Paul Whiteman in a Lambert and Butler Cigarette Card.

Paul Whiteman in a Lambert and Butler Cigarette Card.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 25th, 2012, 3:04 pm #1


Charles Lambert and Charles Butler started manufacturing cigars and cigarettes in 1836. The company produced its first set of cigarette cards in 1898. Paul Whiteman is one of 25 in their set of Band Leaders.
Name Of Set: Dance Band LeadersManufacturer: Lambert and ButlerIssue Year: 1936Card Number: 25Card Titles: Ambrose, Cab Calloway, Billy Cotton, Duke Ellington, Roy Fox, Geraldo, Carroll Gibbons, Nat Gonella, Henry Hall, Jack Hylton, Jack Jackson, Charlie Kunz, Sydney Kyte, Brian Lawrence, Syd Lipton, Joe Loss, Ray Noble, Jack Payne, Lou Preager, Harry Roy, Debroy Somers, Lew Stone , Rudy Vallee, Paul Whiteman, and Maurice Winnick.
Here are 20 of them, mostly British musicians.



Among the five missing is Paul Whiteman.



Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 25th, 2012, 3:38 pm #2


.... of <em>My Canary Has Circles Under His Eyes.</em>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FXdI2rUbsM

I like the vocalist, Dan Donovan, very much and the powerful ensemble work of the band.

My question and the reason for this posting: What is the instrument heard briefly at 2:35-2:37, a bassoon?

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on August 25th, 2012, 3:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 25th, 2012, 6:15 pm #3

Charles Lambert and Charles Butler started manufacturing cigars and cigarettes in 1836. The company produced its first set of cigarette cards in 1898. Paul Whiteman is one of 25 in their set of Band Leaders.
Name Of Set: Dance Band LeadersManufacturer: Lambert and ButlerIssue Year: 1936Card Number: 25Card Titles: Ambrose, Cab Calloway, Billy Cotton, Duke Ellington, Roy Fox, Geraldo, Carroll Gibbons, Nat Gonella, Henry Hall, Jack Hylton, Jack Jackson, Charlie Kunz, Sydney Kyte, Brian Lawrence, Syd Lipton, Joe Loss, Ray Noble, Jack Payne, Lou Preager, Harry Roy, Debroy Somers, Lew Stone , Rudy Vallee, Paul Whiteman, and Maurice Winnick.
Here are 20 of them, mostly British musicians.



Among the five missing is Paul Whiteman.



Albert
When the Goldkette band disbanded in the Fall of 1927, Steve Brown joined the Whiteman organization. Bix and Tram followed a few weeks later.

On Jan 24, 1928, the Whiteman concert orchestra recorded the Rodgers and Hart tune <em>My Heart Stood Still</em>. This was issued on a 12-inch Victor disc, Vic 35883. 



A very interesting arangement by Bill Challis: first a slow, romantic section with a vocal by the Sweet Trio with Al Rinker added, then a hot section with a spectacular duet with Tram improvising a 32-bar solo and Brown slapping the bass.  Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSTAw4iN580

We always think of Margulis as the perfect player, no errors. However, read what Don Rayno writes about this recording, "Challis originally intended for Margulis to play the entire eight-bar closing, but he fluffed the high F during rehearsals, prompting Whiteman to give the last four bars to Hazlett to play on his E-flat clarinet. Apparently, Whiteman changed his mind again when it came time to record the arrangement, for it is Rube Crozier who takes the ending on his flute, per Whiteman's red-pencil instructions on the score."

<em>My Heart Stood Still</em> is one of the songs in the production of <em>A Connecticut Yankee</em>, Vanderbilt Theater, 11/3/1927-10/27/1928. Another of the songs in the production was <em>Thou Swell.</em>
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

August 25th, 2012, 7:27 pm #4

.... of <em>My Canary Has Circles Under His Eyes.</em>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FXdI2rUbsM

I like the vocalist, Dan Donovan, very much and the powerful ensemble work of the band.

My question and the reason for this posting: What is the instrument heard briefly at 2:35-2:37, a bassoon?

Albert
Indeed, it's a bassoon.

Below is a link to another nice version of this song, by Elsie Carlisle, Britain's answer to Ethel Bingham! The pianist, Harry Rubens, has occasional modernistic flashes...those passages at 0.39-0.42 and 1.47-1.51 would surely have made Bix smile!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyxMrdOt ... re=related

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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 25th, 2012, 8:57 pm #5


I love how she uses her eyes to emphasize her singing.

