Old Gold Hour, Feb 5, 1929, 9 PM EST Columbia Network

Old Gold Hour, Feb 5, 1929, 9 PM EST Columbia Network

Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 30th, 2009, 2:25 pm #1

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>As a response to B. A. Rolfe's radio program sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes, Whiteman decided to go on nationwide radio. Beginning in Sep 1928, B. A. Rolfe, with a band of at first 35 but eventually 55 musicians, had been transmitting over network radio a program of dance music, The Lucky Strike Dance Hour. I believe the premiere took place on Sep 22, 1928 at 9 PM over the National Broadcasting hookup. Among musicians in the band were Tommy Dorsey and Ross Gorman. One of the features of the band was a giant xylophone, the Rolfaphone. I have been unable to find any information about this instrument. Maybe Enrico can ask Scott Robinson who loves huge instruments. See<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEgCASLiGTU</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>As an example of the kind of music Rolfe played in the programs, here are the tunes in the Jan 5, 1929 program</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>This is My Lucky Day</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Hello Sweetie</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Me and the Man in the Moon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Birth of the Blues</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Black Bottom</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><span>Carolina</span><span> Moon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Waltz The Red Mill</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Dont Be Like That</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Moonlight and Roses</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Doing the Racoon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Somebody Stole My Gal</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Varsity Rag</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Ready for the River</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Tres Moutarde</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Lila</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Beautiful Ohio Was It A Dream?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>International Rag</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>This is My Lucky Day</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>To listen to some recordings of B. A. Rolfes orchestra (note the prominent xylophone) , visit</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xPQ45N3qVs <span> </span>The great Cole Porter tune, Lets Do It. One of my favorite tunes in the whole wide world</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgKAh3kq_1s <span> </span>One of the tunes in the Jan 5, 1929 program</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whiteman's <span> </span>The Old Gold Hour was sponsored by the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company and transmitted over the Columbia Network (more than 40 stations) on Tuesday evenings. Whiteman received $5,000 per program and was instructed to pack as many tunes as possible in the program. Usually he managed to get in 13 to 15 numbers. Here is an announcement of the premiere in the Feb 3, 1929 Davenport Democrat and Leader. Although Bix did not play on this occasion (he was home recuperating from pneumonia), get a load of the number of Bix tunes played by the orchestra.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whiteman to Give Concert of Old Songs</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Open Two-Year Series Tuesday With Program of Favorites.</span><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Paul<span>  </span>Whiteman, king of Jazz, has decided on his inaugural program for the radio hour to be broadcast Tuesday night, at 8 o'clock, central time, over a nationwide hookup of the Columbia system. In this sponsored series scheduled to extend over a period of two years, Whiteman says he welcomes the opportunity to reach a nationwide audience and find out the reaction of millions ot people to his music.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>For his first program, he has selected a medley of songs of the past that first made him famous. Including "Whispering," "Avalon" and "Japanese Sandman."</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>The complete program:</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Medley, (a) Whispering. (b) Japanese Sandman, <span>(c) </span>Avalon. (d) Do You ever Think of Me,<span>  </span>(e) Who. (f) <span>Linger </span>A While<span></span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>How About Me</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Libestraum</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whoopie [sic]</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Red, Red Rose</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Angelina</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>My Pretty Girl</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Gypsy</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Let's <span>Do </span>It</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Dardanella</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Song <span>of Songs for Me</span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>River Boat [sic] Shuffle</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Singing the Blues</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>For comparison, listen to Whiteman's version of "Let's Do It."</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0liy8Ud6Gx0 Get a load of that bassoon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 30th, 2009, 7:39 pm #2


Since Bix was home in Davenport on Feb 3 and 5, 1929, and the local paper carried a notice of Whiteman's broadcast, it is almost certain that Bix mentioned the program to his parents (after all, Bix had been a member of the Whiteman band for over a year, and spending time home, he must have told his parents several anecdotes about the band's tribulations). It is also very likely that Bix listened to the premiere of the Old Gold Hour on Feb 5, after all, this was a national event, the premiere of a coast to coast broadcast by the most popular band in the US at the time, one that Bix belonged to! I am also pretty sure that Bix's parents (at least his mother) listened to the program. Bix was home until early March, so the Old Gold Hour programs of Feb 5, 12, 19 and 26 were broadcast when Bix was home. He must have listened to all the programs, and very likely his parents too. That was probably the beginning of Bix's mother regularly tuning on Tuesdays to the Old Gold Hour. But that was not the beginning of Bix's mother listening to Whiteman's broadcasts. As we know from her interview in the Davenport Democrat and Leader of almost a year earlier, April 25, 1928, Bix's mother (and probably father, Agatha uses the word "we) listened to Whiteman's broadcasts <strong>everytime</strong> they were on the air. Agatha told the reporter "We can always tell when Bix's horn comes in," says his mother. "We know everytime Paul Whiteman's orchestra is on the air and Leon knows we'll be listening in. The air is carried out by the other cornetist but the sudden perky blare and the unexpected trills-those are the jazz parts and they are Leon's."

