"Sweet Sue": an 11-page analysis!!!

"Sweet Sue": an 11-page analysis!!!

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 2nd, 2009, 3:36 pm #1

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><strong><em>Sweet Sue, Just You </em></strong>was recorded by Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra on Sep 18,<span>  </span>1928. It is a concert arrangement by Bill Challis for a 12-inch 78 rpm disc. Bix played a 32-bar chorus in hat. Don Rayno writes, The record comes to a climax when Bix unleashes an uptempo hot solo chorus, played into a hat, as specified by the arranger. That was exactly the way it was meant, said Challis. It was all built up to Bix taking that solo. According to Sudhalter and Evans, "Bix: Man and Legend", "On "Sweet Sue', made the same day, Bix playing his full-chorus solo, caught one of his fingers between valves and wound up playing nearly four bars with the first valve depressed, Jack Fulton said. This passage, toward the end of the solo, sounds characteristically unruffled, with no hint of anything amiss save in Bix's selection of notes playable with the cornet's first valve."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Only one take was issued, take 1 Col 50103-D <span> </span>(Joe Giordanos record signed by Bill Challis)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixography.com/images/sweetsuehans.jpg">
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">According to Donald Clarke,
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.donaldclarkemusicbox.com/ris ... l.php?c=10
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>In 1929 <em><span>Melody Maker</span></em> in Britain devoted eleven pages (good grief!!!) <span> </span>to an analysis of Challis's arrangement of 'Sweet Sue', composed the year before by Victor Young and Will Harris, but the paper attributed it wrongly to Ferde Grofé (as 'Singin' the Blues' was long attributed to Fud Livingston).</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Has anyone read this analysis?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
Last edited by ahaim on October 2nd, 2009, 3:37 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 3rd, 2009, 6:44 pm #2

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Through the generosity of Rob, here are the eleven pages of the Melody Maker review of Whiteman's Sweet Sue." Thanks, Rob. And David S, another generous forumite, offered to send me a copy of the review he had made for Bill Challis! I am deeply grateful to all forumites for their generosity in sharing documents and music with the Bixography Forum.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There is so much to write about "Sweet Sue," I dont know where to begin.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Maybe with a general evaluation of the tune (not specific recordings) by Alec Wilder form his excellent book "American Popular Songs, The Great Innovators, 1900-1950," Oxford University Press, 1972.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">"I should confess that I did not know until now that the music for 'Sweet Sue, Just You,' (1928) was by Victor Young. It's a very well-known song, one of those with relatively few notes, in this case sixty-one. The form is A-A-B-A.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The song is outstandingly simple. Here one has a repeated phrase, which is made of repeated notes, and a cadence. And then precisely<span>  </span>the same thing in the second A section. The release has a similar form for the first four bars so that the only real motion in the song is in the last four bars of the release, which, amazingly, consists of seven cs and two other notes, if one doesn't include the pick-up notes.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">This seems to me the most thin-ice skating imaginable. And yet it works, and all within the range of an octave. The fact that Victor Young was a superb orchestrator and so knew how to dress up simple melodies is beside the point, as 'Sweet Sue' worked with the public as a melody, unadorned."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Indeed, a very simple melody. See http://www.theguitarguy.com/sweetsue.htm <span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are dozens of recordings of the tune, in the US, in England, in Germany, sweet versions, hot versions, and of course, the concert version by Paul Whiteman. And versions where Bix's solo is copied nearly note for note. "Sweet Sue" is one of the examples in my lecture "Copying Bix."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Original Recording
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Copies
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Sune Lundwalls
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Palais Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Jimmie Grier and His
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Cocoanut Grove Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here are the three pieces in sequence.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/sweetsuesolo.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Lots of recordings by guys with connections with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Bing has a recording of "Sweet Sue" in which he scats in the manner of a Bix solo.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Joe Venuti's Blue Four have a recording of the tune. They are really five, with the great Joe Tarto on string bass. Although the two Joes made lots of recordings together, I believe "Sweet Sue" and "I've Found A New Baby" (both recorded on Nov 12, 1930) are the only recordings where Joe Tarto is one of Venuti's Blue Four or Five or Six.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/rama/VIC43541-5.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Charlie Straight also has a recording of the tune.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qx3gqBoGZW4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here is one recorded in Germany.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwl---er2O4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young was not only a terrific arranger but a superb composer. He wrote the soundtrack music for my all-time favorite western film, "Shane."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">I have not had a chance to digest al the material in the 11-page review (and a lot of it is beyond my knowledge of basic music theory). Just one comment for now. [I would listen to the recording as I read the analysis.]
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mr. Davison proposes that the guy playing celesta behind the vocal (by the way, the vocalist is Jack Fulton, not Skin Young) is Bix. Don Rayno tells us it is Lennie Hayton. Since a celesta in jazz records is often played by a pianist, clearly Bix would have been able to play the celesta behind Jack Fulton. But the musical creativity displayed in the celesta accompaniment is short of what I would have expected for Bix. Opinions?
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whiteman/sweetsue.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Read what Frank had to say about Bix catching his finger,
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1171838796
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">And get a load of this soundie.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJOkxzO6 ... re=related
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
Last edited by ahaim on October 3rd, 2009, 11:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