The lyrics from http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs ... eyes.shtml

MY CANARY HAS CIRCLES UNDER HIS EYES
(Ted Kohler / Eddie Pola / Jack Golden)

Debroy Summers & His Orch. - 1930
Sophie Tucker - 1931
Marion Harris - 1931
Al Bowlly with The Waldorfians - 1931
Lawrence Welk's Novelty Orch. - 1931
Karl Denver - 1963
Captain Matchbox Whoopee Band - 1973
George Melly - 1976

Also recorded by:
Don Neely's Royal Society Jazz Orchestra;
The Royal Pasadena Roof Orchestra; Elsie Carlisle.



Mister Press Man, here's some news
You can print it if you choose
Just to show that times have changed a lot
Though it may sound strange to you
It is absolutely true
You can believe it.......or not

Since making whoopee became all the rage
It's even got into the old birdcage
My canary has circles under his eyes

He used to whistle 'The Prisoner's Song'
Now he does snake-hips the whole day long
My canary has circles under his eyes

His only pals are the Meadow Lark
And just a tiny sparrow
But I am afraid when he's in the park
He leaves the straight and narrow

I raised this bird in a manner so strict
Now I feel certain I'm being tricked
My canary has circles under his eyes

(Musical Interlude)

His only pals are the Meadow Lark
And just a tiny sparrow
But I am afraid when he's in the park
He leaves the straight and narrow

I raised this bird in a manner so strict
Now I feel certain I'm being tricked
My canary has circles under his eyes

My canary has circles under his eyes



(Transcribed by Mel Priddle - October 2002)



Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 25th, 2012, 9:55 pm #6

.... of <em>My Canary Has Circles Under His Eyes.</em>

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-FXdI2rUbsM

I like the vocalist, Dan Donovan, very much and the powerful ensemble work of the band.

My question and the reason for this posting: What is the instrument heard briefly at 2:35-2:37, a bassoon?

Albert
Here is the intial posting to one of the most interesting threads.

http://www.network54.com/Forum/27140/me ... 298053590/

For additional postings, search under <em>bassoon.</em>

Albert
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Rob Rothberg
Rob Rothberg

August 25th, 2012, 11:32 pm #7

Indeed, it's a bassoon.

Below is a link to another nice version of this song, by Elsie Carlisle, Britain's answer to Ethel Bingham! The pianist, Harry Rubens, has occasional modernistic flashes...those passages at 0.39-0.42 and 1.47-1.51 would surely have made Bix smile!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uyxMrdOt ... re=related
Here's a nice version of the tune by Lawrence Welk:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9uXuY3A_SI

Isn't that a Gennett record on his accordion?
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Frank van Nus
Frank van Nus

August 26th, 2012, 1:12 am #8

When the Goldkette band disbanded in the Fall of 1927, Steve Brown joined the Whiteman organization. Bix and Tram followed a few weeks later.

On Jan 24, 1928, the Whiteman concert orchestra recorded the Rodgers and Hart tune <em>My Heart Stood Still</em>. This was issued on a 12-inch Victor disc, Vic 35883. 



A very interesting arangement by Bill Challis: first a slow, romantic section with a vocal by the Sweet Trio with Al Rinker added, then a hot section with a spectacular duet with Tram improvising a 32-bar solo and Brown slapping the bass.  Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSTAw4iN580

We always think of Margulis as the perfect player, no errors. However, read what Don Rayno writes about this recording, "Challis originally intended for Margulis to play the entire eight-bar closing, but he fluffed the high F during rehearsals, prompting Whiteman to give the last four bars to Hazlett to play on his E-flat clarinet. Apparently, Whiteman changed his mind again when it came time to record the arrangement, for it is Rube Crozier who takes the ending on his flute, per Whiteman's red-pencil instructions on the score."

<em>My Heart Stood Still</em> is one of the songs in the production of <em>A Connecticut Yankee</em>, Vanderbilt Theater, 11/3/1927-10/27/1928. Another of the songs in the production was <em>Thou Swell.</em>
In despite of the instructions in the score which Rayno found, I am sure this fateful phrase is not played on a flute; it is most definitely a clarinet - probably an E-flat clarinet judging by the timbre, and judging by the attack and vibrato it was played by Chet Hazlett. Also, although the 1928-'30 Whiteman recordings prove that Rube Crozier, Red Maier, Bernie Daly and Hal McLean were all first-rate flutists, I suspect none of them could have managed that whole-tone glissando from B-flat to C, the 5th and 6th note in the phrase, on flute.

