Hoagy, Stardust Melody, The Life and Music of Hagy Carmichael," Richard Sudhalter does a detailed analysis of the tune. Here I will transcribe just a short piece,

<em>"Georgia On My Mind." recorded here for the first time [the recording of Bix and Hoagy], seems to underscore Hoagy's regret at not allocating a more prominent role to Beiderbecke. Following a Carmichael vocal, Ray Lodwig stattes the melody in a mute, "nanny-goat" vibrato very prominent. It's an anomaly, in that Venuti and Teagarden, following him, play brief but effective hot solos. Could this sixteen bars have been intended for Bix? As it is, he does the last eight bars of the final chorus, and does them beautifully, ending with a poignant little coda."</em>

Listen, even if you have listened to the recording several times.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YSKfkJUK ... &index=159

Albert

 
So true. This one bears listening to many times.
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