October 3rd, 2009, 11:03 pm #3

Hey Albert, you included everything about "Sweet Sue" EXCEPT the 11-page article!

Gotta read it...

-BK
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 3rd, 2009, 11:16 pm #4


Here is the potatoes

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html

I also added the link in my previous posting.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 4th, 2009, 2:43 pm #5

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Through the generosity of Rob, here are the eleven pages of the Melody Maker review of Whiteman's Sweet Sue." Thanks, Rob. And David S, another generous forumite, offered to send me a copy of the review he had made for Bill Challis! I am deeply grateful to all forumites for their generosity in sharing documents and music with the Bixography Forum.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There is so much to write about "Sweet Sue," I dont know where to begin.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Maybe with a general evaluation of the tune (not specific recordings) by Alec Wilder form his excellent book "American Popular Songs, The Great Innovators, 1900-1950," Oxford University Press, 1972.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">"I should confess that I did not know until now that the music for 'Sweet Sue, Just You,' (1928) was by Victor Young. It's a very well-known song, one of those with relatively few notes, in this case sixty-one. The form is A-A-B-A.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The song is outstandingly simple. Here one has a repeated phrase, which is made of repeated notes, and a cadence. And then precisely<span>  </span>the same thing in the second A section. The release has a similar form for the first four bars so that the only real motion in the song is in the last four bars of the release, which, amazingly, consists of seven cs and two other notes, if one doesn't include the pick-up notes.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">This seems to me the most thin-ice skating imaginable. And yet it works, and all within the range of an octave. The fact that Victor Young was a superb orchestrator and so knew how to dress up simple melodies is beside the point, as 'Sweet Sue' worked with the public as a melody, unadorned."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Indeed, a very simple melody. See http://www.theguitarguy.com/sweetsue.htm <span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are dozens of recordings of the tune, in the US, in England, in Germany, sweet versions, hot versions, and of course, the concert version by Paul Whiteman. And versions where Bix's solo is copied nearly note for note. "Sweet Sue" is one of the examples in my lecture "Copying Bix."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Original Recording
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Copies
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Sune Lundwalls
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Palais Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Jimmie Grier and His
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Cocoanut Grove Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here are the three pieces in sequence.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/sweetsuesolo.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Lots of recordings by guys with connections with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Bing has a recording of "Sweet Sue" in which he scats in the manner of a Bix solo.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Joe Venuti's Blue Four have a recording of the tune. They are really five, with the great Joe Tarto on string bass. Although the two Joes made lots of recordings together, I believe "Sweet Sue" and "I've Found A New Baby" (both recorded on Nov 12, 1930) are the only recordings where Joe Tarto is one of Venuti's Blue Four or Five or Six.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/rama/VIC43541-5.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Charlie Straight also has a recording of the tune.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qx3gqBoGZW4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here is one recorded in Germany.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwl---er2O4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young was not only a terrific arranger but a superb composer. He wrote the soundtrack music for my all-time favorite western film, "Shane."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">I have not had a chance to digest al the material in the 11-page review (and a lot of it is beyond my knowledge of basic music theory). Just one comment for now. [I would listen to the recording as I read the analysis.]
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mr. Davison proposes that the guy playing celesta behind the vocal (by the way, the vocalist is Jack Fulton, not Skin Young) is Bix. Don Rayno tells us it is Lennie Hayton. Since a celesta in jazz records is often played by a pianist, clearly Bix would have been able to play the celesta behind Jack Fulton. But the musical creativity displayed in the celesta accompaniment is short of what I would have expected for Bix. Opinions?
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whiteman/sweetsue.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Read what Frank had to say about Bix catching his finger,
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1171838796
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">And get a load of this soundie.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJOkxzO6 ... re=related
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
I added the two pages and corrected the links. Thanks, Rob

