Sugar Foot Blues (Stomp)/Dippermouth Blues/

Sugar Foot Blues (Stomp)/Dippermouth Blues/

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 4:49 pm #1

Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask.

http://www.sandybrownjazz.co.uk/TracksU ... Blues.html

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 5:06 pm #2

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

February 14th, 2018, 5:07 pm #3

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Fred
Fred

February 15th, 2018, 1:53 am #4

Everything you wanted to know but were afraid to ask.

http://www.sandybrownjazz.co.uk/TracksU ... Blues.html

Albert
Greetings Mr. Haim,

From Sandy Brown Jazz' Tracks Unwrapped, "...with Billie Holiday’s dad, Clarence, keeping it all glued together with guitar. The effect is rollicking and wonderfully crunk'...."

In other jazz documentary printed-page, I've read relationship suggested between Henderson-player Clarence & singer Billie Holiday... "maybe an uncle" Hazen Schumacher opined in uncertain voice, on one of his radio shows, I recall vaguely. Contrast this, though, with other ready reference on Billie Holiday -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Billie_Holiday
"Eleanora Fagan (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), better known as Billie Holiday, was an American jazz musician and singer-songwriter with a...." Possibly comedian Billy Crystal could elucidate here. Through his uncle Milt Gabler of NYC's Jazz Man Record Shop, Crystal remembers personally some of these names, from his youth.

Again via Brown, and also Urban Dictionary: There are many mentions of southern field labor in the old vocal blues recordings, and cotton & sugar cane in particular (Sugar Cane was also a Joplin rag title). Sugar cane stalk harvesting, division of labor - cutters swing machettis, and others pick up/gather, out in the harvest field. I've supposed this might be much of the title-word's origin.

And in the Henderson record title... Northern urban poking fun at southern rural, possibly? Henderson, Redman et al, in contrast with Mississippi Delta guys.
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Fred
Fred

February 15th, 2018, 3:53 am #5

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Fred
Fred

February 15th, 2018, 3:57 am #6

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Fred
Fred

February 15th, 2018, 3:59 am #7

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Fred
Fred

February 15th, 2018, 4:04 am #8

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Fred From Iowa
Fred From Iowa

February 15th, 2018, 4:14 am #9

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James E.Parten
James E.Parten

February 15th, 2018, 3:34 pm #10

As bass sax can be heard behind and adjacent to two-saxophone passages, then it is clear that Coleman Hawkins is not playing the bass sax, but is playing tenor sax alongside Don Redman's alto.

More likely it is Billy (also given as Billie) Fowler, who plays bass sax on a number of Fletcher Henderson records made that year.
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