One of the earliest mentions of Red Nichols in the press.

One of the earliest mentions of Red Nichols in the press.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2012, 2:42 pm #1


From the Ogden Standard Examiner, Sep 24, 1921.
[size=300]<font size="7" face="Arial">[/size]</font><p align="left"><strong><font size="7" face="geneva,arial,sans-serif">DANCE </font>TONIGHT</strong>
[size=300]<font size="7" face="Arial">[/size]</font><p align="left"><strong>White </strong><strong>City</strong>
<p align="left">Up the hill, east of Ogden Theatre. Come up and hear
<p align="left">Jack Bowring and "Slim" Fleming play the double pianos.
<p align="left">Radnoff Conshafter, the violinist,
<p align="left">"Mud" Watkins' laughing trombone,
<p align="left">"Red" Nichols' talking cornet,
<p align="left">Vic Thomas, the banjo kid,
<p align="left">"Butch" and "Prep" Watkins' sizzling saxophones
<p align="left">and "Judy" Bingham on drums.
<p align="left">TEN-PIECE ORCHESTRA
<p align="left">Admission Only 30c
<p align="left">Dancing every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Nights.
<p align="left">*************************
<p align="left">I only count nine: two pianists, two saxes, trombone, cornet, banjo, drums, violin. No bass?
<p align="left">Albert
Last edited by ahaim on July 13th, 2012, 2:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2012, 3:01 pm #2

<font size="4" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">From the Ogden Standard Examiner, Feb 2, 1914.
<p align="left"><strong>FAME BEING WON BY 'RED' NICHOLS</strong>
<font size="1" face="Times New Roman"></font><p align="left">Loring (Red) Nichols, son
<font face="Times New Roman">of E. W. Nichols,  former Ogden</font><p align="left">bandmaster, has reached the top rungs of the musical ladder,
<p align="left">
<font face="Times New Roman">acording to information received here from New York city. </font><p align="left"><font face="Times New Roman">The anouncementsays:</font>
<p align="left">Red Nichols, featured cornet with  Ross Gorman's orchestra in
<p align="left">Earl Carroll's Vanities and Club Lido, <font face="Times New Roman">New York. </font><font face="Times New Roman">Red makes records.</font>
<p align="left">for the leading phonograph companies with the 'Red- Heads.
<p align="left">He <font face="Times New Roman"></font><font face="Times New Roman">was with the "California.Ramblers" and other leading dance </font>
<p align="left"><font face="Times New Roman">orchestras.</font>
<p align="left">Young Nichols is a native of Ogden and was known as an excellent
<p align="left">musician.  His last engagement here, beIore leaving for the east,
<p align="left">was with Olie Reeve's dance orhestra.
<p align="left">Nichols.is playing cornet opposite.Miff<font face="Times New Roman">.Mole noted saxophone</font>
<p align="left">and trombone dance orchestra player. He <font size="1" face="Times New Roman"><font size="3">is writing several</font></font>
<p align="left">new choruses every month for dance music.
<p align="left">************************
<p align="left">Two observations. 1. Jazz is never mentioned; only "dance bands." 2. Miff saxophonist!!!!!!
<p align="left">Albert
Last edited by ahaim on July 13th, 2012, 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Mike O
Mike O

July 13th, 2012, 5:29 pm #3

You did mean to type 1924, didn't you?
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2012, 5:49 pm #4


Thanks for the correction, Mike. I incorrectly used the day (14) for the Year (1914). The article is from 1926.

Albert

A forum reader from the Netherlands sent in a query about the date. Thanks to him, too!
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2012, 7:10 pm #5

From the Ogden Standard Examiner, Sep 24, 1921.
[size=300]<font size="7" face="Arial">[/size]</font><p align="left"><strong><font size="7" face="geneva,arial,sans-serif">DANCE </font>TONIGHT</strong>
[size=300]<font size="7" face="Arial">[/size]</font><p align="left"><strong>White </strong><strong>City</strong>
<p align="left">Up the hill, east of Ogden Theatre. Come up and hear
<p align="left">Jack Bowring and "Slim" Fleming play the double pianos.
<p align="left">Radnoff Conshafter, the violinist,
<p align="left">"Mud" Watkins' laughing trombone,
<p align="left">"Red" Nichols' talking cornet,
<p align="left">Vic Thomas, the banjo kid,
<p align="left">"Butch" and "Prep" Watkins' sizzling saxophones
<p align="left">and "Judy" Bingham on drums.
<p align="left">TEN-PIECE ORCHESTRA
<p align="left">Admission Only 30c
<p align="left">Dancing every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday Nights.
<p align="left">*************************
<p align="left">I only count nine: two pianists, two saxes, trombone, cornet, banjo, drums, violin. No bass?
<p align="left">Albert
As far as I know, Red Nichols never went to England. However, in early 1925, the management of the Savoy Hotel (home of the Savoy Orpheans), was interested in hiring Red Nichols.