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html

So it was a 13-page review, not 11!!!

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on October 4th, 2009, 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 4th, 2009, 6:44 pm #6

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Through the generosity of Rob, here are the eleven pages of the Melody Maker review of Whiteman's Sweet Sue." Thanks, Rob. And David S, another generous forumite, offered to send me a copy of the review he had made for Bill Challis! I am deeply grateful to all forumites for their generosity in sharing documents and music with the Bixography Forum.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There is so much to write about "Sweet Sue," I dont know where to begin.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Maybe with a general evaluation of the tune (not specific recordings) by Alec Wilder form his excellent book "American Popular Songs, The Great Innovators, 1900-1950," Oxford University Press, 1972.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">"I should confess that I did not know until now that the music for 'Sweet Sue, Just You,' (1928) was by Victor Young. It's a very well-known song, one of those with relatively few notes, in this case sixty-one. The form is A-A-B-A.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The song is outstandingly simple. Here one has a repeated phrase, which is made of repeated notes, and a cadence. And then precisely<span>  </span>the same thing in the second A section. The release has a similar form for the first four bars so that the only real motion in the song is in the last four bars of the release, which, amazingly, consists of seven cs and two other notes, if one doesn't include the pick-up notes.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">This seems to me the most thin-ice skating imaginable. And yet it works, and all within the range of an octave. The fact that Victor Young was a superb orchestrator and so knew how to dress up simple melodies is beside the point, as 'Sweet Sue' worked with the public as a melody, unadorned."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Indeed, a very simple melody. See http://www.theguitarguy.com/sweetsue.htm <span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are dozens of recordings of the tune, in the US, in England, in Germany, sweet versions, hot versions, and of course, the concert version by Paul Whiteman. And versions where Bix's solo is copied nearly note for note. "Sweet Sue" is one of the examples in my lecture "Copying Bix."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Original Recording
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Paul Whiteman and His Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Copies
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Sune Lundwalls
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Palais Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Jimmie Grier and His
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Cocoanut Grove Orchestra
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here are the three pieces in sequence.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/sweetsuesolo.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Lots of recordings by guys with connections with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Bing has a recording of "Sweet Sue" in which he scats in the manner of a Bix solo.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Joe Venuti's Blue Four have a recording of the tune. They are really five, with the great Joe Tarto on string bass. Although the two Joes made lots of recordings together, I believe "Sweet Sue" and "I've Found A New Baby" (both recorded on Nov 12, 1930) are the only recordings where Joe Tarto is one of Venuti's Blue Four or Five or Six.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.jazz-on-line.com/a/rama/VIC43541-5.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Charlie Straight also has a recording of the tune.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qx3gqBoGZW4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Here is one recorded in Germany.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wwl---er2O4
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young was not only a terrific arranger but a superb composer. He wrote the soundtrack music for my all-time favorite western film, "Shane."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">I have not had a chance to digest al the material in the 11-page review (and a lot of it is beyond my knowledge of basic music theory). Just one comment for now. [I would listen to the recording as I read the analysis.]
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mr. Davison proposes that the guy playing celesta behind the vocal (by the way, the vocalist is Jack Fulton, not Skin Young) is Bix. Don Rayno tells us it is Lennie Hayton. Since a celesta in jazz records is often played by a pianist, clearly Bix would have been able to play the celesta behind Jack Fulton. But the musical creativity displayed in the celesta accompaniment is short of what I would have expected for Bix. Opinions?
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/whiteman/sweetsue.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Read what Frank had to say about Bix catching his finger,
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/message/1171838796
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">And get a load of this soundie.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nJOkxzO6 ... re=related
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The first major recording of <em>Star Dust </em>at a slow tempo (the Merry Makers recording was actually at a slower tempo, but was not a good seller) was that of Isham Jones and His Orchestra in May 1930. According to Sudhalter in his Carmichael biography, "Jones had heard <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />McKinney's Cotton Pickers play the song and spotted it at once as a potential hit. According to James Breley, soon to become Jone's manager, the leader went to work with his violinist Victor Young, rearranging <em>'Star Dust' </em>as a romantic ballad." Isham Jones recorded Star Dust in Chicago with Victor Young playing a violin solo. This recording in slow tempo and pensive mood represents a major break with the previous "hot" interpretations of the song.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Listen to the first few recordings of <em>Star Dust</em>. Note that Hoagy's recording is a "Stomp."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">(<em>Star Dust</em> is incorrectly translated as "Estrellitas." The correct translation is "Polvo de Estrellas.")
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Hoagy Carmichael and His Pals 10/31/1927
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/hoagy/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Chocolate Dandies (McKinneys Cotton Pickers) 10/13/1928 <span> </span><span> </span>Copied, or at least inspired by Hoagys version
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/chocolate/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mills Merry Makers 11/08/1929 (note the section at 1:45-1:60; has anyone heard this in other recordings of Star Dust?)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/StardustMerryMills.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Irving Mills and His Hotsy Totsy Gang <span> </span>09/20/1929 (Hoagy at the piano)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/mills/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Isham Jones and His Orchestra 05/16/1930
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/ishamjones/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are many connections of Victor Young with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Young was recording director (and played violin; he first studied violin in Warsaw) for Jean Goldkette in the summer 1929.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Several musicians who recorded with Bix were members of the Victor Young Orchestra: Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Joe Venuti, Joe Tarto, Chauncey Morehouse, etc.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Youngs orchestra accompanied Bing Crosby in several of his recordings
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young had 24 nominations for Academy Awards (music). He won it once for Around the World in Eighty Days.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young issued a bunch of 78s in 1939-1940 with music from The Wizard of Oz. Not soundtrack recordings, his own arrangements. I believe Judy Garland was in some of the recordings.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">You can watch the complete film "Swing High Swing Low" (music arrangers Victor Young and Phil Boutellje) with the exquisite Carole Lombard and the excellent actor (underrated in my opinion) Fred McMurray (who plays trumpet her; I thought he was a saxophone player) And a very young Anthony Quinn.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.archive.org/details/swinghi_swinglo
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
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Brad Kay
Brad Kay

