"Olga". King Oliver and His Orchestra. 1930.

"Olga". King Oliver and His Orchestra. 1930.

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 7th, 2012, 6:00 pm #1


<em>Olga</em> is a composition by D. C. Nelson and Joe Oliver. Recorded May 22, 1930 in New York. According to Rust:

Carroll Dickerson, dir; King Oliver, Dave Nelson, t; Jimmy Archey, tb; Bobby Holmes, cl,as; Glyn Paque, as; Charles Frazier, ts; Eric Franker, p; Arthur Taylor, bj; Clinton Walker, bb; Fred Moore, d.

Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyX1yTazvxM

This is no longer New Orleans style, polyphonic ensemble. Beginning with the trombone solo it sounds to me like a ballad in the style of  Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>. In fact, to my ears, <em>Olga</em> has the feeling of <em>Rite Tite</em> by Benny Moten. To me, <em>Rite Tite </em>is an obvious tribute to Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>, with pieces of Tram's solo thrown in for good measure. <em>Olga</em> also has a structure similar to that of <em>Singin' the Blues</em>: not too much ensemble work, a series of mellow solos; open trumpet (King Oliver?) muted trumpet (Joe's nephew Nelson?) clarinet (Holmes) alto sax (Holmes or Paque?)

What do you guys and dolls think?

Albert

PS For comparison here is Rite Tite.

www.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3b/VIC55423-1.mp3

Reply
Like
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 7th, 2012, 6:06 pm #2


I forgot to mention that I heard the recording of King Oliver's <em>Olga</em> in yesterday's Big Broadcast. The similarity to <em>Singin' the Blues </em>and <em>Rite Tite</em> struck me immedately.

Albert
Last edited by ahaim on May 7th, 2012, 9:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reply
Like
Share

Glenda Childress
Glenda Childress

May 7th, 2012, 8:35 pm #3

<em>Olga</em> is a composition by D. C. Nelson and Joe Oliver. Recorded May 22, 1930 in New York. According to Rust:

Carroll Dickerson, dir; King Oliver, Dave Nelson, t; Jimmy Archey, tb; Bobby Holmes, cl,as; Glyn Paque, as; Charles Frazier, ts; Eric Franker, p; Arthur Taylor, bj; Clinton Walker, bb; Fred Moore, d.

Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyX1yTazvxM

This is no longer New Orleans style, polyphonic ensemble. Beginning with the trombone solo it sounds to me like a ballad in the style of  Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>. In fact, to my ears, <em>Olga</em> has the feeling of <em>Rite Tite</em> by Benny Moten. To me, <em>Rite Tite </em>is an obvious tribute to Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>, with pieces of Tram's solo thrown in for good measure. <em>Olga</em> also has a structure similar to that of <em>Singin' the Blues</em>: not too much ensemble work, a series of mellow solos; open trumpet (King Oliver?) muted trumpet (Joe's nephew Nelson?) clarinet (Holmes) alto sax (Holmes or Paque?)

What do you guys and dolls think?

Albert

PS For comparison here is Rite Tite.

www.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3b/VIC55423-1.mp3
They <em>are</em> both slow ballads, like "Singin' the Blues." Oliver's "Olga" hit me as definitely more of the swing era arrangement than Moten's, which is definitely "jazzy" in style with a prominent rhythm section. Bix 's & Tram"s was closer to Moten's, in the traditional jazz mode, but had a different feel, since it's basically an intro, two extended solos, and a closing, with very little ensemble playing, aside from background chords, and Lang's near "duet" accompaniment to Bix's solo.
Reply
Share

Brian Goggin
Brian Goggin

May 31st, 2012, 1:59 pm #4

<em>Olga</em> is a composition by D. C. Nelson and Joe Oliver. Recorded May 22, 1930 in New York. According to Rust:

Carroll Dickerson, dir; King Oliver, Dave Nelson, t; Jimmy Archey, tb; Bobby Holmes, cl,as; Glyn Paque, as; Charles Frazier, ts; Eric Franker, p; Arthur Taylor, bj; Clinton Walker, bb; Fred Moore, d.

Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyX1yTazvxM

This is no longer New Orleans style, polyphonic ensemble. Beginning with the trombone solo it sounds to me like a ballad in the style of  Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>. In fact, to my ears, <em>Olga</em> has the feeling of <em>Rite Tite</em> by Benny Moten. To me, <em>Rite Tite </em>is an obvious tribute to Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>, with pieces of Tram's solo thrown in for good measure. <em>Olga</em> also has a structure similar to that of <em>Singin' the Blues</em>: not too much ensemble work, a series of mellow solos; open trumpet (King Oliver?) muted trumpet (Joe's nephew Nelson?) clarinet (Holmes) alto sax (Holmes or Paque?)

What do you guys and dolls think?

Albert

PS For comparison here is Rite Tite.

www.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3b/VIC55423-1.mp3
Hi Albert,

Hope all is good with you.

The clarinet is Bobby Holmes and the alto sax is Glyn Paque. I believe both the open and muted solos are by Oliver himself. The muted sound is the big mystery on this one. I think it's an old style Harmon type mute or an ancestor of the Harmon mute, as the closest sound I can get to it is the Emo plastic wow-wow mute, which is like a harmon but has a straight tube instead of a cupped plunger shape out the end of it. Whatever he used, it's a really beautiful sound. Nelson uses the same mute on some of his own records also.

I've always loved this record. Trying to learn the trumpet parts at the moment actually.

Are you familiar with both takes? Take-1 surfaced a few years ago and was released on a 1992 Bluebird album.

Oliver was really on-form on this session (he barely played at all on the previous session) - the other 2 pieces are "Struggle Buggy" and "Don't You Think I Love You", which has a great open solo by him.

All the best,
Brian.
Reply
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

May 31st, 2012, 3:11 pm #5


So perhaps King Oliver himself doing both solos? I would have guessed Oliver open and Nelson muted.

Everything good here. Very busy tracking down new Bixographic information.

Regards,

Albert

 
Reply
Like
Share

michael mills
michael mills

June 5th, 2012, 4:11 am #6

<em>Olga</em> is a composition by D. C. Nelson and Joe Oliver. Recorded May 22, 1930 in New York. According to Rust:

Carroll Dickerson, dir; King Oliver, Dave Nelson, t; Jimmy Archey, tb; Bobby Holmes, cl,as; Glyn Paque, as; Charles Frazier, ts; Eric Franker, p; Arthur Taylor, bj; Clinton Walker, bb; Fred Moore, d.

Listen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nyX1yTazvxM

This is no longer New Orleans style, polyphonic ensemble. Beginning with the trombone solo it sounds to me like a ballad in the style of  Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>. In fact, to my ears, <em>Olga</em> has the feeling of <em>Rite Tite</em> by Benny Moten. To me, <em>Rite Tite </em>is an obvious tribute to Bix and Tram's <em>Singin' the Blues</em>, with pieces of Tram's solo thrown in for good measure. <em>Olga</em> also has a structure similar to that of <em>Singin' the Blues</em>: not too much ensemble work, a series of mellow solos; open trumpet (King Oliver?) muted trumpet (Joe's nephew Nelson?) clarinet (Holmes) alto sax (Holmes or Paque?)

What do you guys and dolls think?

Albert

PS For comparison here is Rite Tite.

www.jazz-on-line.com/a/mp3b/VIC55423-1.mp3
Wow! Who's playing trumpet? The resemblance to Olga is quite strong. The remblance to Bix & Tram I'll need to work out in my head. It's an interesting idea.
Reply
Share

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

June 5th, 2012, 5:59 pm #7


Two cornet players in the recording, Booker Washington and Ed Lewis.  I don't know which one it is.

Albert
Reply
Like
Share