Thanks to the generosity of Nick, here is a letter he found in the Savoy Hotel's archives.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixography.com/RedNicholsLetterSavoyHotel.jpg">
<div>Nick writes: <em>Obviously, the request that this letter pertains to came to nothing, but it's fascinating none-the-less to consider that Nichols was already generating interest from the other side of the Atlantic as early as January 1925. Imagine how the Savoy Orpheans would have sounded with Nichols in its brass ranks!</em></div><div><em></em> </div><div>By the end of 1924, Red Nichols had participated in about two dozen recording sessions with Sam Lanin, George Olsen, and others. Was Red so famous by Jan 1925, that the management of the Savoy Hotel had heard about him and was preparing to hire him? Evidently, he was, or perhaps the American born Starita brothers, members of the Savoy Orpheans in 1923-1924 (Nick, please check if this is correct), had heard about Red and recommended him to the management as a young, upcoming musician?</div><div> </div><div>One of the world's legendary great hotels, The Savoy, opened in 1889, has played host to royalty, world leaders and legends of the stage and screen.  </div><div> </div><div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Savoy ... </div><div></div><div> </div><div>George Gershwin played the premiere of <em>Rhapsody in Blue</em> in Great Britain on June 15, 1925 at the Savoy Hotel.</div><div> </div><div>Albert</div>
Last edited by ahaim on July 13th, 2012, 7:11 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 13th, 2012, 7:20 pm #6


Nick provides the following information.

<em>"R Temple" is <span class="yshortcuts">Richard Temple</span>, the Savoy Hotel's publicity manager at the time. He was related to the more famous Richard Temple, actor with the D'Oyly Carte Opera company. It was the profits accrued from Richard D'Oyly Carte's productions of the Gilbert and Sullivan operettas that financed the building of the Savoy Hotel in 1889.</em>
<div><em>"M Thornewill" is Miles Thornewill, a director at the Savoy Hotel.</em></div><div><em></em> </div><div><em>Thank you, Nick.</em></div><div> </div><div>Albert</div><div class="yiv1609643906HOEnZb"><div class="yiv1609643906h5"><div> </div></div></div>
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Nick Dellow
Nick Dellow

July 13th, 2012, 7:32 pm #7

As far as I know, Red Nichols never went to England. However, in early 1925, the management of the Savoy Hotel (home of the Savoy Orpheans), was interested in hiring Red Nichols.

Thanks to the generosity of Nick, here is a letter he found in the Savoy Hotel's archives.

<img alt="[linked image]" src="http://bixography.com/RedNicholsLetterSavoyHotel.jpg">
<div>Nick writes: <em>Obviously, the request that this letter pertains to came to nothing, but it's fascinating none-the-less to consider that Nichols was already generating interest from the other side of the Atlantic as early as January 1925. Imagine how the Savoy Orpheans would have sounded with Nichols in its brass ranks!</em></div><div><em></em> </div><div>By the end of 1924, Red Nichols had participated in about two dozen recording sessions with Sam Lanin, George Olsen, and others. Was Red so famous by Jan 1925, that the management of the Savoy Hotel had heard about him and was preparing to hire him? Evidently, he was, or perhaps the American born Starita brothers, members of the Savoy Orpheans in 1923-1924 (Nick, please check if this is correct), had heard about Red and recommended him to the management as a young, upcoming musician?</div><div> </div><div>One of the world's legendary great hotels, The Savoy, opened in 1889, has played host to royalty, world leaders and legends of the stage and screen.  </div><div> </div><div><a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Savoy ... </div><div></div><div> </div><div>George Gershwin played the premiere of <em>Rhapsody in Blue</em> in Great Britain on June 15, 1925 at the Savoy Hotel.</div><div> </div><div>Albert</div>
Yes, indeed, the Starita brothers were in the Savoy Orpheans from October 1923 until 1925 (Al left in April 1925 and Ray in September that year).

When George Gershwin played his "Rhapsody In Blue" at the hotel on 15th June 1925 he was accompanied by the 30-piece Augmented Savoy Orpheans, with the performance relayed by the BBC via its 2LO studios (situated next to the Savoy Hotel on Savoy Hill) to listeners across the country and beyond. On the night, Billy Thorburn, the Savoy Orpheans' pianist, nervously stood by in case Gershwin didn't show up and he almost didn't! With only a few minutes to go before the broadcast, Gershwin couldn't be located, but was suddenly spotted at the back of the ballroom nonchalantly talking to a young lady. William De Mornys (the manager and virtual owner of the Savoy Orpheans and the Savoy Havana Band) recalled "We grabbed him just in time".