October 4th, 2009, 7:22 pm #7

I added the two pages and corrected the links. Thanks, Rob

http://bixbeiderbecke.com/SweetSue/MMRe ... etSue.html

So it was a 13-page review, not 11!!!

Albert
This is the most extraordinary analysis of a record I've ever seen. Al Davison not only knows his stuff down to the last appogiatura, but clearly can see the forest for the trees.

Davison's explanation of the technical and musical details of the arrangement and Bix's solo is mouth-watering. I will be studying them for some time.

His appreciation of Bix is total, and needs no amendments from the future. In fact, each monthly article is cliffhanger, designed to whet our appetite for whatever he is going to say about Bix. Al even includes the transcription of the solo TWICE, if only to drive in the point about how great it is.

Most amazing is his summation of Bix, the musician, which I have to repeat verbatim, for I can't believe this was published in 1929:

There is no doubt that Bix is a born genius. There is probably no one in existence who has quite the same talent for transcribing a given melody in a manner that is at once rhythmical, tuneful, entertaining, novel, and in fact everything a hot solo should be. All his phrases are so delightfully constructed and hang together so well. They are never cheap and there is real musical merit in his work.

He has an extraordinary knack of hitting on notes which, though they seem very far from the more obvious ones which most of us would select in similar circumstances, generally end up showing the harmony not only clearly, but to its best advantage, as well as making a wonderful melody.

He can be humorous or sentimental. In fact, he switches about from one to the other so rapidly that you never quite know which way to take him. Probably he doesn't know himself, for it is a hundred to one that he has never analysed his work. He just does it because it's natural. He can't help it. It's just a great gift.


