Superb "New" Review of Terry Teachout's "Satchmo"

Superb "New" Review of Terry Teachout's "Satchmo"

Richard Iaconelli
Richard Iaconelli

July 26th, 2012, 4:06 pm #1

I just came across a remarkably in-depth new review of Terry Teachout's fairly recent book on Louis Armstrong by Michael Cogswell. It's in the Journal of Jazz Studies, Vol 8 No 1 Spring 2012. Well worth reading for any old jazz fan.

The entire essay can be reached in PDF format thru a link at Terry Teachout's "About Last Night" blog.

I'm not sure about copyright, or I'd post the whole thing here.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 26th, 2012, 6:52 pm #2

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Richard Iaconelli
Richard Iaconelli

July 27th, 2012, 12:56 pm #3

Thank you Albert for the Journal site posting. If you go down to Vol 7, No 1, on that page you will click on
a Randy Sandke book review on great trumpeters. Some interesting comments on Bix.
An excerpt below.


...his (Bix) genius must be consistently downplayed.
According to Gabbard, Bix's playing is not sensational, has no swagger, and
lacks the grand, dramatic gestures of black artists. But the cornetistas revealed
in his classic recordings of Somebody Stole My Gal, Goose Pimples, and Frank
Trumbauers version of Riverboat Shuffle, to name but a few examplesis not
only grandly dramatic and sensational, but resounding with swagger (as well as that
much undervalued commodity in todays artistic market: subtlety). The author even
claims that during his short life he was never much of a success, ignoring the fact
that Bix at the peak of his career was prominently featured with the most famous
and highest-paying musical organization of his time. Though Beiderbecke spent the
bulk of his career playing for dances and later in theaters, Gabbard says audiences
at clubs surely kept right on talking and drinking when he soloedagain utter, and
in my opinion, uninformed speculation.
Beiderbecke intentionally avoided the trumpet, preferring the mellower sound of
the cornet, but Gabbard consistently (and annoyingly) refers to him as a trumpeter.
And Beiderbeckes first recordings were from February, 1924, not 1925 as Gabbard
states. These recordings feature fully improvised solos even before Armstrong had a...
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 27th, 2012, 1:58 pm #4


.... <span><em>Hotter Than That: The Trumpet, Jazz, and American Culture</em> by Krin Gabbard, Randy asked me if I knew Gabbard. It turns out that Gabbard is a faculty member in the department of Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies at Stony Brook. I never met Gabbard. We exchanged a couple of mail messages a decade ago.</span>

<span>Albert</span>
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