Here is a review of the broadcast, which appeared in the Westminster Gazette the next morning (16th June). The writer was obviously impressed by Gershwin's Rhapsody!:-

"Music that might have been danced to by blood-mad Red Indians, or wild Hungarian gypsies, music that surged like waves of elemental passion in great glissandos, that raged from shrieks of disembodied spirits to the croon of waves lapping the shores of moonlight lagoons, with one climax that crashed like the union of all the destructive forces of the universe - such was the amazing mixture that was presented to London last night at the Savoy Hotel by the combined Orpheans and Havana Jazz-bands, under the title of 'Rhapsody in Blue.' It was never the same thing for two consecutive minutes. It was Arnold Bax, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Irving Berlin by turns. Chopin was there, too, with a dozen other musical idioms. The Rhapsody in Blue' will find a place in musical history."
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Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

July 14th, 2012, 12:11 am #8

Thank you, Nick, for all your very helpful information, most particularly that review of George Gershwin's performance of "Rhapsody in Blue." The reviewer's prose waxed a bit florid, but he really nailed the truth of it in that final sentence.
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

July 14th, 2012, 11:21 pm #9

Yes, indeed, the Starita brothers were in the Savoy Orpheans from October 1923 until 1925 (Al left in April 1925 and Ray in September that year).

When George Gershwin played his "Rhapsody In Blue" at the hotel on 15th June 1925 he was accompanied by the 30-piece Augmented Savoy Orpheans, with the performance relayed by the BBC via its 2LO studios (situated next to the Savoy Hotel on Savoy Hill) to listeners across the country and beyond. On the night, Billy Thorburn, the Savoy Orpheans' pianist, nervously stood by in case Gershwin didn't show up and he almost didn't! With only a few minutes to go before the broadcast, Gershwin couldn't be located, but was suddenly spotted at the back of the ballroom nonchalantly talking to a young lady. William De Mornys (the manager and virtual owner of the Savoy Orpheans and the Savoy Havana Band) recalled "We grabbed him just in time".

Here is a review of the broadcast, which appeared in the Westminster Gazette the next morning (16th June). The writer was obviously impressed by Gershwin's Rhapsody!:-

"Music that might have been danced to by blood-mad Red Indians, or wild Hungarian gypsies, music that surged like waves of elemental passion in great glissandos, that raged from shrieks of disembodied spirits to the croon of waves lapping the shores of moonlight lagoons, with one climax that crashed like the union of all the destructive forces of the universe - such was the amazing mixture that was presented to London last night at the Savoy Hotel by the combined Orpheans and Havana Jazz-bands, under the title of 'Rhapsody in Blue.' It was never the same thing for two consecutive minutes. It was Arnold Bax, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Irving Berlin by turns. Chopin was there, too, with a dozen other musical idioms. The Rhapsody in Blue' will find a place in musical history."
Ferde Grofe donated his 1924 orchestration of <em>Rhapsody in Blue </em>to the Library of Congress. Here is an account from the LOC website.

<em>On July 1, 1946, the Library of Congress was privileged to extend a welcome to the distinguished composer and conductor, Ferde Grofé. His appearance at the Library would have been notable on any occasion, but it was remarkably so on this one, for he brought with him as a gift to the Library his original manuscript of George Gershwin's famous Rhapsody in Blue, an epoch-marking work in the annals of American music.</em>

<em>The first public performance of the celebrated Rhapsody occurred at Aeolian Hall, New York, on February 12, 1924. Gershwin played the solo piano part with Paul Whiteman's orchestra (Whiteman conducting) supplying the accompaniment as it had been scored by Grofé. The printed program of the concert bore the legend "An experiment in modern music," and it was aptly named. Although the occasion was not the first time that jazz music had been heard in the sacred precincts of polite concert halls, it was quite unprecedented with regard to scope, careful planning, and seriousness of purpose. The success of the venture was sensational; its effect was permanent. And much of the influence of jazz music on "art" music dates back to that concert.</em>

<em>The brightest feature of the program was undoubtedly Gershwin's Rhapsody. The composer was far from unknown before the event, but musician and layman alike were uncertain of what he could do with jazz idioms in one of the larger forms of composition. A remarkable pianist himself, Gershwin was asked by Whiteman to attempt the medium of the piano concerto. He was then only twenty-six years old and less familiar with orchestral and jazz-band scoring than he subsequently became. Consequently Grofé, who had been with Paul Whiteman's organization since 1920, accepted the task of orchestrating the accompaniment for the much-anticipated performance. The success of Grofé's work was likewise overwhelming, and the original features of the Rhapsody's instrumentation are practically as famous (and as influential) as the music written by Gershwin.</em>

<em>The autograph score received by the Library of Congress is the one made by Grofé in the course of orchestrating the Rhapsody. Except for the extended solo piano passages and the cadenzas, which were written down by a copyist, it is all in Grofé's hand and constitutes one of the most important manuscripts in the Library's collection of musical holographs. It consists of thirty-one leaves, the last two blank, measuring 13 ½ by 10 ½ inches. The changes from one instrument to another, the special technics of jazz playing, the devices for percussion effects, the solo treatment of woods and brasses are all clearly indicated, and the genius of the orchestrator shines forth from every page. Grofé became, in his own right, one of America's most eminent composers, universally acknowledged for his imagination and originality in instrumental combinations. He enjoyed a long creative career. Yet his early association with Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue is of first importance, too, and the manuscript he presented to the Library, which now resides in the Ferde Grofé Collection, is a document of lasting significance. </em>


Albert
Last edited by ahaim on July 15th, 2012, 2:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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