To use an erudite American expression: FUCKIN' UNBELIEVABLE! How is it that this wholly dead-on and detailed appreciation, published during Bix's lifetime, has never surfaced until now? Did Bix get to read it? If he did, why didn't he just move the hell to England and live large?

I thought the other nice contemporary writings about Bix in English record reviews was exceptional, but this puts them all in the shade. Even his last name is spelled correctly.

-Brad K
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 4th, 2009, 7:53 pm #8

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The first major recording of <em>Star Dust </em>at a slow tempo (the Merry Makers recording was actually at a slower tempo, but was not a good seller) was that of Isham Jones and His Orchestra in May 1930. According to Sudhalter in his Carmichael biography, "Jones had heard <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />McKinney's Cotton Pickers play the song and spotted it at once as a potential hit. According to James Breley, soon to become Jone's manager, the leader went to work with his violinist Victor Young, rearranging <em>'Star Dust' </em>as a romantic ballad." Isham Jones recorded Star Dust in Chicago with Victor Young playing a violin solo. This recording in slow tempo and pensive mood represents a major break with the previous "hot" interpretations of the song.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Listen to the first few recordings of <em>Star Dust</em>. Note that Hoagy's recording is a "Stomp."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">(<em>Star Dust</em> is incorrectly translated as "Estrellitas." The correct translation is "Polvo de Estrellas.")
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Hoagy Carmichael and His Pals 10/31/1927
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/hoagy/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Chocolate Dandies (McKinneys Cotton Pickers) 10/13/1928 <span> </span><span> </span>Copied, or at least inspired by Hoagys version
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/chocolate/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mills Merry Makers 11/08/1929 (note the section at 1:45-1:60; has anyone heard this in other recordings of Star Dust?)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/StardustMerryMills.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Irving Mills and His Hotsy Totsy Gang <span> </span>09/20/1929 (Hoagy at the piano)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/mills/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Isham Jones and His Orchestra 05/16/1930
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/ishamjones/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are many connections of Victor Young with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Young was recording director (and played violin; he first studied violin in Warsaw) for Jean Goldkette in the summer 1929.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Several musicians who recorded with Bix were members of the Victor Young Orchestra: Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Joe Venuti, Joe Tarto, Chauncey Morehouse, etc.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Youngs orchestra accompanied Bing Crosby in several of his recordings
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young had 24 nominations for Academy Awards (music). He won it once for Around the World in Eighty Days.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young issued a bunch of 78s in 1939-1940 with music from The Wizard of Oz. Not soundtrack recordings, his own arrangements. I believe Judy Garland was in some of the recordings.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">You can watch the complete film "Swing High Swing Low" (music arrangers Victor Young and Phil Boutellje) with the exquisite Carole Lombard and the excellent actor (underrated in my opinion) Fred McMurray (who plays trumpet her; I thought he was a saxophone player) And a very young Anthony Quinn.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.archive.org/details/swinghi_swinglo
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
.... plays the trumpet. I wonder who the trumpeteer is.

I just watched the movie. I noticed something of no interest at all to most people. The judge, who is supposed to be a Panamanina, speaks with an Argentinina accent.

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

October 4th, 2009, 8:37 pm #9

This is the most extraordinary analysis of a record I've ever seen. Al Davison not only knows his stuff down to the last appogiatura, but clearly can see the forest for the trees.

Davison's explanation of the technical and musical details of the arrangement and Bix's solo is mouth-watering. I will be studying them for some time.

His appreciation of Bix is total, and needs no amendments from the future. In fact, each monthly article is cliffhanger, designed to whet our appetite for whatever he is going to say about Bix. Al even includes the transcription of the solo TWICE, if only to drive in the point about how great it is.

Most amazing is his summation of Bix, the musician, which I have to repeat verbatim, for I can't believe this was published in 1929:

There is no doubt that Bix is a born genius. There is probably no one in existence who has quite the same talent for transcribing a given melody in a manner that is at once rhythmical, tuneful, entertaining, novel, and in fact everything a hot solo should be. All his phrases are so delightfully constructed and hang together so well. They are never cheap and there is real musical merit in his work.