They certainly were good doublers though. Most if not all flute doubling in the 1920s sounds shrill and out-of-tune, but not with Whiteman in 1928-'30. Take a look the My Ohio Home film clip: Crozier and Maier can be seen switching to flutes at about 50 seconds into the arrangement (after playing the modulation on tenor sax and cor anglais respectively) and they sound absolutely fine, teaming up with Charlie Strickfaden on clarinet.

My favourite flute feature, incidentally, has to Waiting At The End Of The Road, where Grofé has two flutes quoting Dvorak's New World Symphony's "Largo" theme. Not only arranged to full effect, but also very well-executed. Maier and Daly's flutes are perfectly in tune and their timbre is clear as glass.

Possibly of interest to some: thanks to Don Rayno's meticulous research (let's all buy his up-coming new Whiteman book!), we know that Grofé intended the aforementioned passage in My Ohio Home to feature Hazlett's sub-tone clarinet. Yet, in the film clip, he can be heard playing his solo on alto sax. I'm presuming this was a miking issue; from where Hazlett was sitting, his sub-tone clarinet would simply not have registered. Which begs the question: did Hazlett ever play sub-tone clarinet "live" in Whiteman's early band arrangements? Or was it mainly a studio microphone feature?

Frank
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

August 26th, 2012, 12:53 pm #9

I love how she uses her eyes to emphasize her singing.

The lyrics from http://lyricsplayground.com/alpha/songs ... eyes.shtml

MY CANARY HAS CIRCLES UNDER HIS EYES
(Ted Kohler / Eddie Pola / Jack Golden)

Debroy Summers & His Orch. - 1930
Sophie Tucker - 1931
Marion Harris - 1931
Al Bowlly with The Waldorfians - 1931
Lawrence Welk's Novelty Orch. - 1931
Karl Denver - 1963
Captain Matchbox Whoopee Band - 1973
George Melly - 1976

Also recorded by:
Don Neely's Royal Society Jazz Orchestra;
The Royal Pasadena Roof Orchestra; Elsie Carlisle.



Mister Press Man, here's some news
You can print it if you choose
Just to show that times have changed a lot
Though it may sound strange to you
It is absolutely true
You can believe it.......or not

Since making whoopee became all the rage
It's even got into the old birdcage
My canary has circles under his eyes

He used to whistle 'The Prisoner's Song'
Now he does snake-hips the whole day long
My canary has circles under his eyes

His only pals are the Meadow Lark
And just a tiny sparrow
But I am afraid when he's in the park
He leaves the straight and narrow

I raised this bird in a manner so strict
Now I feel certain I'm being tricked
My canary has circles under his eyes

(Musical Interlude)

His only pals are the Meadow Lark
And just a tiny sparrow
But I am afraid when he's in the park
He leaves the straight and narrow

I raised this bird in a manner so strict
Now I feel certain I'm being tricked
My canary has circles under his eyes

My canary has circles under his eyes



(Transcribed by Mel Priddle - October 2002)



Albert
Elsie's performance and expressions immediately reminded me of Gracie Allen.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

August 26th, 2012, 1:27 pm #10

Here's a nice version of the tune by Lawrence Welk:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9uXuY3A_SI

Isn't that a Gennett record on his accordion?
According to Rust (Dance Bands), Welk recorded (successfully) the following sides for Gennett

Richmond, IN, Nov 16, 1928
Spiked Beer Gnt 6712

Spiked Beer Gnt 20341
Shanghai Honey Moon Gnt 20341

Richmond, IN Nov 17, 1928
Doing the New Lowdown Gnt 6697

These were the two first recording sessions for Welk. <em>My Canary</em>, recorded in Grafton WI in April-May 1931 on was issued on Lyric 3370.

Here is <em>Spiked Beer</em>,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u66wBebZQ3Y

Not too shabby. The trumpet player knew about Bix.

The flipside of <em>Doing the New Low Down </em>is <em>Sweethearts on Parade </em>by Pat Dollohan (spelled with an "o" in the 78 online disco; it should be Dollahan), who recorded <em>My Suppressed Desire</em> (adjacent Gennett 6711) with the highly Bixian trumpet player William "Bolivar" Teninty.

The record label



The sheet music



The recording

http://redhotjazz.com/Songs/misc/mysuppresseddesire.ra

I love that tune. Coon Sanders also have a good recording.

Albert
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