Albert
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Joined: January 1st, 1970, 12:00 am

November 30th, 2009, 10:09 pm #3

<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>As a response to B. A. Rolfe's radio program sponsored by Lucky Strike cigarettes, Whiteman decided to go on nationwide radio. Beginning in Sep 1928, B. A. Rolfe, with a band of at first 35 but eventually 55 musicians, had been transmitting over network radio a program of dance music, The Lucky Strike Dance Hour. I believe the premiere took place on Sep 22, 1928 at 9 PM over the National Broadcasting hookup. Among musicians in the band were Tommy Dorsey and Ross Gorman. One of the features of the band was a giant xylophone, the Rolfaphone. I have been unable to find any information about this instrument. Maybe Enrico can ask Scott Robinson who loves huge instruments. See<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" /></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XEgCASLiGTU</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>As an example of the kind of music Rolfe played in the programs, here are the tunes in the Jan 5, 1929 program</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>This is My Lucky Day</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Hello Sweetie</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Me and the Man in the Moon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Birth of the Blues</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Black Bottom</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><?xml:namespace prefix = st1 ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:smarttags" /><span>Carolina</span><span> Moon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Waltz The Red Mill</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Dont Be Like That</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Moonlight and Roses</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Doing the Racoon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Somebody Stole My Gal</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Varsity Rag</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Ready for the River</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Tres Moutarde</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Lila</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Beautiful Ohio Was It A Dream?</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>International Rag</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>This is My Lucky Day</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>To listen to some recordings of B. A. Rolfes orchestra (note the prominent xylophone) , visit</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xPQ45N3qVs <span> </span>The great Cole Porter tune, Lets Do It. One of my favorite tunes in the whole wide world</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TgKAh3kq_1s <span> </span>One of the tunes in the Jan 5, 1929 program</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whiteman's <span> </span>The Old Gold Hour was sponsored by the P. Lorillard Tobacco Company and transmitted over the Columbia Network (more than 40 stations) on Tuesday evenings. Whiteman received $5,000 per program and was instructed to pack as many tunes as possible in the program. Usually he managed to get in 13 to 15 numbers. Here is an announcement of the premiere in the Feb 3, 1929 Davenport Democrat and Leader. Although Bix did not play on this occasion (he was home recuperating from pneumonia), get a load of the number of Bix tunes played by the orchestra.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whiteman to Give Concert of Old Songs</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Open Two-Year Series Tuesday With Program of Favorites.</span><span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Paul<span>  </span>Whiteman, king of Jazz, has decided on his inaugural program for the radio hour to be broadcast Tuesday night, at 8 o'clock, central time, over a nationwide hookup of the Columbia system. In this sponsored series scheduled to extend over a period of two years, Whiteman says he welcomes the opportunity to reach a nationwide audience and find out the reaction of millions ot people to his music.</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>For his first program, he has selected a medley of songs of the past that first made him famous. Including "Whispering," "Avalon" and "Japanese Sandman."</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span> </span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>The complete program:</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Medley, (a) Whispering. (b) Japanese Sandman, <span>(c) </span>Avalon. (d) Do You ever Think of Me,<span>  </span>(e) Who. (f) <span>Linger </span>A While<span></span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>How About Me</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Libestraum</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Whoopie [sic]</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Red, Red Rose</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Angelina</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>My Pretty Girl</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Gypsy</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Let's <span>Do </span>It</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Dardanella</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Song <span>of Songs for Me</span></span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>River Boat [sic] Shuffle</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Singing the Blues</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>For comparison, listen to Whiteman's version of "Let's Do It."</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0liy8Ud6Gx0 Get a load of that bassoon</span>
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span></span> 
<p style="margin:0in 0in 0pt;"><span>Albert</span>
Another mention of Bix in the press while he was alive.
<em><span>"Variety carried a front page </span><span>picture of Paul Whiteman and </span><span>his orchestra last week. That </span><span>was not as interesting as the fact </span><span>that one of the good-looking musicians was a Davenporter, Bix Beiderbecke."</span></em>
<span>Albert</span>
PS This is the picture in Variety  
 
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