He has an extraordinary knack of hitting on notes which, though they seem very far from the more obvious ones which most of us would select in similar circumstances, generally end up showing the harmony not only clearly, but to its best advantage, as well as making a wonderful melody.

He can be humorous or sentimental. In fact, he switches about from one to the other so rapidly that you never quite know which way to take him. Probably he doesn't know himself, for it is a hundred to one that he has never analysed his work. He just does it because it's natural. He can't help it. It's just a great gift.


To use an erudite American expression: FUCKIN' UNBELIEVABLE! How is it that this wholly dead-on and detailed appreciation, published during Bix's lifetime, has never surfaced until now? Did Bix get to read it? If he did, why didn't he just move the hell to England and live large?

I thought the other nice contemporary writings about Bix in English record reviews was exceptional, but this puts them all in the shade. Even his last name is spelled correctly.

-Brad K
.... <em>He has an extraordinary knack of hitting on notes which, though they seem very far from the more obvious ones which most of us would select in similar circumstances, generally end up showing the harmony not only clearly, but to its best advantage, as well as making a wonderful melody. </em>

Yeeessss! The notes that Bix chose were out of this world.

Albert
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

October 4th, 2009, 9:05 pm #10

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">The first major recording of <em>Star Dust </em>at a slow tempo (the Merry Makers recording was actually at a slower tempo, but was not a good seller) was that of Isham Jones and His Orchestra in May 1930. According to Sudhalter in his Carmichael biography, "Jones had heard <?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" />McKinney's Cotton Pickers play the song and spotted it at once as a potential hit. According to James Breley, soon to become Jone's manager, the leader went to work with his violinist Victor Young, rearranging <em>'Star Dust' </em>as a romantic ballad." Isham Jones recorded Star Dust in Chicago with Victor Young playing a violin solo. This recording in slow tempo and pensive mood represents a major break with the previous "hot" interpretations of the song.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Listen to the first few recordings of <em>Star Dust</em>. Note that Hoagy's recording is a "Stomp."
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">(<em>Star Dust</em> is incorrectly translated as "Estrellitas." The correct translation is "Polvo de Estrellas.")
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Hoagy Carmichael and His Pals 10/31/1927
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/hoagy/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Chocolate Dandies (McKinneys Cotton Pickers) 10/13/1928 <span> </span><span> </span>Copied, or at least inspired by Hoagys version
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/chocolate/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Mills Merry Makers 11/08/1929 (note the section at 1:45-1:60; has anyone heard this in other recordings of Star Dust?)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://bixography.com/StardustMerryMills.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Irving Mills and His Hotsy Totsy Gang <span> </span>09/20/1929 (Hoagy at the piano)
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/songs/mills/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Isham Jones and His Orchestra 05/16/1930
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.redhotjazz.com/Songs/ishamjones/stardust.ram
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">There are many connections of Victor Young with Bix.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Young was recording director (and played violin; he first studied violin in Warsaw) for Jean Goldkette in the summer 1929.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Several musicians who recorded with Bix were members of the Victor Young Orchestra: Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, Joe Venuti, Joe Tarto, Chauncey Morehouse, etc.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt .5in;text-indent:-.25in;"><span>-<span>         </span></span>Victor Youngs orchestra accompanied Bing Crosby in several of his recordings
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young had 24 nominations for Academy Awards (music). He won it once for Around the World in Eighty Days.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Victor Young issued a bunch of 78s in 1939-1940 with music from The Wizard of Oz. Not soundtrack recordings, his own arrangements. I believe Judy Garland was in some of the recordings.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">You can watch the complete film "Swing High Swing Low" (music arrangers Victor Young and Phil Boutellje) with the exquisite Carole Lombard and the excellent actor (underrated in my opinion) Fred McMurray (who plays trumpet her; I thought he was a saxophone player) And a very young Anthony Quinn.
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">http://www.archive.org/details/swinghi_swinglo
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;">Albert
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"> 
...and there's also Ambrose's lovely version of early 1931, with both Hooley and Joe Crossman in fine form. I think I sent you an mp3 of this a while ago, but if I didn't just let me know.

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